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Se muestran los artículos pertenecientes a Noviembre de 2015.

Beowulf & Grendel

 

viernes, 19 de septiembre de 2014

Beowulf & Grendel

 


Beowulf & Grendel. Dir. Sturla Gunnarson. Very loosely inspired by Beowulf. Cast: Gerard Butler (Beowulf), Stellan Skarsgärd (Hrothgar), Ingvar Eggert Sigurdsson (Grendel, Sarah Polley (Selma), Eddie Marsan, Tony Curran, Rory McCann, Ronan Vibert, Martin Delaney. Movies Downunder / Movision / Darc Light / Endgame Entertainment / Film Works / Eurasia Motion Pictures / Goodweird / Spice Factory / Icelandic Film Corporation, 2005. Online at YouTube (Shlomo Rotem)
In Spanish, YouTube (Ampii G)
2014

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:41. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Cine






Todo a StatCounter

sábado, 20 de septiembre de 2014

Todo a StatCounter

Mis visitas en StatCounter


Añado hoy la Bibliografía, al dejar de funcionar su contador tras diez años. 117.727 visitas, más otras tantas aproximadamente en los diez años anteriores, en que usé otro contador.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:45. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Internet




Leaving San Sèrvolo

 

domingo, 21 de septiembre de 2014

Leaving San Sèrvolo

Leaving San Sèrvolo

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:48. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes




18. Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians

domingo, 21 de septiembre de 2014

18. Street Wars of Religion: Puritans and Arminians




From Keith E. Wrightson's Yale course on Early Modern England. Puritans can usefully be thought of as Protestant fundamentalists, the equivalent of today's extremist Muslim popular movements, advocating the permeation of a 17th-c. Christian sharia throughout all aspects of social and political life. They were revolutionaries all right, but rather in the line of Christian Ayatollahs. And revolutions, not to forget, are usually led by an elite seeking power, in this case a middle-class elite.

With the triumph of the Revolution, much of the everyday life of the English came to be dominated by this Puritan mixture of Thought Police and Sin Police, and it is perhaps a negative reaction to this tyrannical invasion of privacy and everyday life, rather than an active passion for the monarchy, that explains the widespread relief at the Restoration of the Stuarts.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:50. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Historia




GENRE

 

lunes, 22 de septiembre de 2014

GENRE

From The Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics:

GENRE. The term "genre"is often used interchangeably with "type," "kind," and "form." Western theory on the subject of whether works of literature can be classified into distinct kinds appears at the beginning of literary study and has sustained active controversies in every stage of literary history. Alternately extolled and condemned, praised for its potential for order and ingnored as, finally, irrelevant, the concept takes its tone, in every age, from the particular theory that surrounds it. Theorists approached it prescriptively until about the end of the 18th century, descriptively thereafter; and it retains its viability (if not always its honor) through the plethora of modern comments about the nature of possibilities of literature. But built into its ways of working are difficulties that have ultimately to do with a version of the hermeneutic circle: how can we choose specific works to draw a definition of, say, epic (q.v.) unless we already know what an epic is? Though answered in various ways, the question continues to insinuate itself.

Classical poetics (q.v.) had no systematic theory about the concept of genre. What thinking there is at the beginning of western poetics originates from a distinction made by Plato between two possible modes of reproducing an object or person: (1) by description (i.e. by portraying it by means of words) or (2) by mimicry or impersonation (i.e. by imitating it). Since poetry according to the mimetic theory (see IMITATION; REPRESENTATION AND MIMESIS; POETRY, THEORIES OF) was conceived as such a reproduction of external objects, these two modes became the main division of poetry: dramatic poetry (q.v.) or the theatre was direct imitation or miming of persons, and narrative poetry (q.v.) or the epic was the portrayal of descriptions of human actions.

But since this simple division obviously left out too much, a third division was inserted between the two others (Republic 3.392-94): the so-called mixed mode, in which narrative alternates with dialogue (q.v.), as is usually the case in epic poetry (which is rarely pure narrative). But no new principle of classification was thereby introduced, so no room was left for the genre of self-expression or the lyric (q.v.), in whicvh the poet expresses directly her or his own thoughts or feelings. The extensive use of Homer as a model gave clear if implicit preference to the epic, a point echoed in Laws, which comments effectually mark the beginning of the hierarchy of genres. The classification is as much moral as it is literary. Plato says subsequently that the guardians should imitate only the most suitable characters (395) but that there are impersonators who will imitate anything (397).

Prior to Plato, during the Attic age, we find a wide variety of terms for specific genres: the epic or recited poetry; the drama or acted poetry, subdivided into tragedy and comedy (qq.v.); then iambic or satirical poetry, so called because written in iambic meter (see IAMBIC; INVECTIVE; CHOLIAMBUS); and elegiac poetry (see ELEGY), also written in a distinctive meter, the elegiac couplet (see ELEGIAC DISTYCH), with its offshoots the epitaph and the epigram (qq.v.), all classed together because composed in the same meter. Then there was choral or melic poetry (q.v.), as it was later called, poetry sung by a chorus to the accompaniment of a flute or stringed instrument. Melic poverty comes closest to our concept of the lyric, but it is not divorced from music and it excludes what we consider the essentially lyric genres of the elegy and epigram. In addition, there was the hymn (q.v.), the dirge (q.v.) or threnos, and the dithyram (q.v.), a composition in honor of Dionysius which could be anything from a hymn to a miniature play. Songs of triumph or of celebration included the paean, the encomium, the epinikion, and the epithalamium (qq.v.) There was certainly plenty of material in Greek poetry to make up a concept of lyric poetry, but the early Greeks apparently contented themselves with classifying by such criteria as metrical form.

The purely extrinsic scheme used for the nonce by Plato is taken up by Aristotle in Poetics ch. 3, where it becomes the foundation of his main classification of poetic genres. Aristotle gives no express recognition of the lyric there, much less in his statement that in the second of these genres the poet "speaks in his own person": that is merely Aristotle's way of saying that the narrative is the poet's own discourse and not a speech by a fictitious character of drama. So the traditional tripartite division of poetic genres or kinds into epic, dramatic, and lyric, far from being a "natural" division first discovered by the Greek genius, is not to be found in either Plato or Aristotle. It was, rather, the result of a long and tedious process of compilation or adjustment, through the repetition with slight variations of certain traditional lists of poetic genres, which did not reach the modern formula of the three divisions until the 16th century.

Nevertheless, Aristotle's classifications of kind in the Poetics make him the source and arbiter of genre study (though often at only second or even third hand, and frequently warped) for nearly two millennia. Like Plato, Aristotle argues that poetry is a species of imitation. The medium of imitation concerns the instrumentality through which the various kinds are presented. The object of imitation, men in action, has both contentual and moral aspects, tragedy and comedy dealing with men as better or worse than they are; but the package is not nearly so neat because Cleophon, though a tragic poet, represents a middle way, men as they are—a significant point which shows how Aristotle's examples can complicate the issue appropriately. On the manner of imitation, Aristotle continues the general Platonic divisions according to the status of the speaker.

All of this supports the view that Aristotle is arguably the first formalist, the first exponent of organic unity (see ORGANICISM); for him, mode, object, and manner, working together, not only make for the "character" of the kind but affect (and effect) all that each aspect does and is. Yet he is a formalist and a good deal more, for his connection of genre with tone and moral stance led not only to later quarrels about decorum (q.v.) and mixed modes but also, and more profitably, about the ways in which texts seek to conceive and appropriate tha world—that is, the difficult business of representation, including his implicit debate with Plato over its possibilities and value.

After Aristotle, it was Alexandrian scholarship that undertook the first comprehensive stock-taking of Greek poetry and began the process of grouping, grading, and classifying genres. Lists or "canons" of the best writers of each kind were made, which led to a sharper awareness of genre. The first extant grammarian to mention the lyric as a genre was Dionysius Thrax (2d c. B.C.), in a list which comprises, in all, the following: "Tragedy, Comedy, Elegy, Epos, Lyric, and Threnos," lyric meaning for him, still, poetry sung to the lyre. In Alexandrian literature, other genres were added to the list, especially the idyll and pastoral (qq.v.).

The Greek conceptions of genre were themselves radically generic in the sense of putting the issues in their elemental forms. What followed—adulation, elaboration, correction, rejection—built on those ways of working. Yet it was clear to later Classicism (q.v.) that these treatises needded supplementary detail, their nearly exclusive emphases on epic and tragedy being insufficient to cover the complex topography of genre. Futher, with the model of the Greeks so potent that there was no thought of undoing their principles, it seemed best not only to elaborate but to clarify and purify, to establish principles of tact which were not only matters of taste (q.v.) but, ultimately, of the appropriate. The Middle Ages, and later, the 17th c., was a time for codification, which could slip easily into rules (q.v.). Quintilian's Institutio oratoria argued for such practices, but most important was Horace's Ars poetica (a name given by Quintilian to the Epistula ad Pisones), a text of extraordinary influence bevcause so many later students read the Greeks through Horace's letter (see CLASSICAL POETICS). The attitudes of Horace were often taken as the classical ways.

Party of the irony is that his letter is not particularly original: its outstanding contribution is the principle of decorum. Aristotle had referred to the interrelation of style with theme, but in Horace this combined with the demands of urbanity and propriety to become the principal emphasis. Tragedy does not babble light verses. Plays ought to be in five acts, no more and no less, with all bloodiness offstage. Plunge into epics in medias res (q.v.), but echo the categories of the strong predecessors either by telling those events or have them acted out. At this distance, Horace comes through mainly as the exponent of a set of mind, one who shourely had much to do with later equations of social and literary decorum. Given his emphasis on "the labor of the file," he is probably best seen as the ultimate craftsman, completer of the Classical triumvirate on which genre study built for most of the rest of Western literary history.

Schlolars are generally agreed that the Middle Ages offered little if any commentary of permanent value on the theory of genre, and they usually cite Dante's remarks in De vulgari eloquentia (ca. 1305) as the major points of interest. In fact though, Dante's account shows a curious transformation of tradition, especially in his insistence that his poem is a comedy because it has a happy ending and is written in a middle style; this sense of "comedy" Dante found in Donatus, De comoedia, and Euanthius, De fabula. Dante argued for a quasi-Horatian decorum of genre and style. In a sense the Commedia culminates medieval mixtures of the grotesque and the sublime (qq.v.), as in the mystery plays (see LITURGICAL DRAMA), but it also suggests, if unwittingly, an undoing of generic norms that was to cause much bitter controversy in subsequent approaches.

As though to counter such implicit subversion, the theorists of the Italian Renaissance focused intensely on genre (see RENAISSANCE POETICS); the rediscovery of the Poetics around 1500 became an impetus to codifications such as had never been conceived even in the most rigorous late Classical formulations. Part of the intensity came from the wide variety of genres and mixed modes such as the prosimetrum (q.v.) practiced in the Middle Ages, leading to the blend of medieval romance (q.v.) and epic in figures such as Ariosto and Tasso. If there were 16th-c. defenders of these "mixed" works—among which tragicomedy (q.v.) was surely the most notorious (Guarini argued in his own defense, but the greatest of the kind were written in England)—there were codifiers such as Scaliger and Castelvetro who had considerable influence well into the 18th century.

Out of these theorists came that ultimate codification, the "unities" of time, place, and action (see UNITY), which was finally put to rest only in the 18th. c. by critics such as Samuel Johnson (see NEOCLASSICAL POETICS). Though they were claimed to have their sources in Aristotle's categories, in fact these arguments distorted Aristotle and carried Horatian conservatism to reactionary lengths. French Neoclassicism continued the codification, quite brilliantly in Boileau's Art poétique, more ambivalently in Corneille's Discours, the latter an apologia for his dramatic practice which is, at the same time, an act of support for the unities. Suggestions that Neoclassical generic hierarchies and standards of decorum have sociopolitical and philosophical implications are, for the most part, convincing: the potential analogies among these favorite subjects ensured their mutual support and offer still another instance of the relations of literature and power. Yet as both literature and society worked their way into romanticism (q.v.), most of those hierarchies shifted: in literature the lyric ascended to the top of the hierarchy, signaling the confirmation of the triad of lyric, epic (i.e. narrative), and drama which is set forth by Hegel and still dominates genre theory. Friedrich Schlegel (in his Dialogue on Poetry [1800] and essay on Goethe [1828]) artued for the abolition of generic classifications, which would in efffect eliminate genre. Schlegel and others had in mind the example of Cervantes, expanding the concept of the novel to speak of it as a package that could carry all other genres within itself, e.g. ballads and romances within tales as in Matthew Gregory Lewis's The Monk and, memorably, Poe's Fall of the House of Usher. International romanticism explored such issues routinely. But when 19th-c. Darwinian biology found application to literature, it produced a rigidly evolutionary theory of genre in Brunetière and others., a dead-end whose main value is that it annoyed theorists like Croce, who considered genres as mere abstractions, useful in the construction of classifications for practical convenience, but of no value as aesthetic categories. Thereby it stimulated interest in grenre theory in the 20th century, one of the great ages of speculation on the subject.

Croce became the case against which theorists tested themselves for much of the early 20th century (see EXPRESSION). If genre classifications have a certain convenience, they nevertheless conflict with Croce's conception of the individual work of art as the product of a unique intuition (q.v.). Genre, in this view, has a merely nominalist existence, a position echoed in varying ways by later theorists as significant and different as Jameson and, in one of his moods, the unclassifiable Frye—though the latter set up an elaborate system of classification which all commentators have taken as another way of talking about genre. Todorov's structuralist attack on Frye resulted in a controversial proposal concerning historical and theoretical genres, but Frye remains the most important theorist of the subject since Croce. Scholars like Fowler have argued eloquently for looser, more historically based readings, recognizing the fact of change and the necessity for flexibility, while concepts like intertextuality (q.v.) obviously have much of importance to say about the workings of genre. Formalists of various persuasions have worried about genre in terms of form-content relations (see ORGANICISM). Drawing on the work of Karl Viëtor, Claudio Guillén distinguishes persuasively between universal modes of experience (lyric, epic, drama) and genres proper (tragedy or the sonnet). Other recent theorists argue for the institutional nature of genre for its functions as a series of codes, and (less convincingly) as an element in a langue-parole relationship, while Fowler and others, working out of Frye, stress the significance of the concept of "mode." Still, Jameson's argument that genre theory has been discredited by modern thinking about literature seems now largely convincing. Recognition of the embodiment of literature in the necessary shifting conditions of culture has led a number of theorists to argue that a genre is whatever a particular text or time claims it to be. Skepticism about universals has clearly taken its toll, as have, in other ways, the arguments of Croce. Such skepticism has appeared among contemporary artists as well, e.g. the performance artist Laurie Anderson and the composer-writer-performer John Cage, who pull down all walls of distinction among genres and media as well as what has been called "high art" and "low art" (Here as elsewhere sociocultural elements cannot be separated from other facets of the work.) Terms like "multimedia" and "intermedia" can be complemented by others such as "intergeneric," such practices denying, in varying degree, the validity of absolute distinctions, categories, and hierarchies. Theorizing about genre has not been so vigorous since the 16th century. The suggestiveness of the 20th century's quite variegated work makes it a period of extraordinary achievement in the history of this stubborn, dubious, always controversial concept. For further discussion of mode and genre see VERSE AND PROSE; see also CANON; CONVENTION; FORM; ORGANICISM; RULES.


JOURNAL: Genre 1— (1968-).
STUDIES:  F. Brunetière, L'Evolution des genres. 7th ed. (1922); B. Croce,  Aesthetic, tr. D. Ainslie, 2nd ed. (1922); J. Petersen, "Zur Lehre von den Dichtungsgattungen," Festschrift Aug. Sauer (1925); K. Viëtor, "Probleme der literarische Gattungsgeschichte," DVLG 9 (1931), "Die Geschichte der literarischen Gattungen," Geist und Form (1952); R. Bray, Des Genres littéraires (1937); K. Burke, "Poetic Categories." Attitudes toward History (1937); I. Behrens, Die Lehre von der Einteilung der Dichtkunst (1940)—best account of development of genre classification  in Western literature; J. J. Donohue, The Theory of Literary Kinds, 2 v. (1943-49)—ancient Greek genre classifications; I. Ehrenpreis, The "Types Approach" to Literature. (1945); C. Vincent, Théorie des genres littéraires, 21st ed. (1951); Abrams, chs. 1, 4. 6; E. Olson, "An Outline of Poetic Theory," in Crane; A. E. Harvey, "The Classification of Greek Lyric Poetry." ClassQ n.s. 5 (1955); Wellek and Warren, ch. 17; Frye; Wimsatt and Brooks; Weinberg, ch. 13; C. F. P. Stutterheim, "Prolegomena to a Theory of Literary Genres." ZRL 6 (1964); B. K. Lewalski, Milton's Brief Epic (1966), Paradise Lost and the Rhetoric of Literary Forms (1985), ed., Renaissance Genres (1986); F. Séngle, Die literarische Formenlehre (1967); W. V. Ruttkowski, Die literarischen Gattungen (1968)—bibl. with trilingual indices, Bibliographie der Gattungspoetik (1973); E. Staiger, Grundbegriffe der Poetik (1968), tr. J. C. Hudson and L. T. Frank as Basic Concepts of Poetics (1991); K. R. Scherpe, Gattungspoetik im 18 Jh. (1968); E. Vivas, "Literary Classes: Some Problems," Genre 1 (1968); H.-R. Jauss, "Littérature médiévale et théorie des genres," Poétique 1 (1970); T. Todorov, Introduction à la littérature fantastique (1970); Genres in Discourse (tr. 1990); M. Fubini, Entstehung und Geschichte der literarischen Gattungen (1971); C. Guillén, Literature as System (1971), chs. 4-5; P. Hernadi, Beyond Genre (1972); F. Cairns, Generic Composition in Greek and Roman Literature (1972); R. L. Colie, The Resources of Kind: Genre Theory in the Renaissance (1973); K. W. Hempfer, Gattungstheorie (1973); R. Cohen, "On the Interrelations of 18th-c. Literary Forms," and R. W. Rader, "The Concept of Genre and 18th-C. Studies," New Approaches to 18th-C. Literature, ed. P. Harth (1974); A. Jolles, Einfache Formen, 5th ed. (1974); G. W. F. Hegel, Aesthetics, tr. T. M. Knox (1975); G. Genette, "Genres, 'types,' modes," Poétique 32 (1977); K. Müller-Dyes, Literarische Gattungen (1978); "Theories of Literary Genre," ed. J. Strelka, special issue of YCC 8 (1978); Special Issue on Genre, Glyph 7 (1980); Special Issue on Genre Theory, Poetics 10, 2-3 (1981); F. Jameson, The Political Unconscious (1981); Fowler—the major modern study; H. Dubrow, Genre (1982); W. E. Rogers, The Three Genres and the Interpretation of Lyric (1983); B. J. Bond, Literary Transvaluation from Vergilian Epic to Shakespearean Tragicomedy (1984); Canons, ed. R. von Hallberg (1984); Discourse and Literature: New Appproaches to the Analysis of Literary Genres, ed. T. A. van Dijk (1984); T. G. Rosenmeyer, "Ancient Literary Genres: A Mirage?" YCGL 34 (1985); Postmodern Genres, ed. M. Perloff (1989).

[By Frederick Garber, T. V. F. Brogan et al.]

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:52. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Microblog de septiembre 2014

miércoles, 17 de septiembre de 2014

Microblog de septiembre 2014



Maintes masques

30 sep 14, 22:43
JoseAngel: Quand le voilier est dévoilé. C'était en septembre...
30 sep 14, 19:43
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30 sep 14, 19:29
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30 sep 14, 19:28
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30 sep 14, 15:48
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30 sep 14, 13:19
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29 sep 14, 22:08
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29 sep 14, 13:32
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28 sep 14, 21:34
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28 sep 14, 18:27
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28 sep 14, 15:09
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28 sep 14, 14:32
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28 sep 14, 13:24
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28 sep 14, 12:14
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27 sep 14, 20:04
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27 sep 14, 14:51
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27 sep 14, 11:36
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26 sep 14, 22:09
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26 sep 14, 21:37
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26 sep 14, 21:04
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26 sep 14, 20:55
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26 sep 14, 10:29
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25 sep 14, 23:56
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25 sep 14, 18:25
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24 sep 14, 23:30
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24 sep 14, 21:00
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24 sep 14, 08:54
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24 sep 14, 08:38
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23 sep 14, 23:24
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23 sep 14, 16:01
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22 sep 14, 17:23
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22 sep 14, 12:37
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22 sep 14, 10:04
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22 sep 14, 06:54
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20 sep 14, 16:17
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20 sep 14, 00:08
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19 sep 14, 21:45
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19 sep 14, 12:30
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18 sep 14, 23:45
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18 sep 14, 21:50
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18 sep 14, 12:41
JoseAngel: El origen de los europeos: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140918_z0_P33.pdf
18 sep 14, 12:26
JoseAngel: Pero peor sería la destrucción del Universo. Hawking avisa sobre el bosón de Higgs: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140918_z1_ternano.pdf
18 sep 14, 12:00
JoseAngel: UK RIP? Aquí votamos que NO: http://www.economist.com/news/leaders/21616957-ditching-union-would-be-mistake-scotland-and-tragedy-country-it-leaves
17 sep 14, 21:51
JoseAngel: Top 3% https://unizar.academia.edu/FranciscoColladoRodr%C3%ADguez
17 sep 14, 21:46
JoseAngel: unizar.academia.edu - 56 people, 460 documents; JAGL: 153 documents: https://unizar.academia.edu/Departments/Department_of_English_and_German_Philology
17 sep 14, 18:55
JoseAngel: La decisión más importante de Escocia, con el NO A LA UNION dominando la calle: http://www.libertaddigital.com/internacional/europa/2014-09-17/escocia-afronta-su-decision-mas-importante-con-solo-el-si
17 sep 14, 18:52
JoseAngel: El ránking universitario de este año. Suben los catalanes: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140917_z0_van33g.pdf
17 sep 14, 18:47
JoseAngel: Hombre, se saltan eso de que la apertura solemne del año pasado se suspendió por amenazas de grupos violentos tolerados: http://vimeo.com/106366377
17 sep 14, 09:28
JoseAngel: Me citan (como fuente única) en "Filología Inglesa" (Mashpedia). Ahora que se extingue la carrera. http://es.mashpedia.com/Filolog%C3%ADa_inglesa
17 sep 14, 09:28
JoseAngel: Often infuriating. So selectively blind... sheesh...
17 sep 14, 08:55
JoseAngel: Chomsky hopes electronic espionage on the part of the government may be banned... keep on dreaming (min. 18) http://youtu.be/Qxab6i9Qxyk
17 sep 14, 08:49
JoseAngel: Me enlazan en TRILCAT: Grup d'estudis de traducció, recepció i literatura catalana http://trilcat.upf.edu/enllacos/
17 sep 14, 08:00
JoseAngel: Chomsky on Scottish independence: http://youtu.be/H7UtwZD4c-A
16 sep 14, 23:50
JoseAngel: No hay Gran Isla de Plásticos, ahora: http://sociedad.elpais.com/sociedad/2014/09/16/actualidad/1410888404_398492.html
16 sep 14, 23:48
JoseAngel: Qué náusea, la dinámica de cesión a los secesionistas también en el Reino Unido: http://www.20minutos.es/noticia/2240033/0/referendum/escocia/promesas-londres/
16 sep 14, 23:22
JoseAngel: El coste del error de Cameron: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-15/federico-a-las-7-el-coste-del-error-de-cameron-78604.html
16 sep 14, 17:23
JoseAngel: Un tipo de narración simultánea poco estudiado. Por cierto, este individuo tiene ocho millones de suscriptores. (¡?!) http://youtu.be/B6WdUHBeY58
16 sep 14, 07:50
JoseAngel: Redeem Time Past: http://youtu.be/gfGjVajWv2o
15 sep 14, 20:59
JoseAngel: Mi bibliografía sobre cosas que empiezan por L: http://doc.document2.net/a/a-bibliography-of-literary-theory-criticism-and-philology-w757/
15 sep 14, 15:09
JoseAngel: Fernando Gamboa y las TICS en el Aula del Futuro: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=o7j0pZnO4H0
15 sep 14, 13:00
JoseAngel: ¿Burbuja de academias de inglés? http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140915_z0_hsuplemento.pdf
15 sep 14, 07:18
JoseAngel: El Banco de Santander ayudó a blanquear los fondos de los Pujol vendiéndoles sus oficinas: http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2014/09/15/5415fcefca4741b5718b4577.html
14 sep 14, 21:38
JoseAngel: Existe el peligro de ver demasiado claro.
14 sep 14, 07:02
JoseAngel: Un debate sobre el demonio, entre católicos en él creyentes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=e89zQWDJ5qk
14 sep 14, 06:41
JoseAngel: Entrevista con Albert Rivera: http://www.libertaddigital.com/espana/2014-09-13/albert-rivera-rajoy-y-mas-han-pactado-el-calendario-1276528145
13 sep 14, 23:16
JoseAngel: Pedro Santana et al. sobre Filosofía y Literatura: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=q4n78bO3rqU
13 sep 14, 22:52
JoseAngel: Aquí una reseña de Narratology en GoodReads: http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/1658007.Narratology
13 sep 14, 22:11
JoseAngel: Fray Josepho sobre el referendum catalán: http://www.libertaddigital.com/chic/entretenimiento/2014-09-12/fray-josepho-y-monsieur-de-sans-foy-habra-referendum-en-cataluna-73422/
13 sep 14, 17:39
JoseAngel: Si buscamos "anaciclosis"... http://www.search.ask.com/web?l=dis&q=anaciclosis&o=APN10645&apn_dtid=^BND406^YY^CL&shad=s_0041&apn_uid=0449723522424550&gct=ds&apn_ptnrs=^AG6&d=406-706&lang=es&atb=sysid%
13 sep 14, 17:34
JoseAngel: Conferencia de Albert Boadella: http://youtu.be/er1o_W-eD9Y
13 sep 14, 13:27
JoseAngel: Pío Moa sobre la involución permanente frente a los nacionalistas: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-13/involucion-permanente-con-pio-moa-13092014-78549.html
12 sep 14, 01:02
JoseAngel: Introduction to John Locke's Political Philosophy: http://youtu.be/nbnmtWtCABI
11 sep 14, 23:28
JoseAngel: SSRN: Jose Angel Garcia Landa Author Rank is 2,331 out of 262,061
11 sep 14, 21:37
JoseAngel: El alarde separatista de hoy: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-11/tertulia-de-dieter-el-desafio-de-la-diada-78483.html
11 sep 14, 19:19
JoseAngel: Scottish Independence debate Perth (The Courier, 2 Sept): https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=V7Wg7QI0fas
11 sep 14, 18:56
JoseAngel: 3,000 Books: (Half) a Lifetime of Reading: http://blogs.uab.cat/saramartinalegre/2014/08/20/3000-books-half-a-life-time-of-reading/
11 sep 14, 17:23
JoseAngel: Qué penica dan los catalanes, por dios...
11 sep 14, 15:53
JoseAngel: Asexuals: http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.2218783
11 sep 14, 13:40
JoseAngel: (El) mañana habrá sido escrito: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/091105--el-manana-habra-sido-escrito.php
11 sep 14, 12:00
JoseAngel: Cuando menos lo esperamos... nos cae una pedregada http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140911_z0_h9.pdf
11 sep 14, 11:58
JoseAngel: La trayectoria de Botín, en el Heraldo: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140911_z0_h36.pdf
11 sep 14, 11:56
JoseAngel: Malos alumnos y malos profesores en la Universidad, dicen.. http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140910_z1_EM16.pdf
11 sep 14, 10:22
JoseAngel: La lección más importante a extraer del caso Botín: que nadie nos asegura que vayamos a seguir vivos dentro de un minuto siquiera. Así es la cosa.
11 sep 14, 10:21
JoseAngel: Un lugar donde recrearse la pupila: Lambda García: http://unlugarpararecrearselapupila.blogspot.com/2008/06/lambda-garcia.html
10 sep 14, 22:04
JoseAngel: Emilio Botín, el amigo de los presidentes: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-10/editorial-de-luis-herrero-emilio-botin-el-amigo-de-los-presidentes-78437.html
10 sep 14, 19:08
JoseAngel: Scotland and the European Union: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yF_NVhYlh2o
10 sep 14, 16:34
JoseAngel: La independencia escocesa, hace 22 años. Y ya ven. http://youtu.be/l3h-9fAdJ5M
10 sep 14, 16:31
JoseAngel: Thoughts on Scottish Independence: http://thelibertarianalliance.com/2014/09/09/thoughts-on-scottish-independence/
10 sep 14, 16:11
JoseAngel: La Juez Alaya: https://www.flickr.com/photos/garciala/15012123288/in/photostream/
10 sep 14, 15:49
JoseAngel: Acción, Relato, Discurso—en Lingüística: http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/2014/08/accion-relato-discurso-en-linguistica.html
9 sep 14, 23:11
JoseAngel: Página web de la asignatura Introducción a la Literatura Inglesa (Grado en Lenguas Modernas): http://bit.ly/litingl
9 sep 14, 21:52
JoseAngel: Mi blog sobre Shakespeare, para la asignatura de la licenciatura en extinción: http://bit.ly/shkgl
9 sep 14, 21:51
JoseAngel: Best of Philip Glass: http://youtu.be/CeiK-sVJtZg
9 sep 14, 14:02
JoseAngel: Notes on Metafiction (1994): http://ssrn.com/abstract=2493731
9 sep 14, 13:08
JoseAngel: Cogiendo setas: http://youtu.be/8s-2DJvdOVI
9 sep 14, 12:46
JoseAngel: Restoration Comedy Project: http://www.teneopress.com/books/9781934844755.cfm
9 sep 14, 11:43
JoseAngel: Hawking, Higgs, y la destrucción del Universo: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140909_z0_M45.pdf
9 sep 14, 11:38
JoseAngel: El calendario académico de este año: http://wzar.unizar.es/servicios/calendario/14-15/calendario14_15.pdf
9 sep 14, 10:09
JoseAngel: David Hare (playwright): http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Hare_%28playwright%29
9 sep 14, 09:22
JoseAngel: No menciona a César Vidal, y sus tertulianos también callados como muertos XD
9 sep 14, 09:21
JoseAngel: Seguidamente dice que alguien tendrá que contar la historia de la Iglesia en España en los últimos años, que quién se anima a escribirla.
9 sep 14, 09:21
JoseAngel: Federico JIménez Losantos hablando de cómo el Opus es un bastión del independentismo catalán.
9 sep 14, 08:50
JoseAngel: Otra variante más de mi CV: http://esdocs.org/docs/index-10437.html
9 sep 14, 08:29
JoseAngel: Aquí en Netvibes una app para mi blog: http://www.netvibes.com/subscribe.php?url=http%3A%2F%2Fvanityfea.blogspot.com%2Ffeeds%2Fposts%2Fdefault
9 sep 14, 08:25
JoseAngel: не смотря на школу, ощущение того, что сейчас лето
9 sep 14, 07:21
JoseAngel: Los misterios de Michel Houellebecq: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-08/tertulia-de-los-sabios-los-misterios-de-michel-houellebecq-78349.html
8 sep 14, 18:34
JoseAngel: Acción: El concepto y su historia (Acción, Relato, Discurso, 1.1): https://www.academia.edu/8239409/
8 sep 14, 17:10
JoseAngel: De El País, claro.
8 sep 14, 17:10
JoseAngel: Aquí la sustancia de la tesis sobre el 11-M: http://elpais.com/elpais/2012/03/12/opinion/1331549943_494158.html
8 sep 14, 17:05
JoseAngel: —BOA 28/8/2014, grupo HERAF: http://herafunizar.wordpress.com/miembros-del-grupo/jose-angel-garcia-landa/
8 sep 14, 17:03
JoseAngel: Nos dan unos eurillos para investigar en Hermenéutica y Antropología Fenomenológica.
8 sep 14, 16:59
JoseAngel: Yo hago boicot a productos catalanes mientras voten gobiernos sediciosos y secesionistas; a productos vascos y navarros por fueros abusivos.
8 sep 14, 14:16
JoseAngel: Aires de cambio en la Uni... poco, de momento: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140908_z0_ABC7-1.pdf
7 sep 14, 20:07
JoseAngel: Cerramos, con tormenta eléctrica, la temporada de piscinas. Hasta el 2015, si llega. (Webster was much possessed by death).
7 sep 14, 14:47
JoseAngel: Academia Analytics: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda/Analytics#/overview
7 sep 14, 11:25
JoseAngel: Aquí promocionando mi bibliografía en las redes sociales. O quitándole puntos, quién sabe (?).
7 sep 14, 11:04
JoseAngel: Seguimos en la tercera legislatura de Zapatero: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-06/sin-complejos-completo-06092014-78264.html
7 sep 14, 11:01
JoseAngel: Hoy cumpleaños de MJ... que está al parecer en Bolivia.
7 sep 14, 01:27
JoseAngel: Bibliografía de Teoría Literaria, Crítica y Filología: http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/bibliography/bibliography.pdf
6 sep 14, 16:41
JoseAngel: Soaring Oil Debt: http://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2014/08/29/Soaring-Oil-Debt-Summer/
6 sep 14, 16:40
JoseAngel: Hoy empieza Pibo a estudiar ruso, y Oscar alemán.
6 sep 14, 11:14
JoseAngel: если захочешь, то можешь остаться
6 sep 14, 09:56
JoseAngel: Noticias de esta semana: Pujol, Aguirre, nacionalistas, musulmanes, etc.: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-05/tertulia-de-herrero-la-gran-coalicion-de-cospedal-contra-el-separatismo
6 sep 14, 08:42
JoseAngel: Información (poca) sobre mi sitio web: http://www.pageinsider.com/garcialanda.net#reviews
6 sep 14, 08:41
JoseAngel: Viendo a Fabiola — bastante más animada, pero el camino del duelo es largo.
5 sep 14, 18:07
JoseAngel: En el Cognitive Linguistics eJournal: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/090523-en-el-cognitive-linguistics-ejournal.php
5 sep 14, 16:47
JoseAngel: Stephen Greenblatt on Shakespeare life stories: http://youtu.be/icoMzAU36uU
5 sep 14, 14:10
JoseAngel: Terminating Shakespeare: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/090501-terminating-shakespeare.php
5 sep 14, 13:38
JoseAngel: Cosmos (9 h. de audio): http://www.ivoox.com/cosmos-odisea-espacio-tiempo-2014-serie-audios-mp3_rf_3372671_1.html
5 sep 14, 11:16
JoseAngel: La nueva página de la Universidad de Zaragoza es más dinámica, va transformándose en una revista, casi: http://www.unizar.es/
5 sep 14, 09:52
JoseAngel: Mi trabajillo de 1982, "John Donne: 'The Good-Morrow'," en Academia: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/256042490
4 sep 14, 19:59
JoseAngel: Grant Abbitt, Narrative Theory 1: http://youtu.be/YYGZgPuIyGw
4 sep 14, 14:47
JoseAngel: The Gunfighter: http://vimeo.com/79306807
4 sep 14, 13:47
JoseAngel: La posible alianza de UPyD y Ciudadanos: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-04/federico-a-las-7-rosa-diez-tranquila-con-rajoy-78164.html
4 sep 14, 12:09
JoseAngel: El País pide apoyo para la decisión de Merkel contra el Estado Islámico: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140904_z0_Pais30.pdf
3 sep 14, 23:09
JoseAngel: John Shade's poem 'Pale Fire' might be mentioned, too: http://www.washingtonpost.com/blogs/style-blog/wp/2014/08/25/edward-hirschs-gabriel-and-the-poetry-of-lamentation/
3 sep 14, 13:03
JoseAngel: No tiene precio, lo del moltunurapla, pero anda, que lo de los que lo votan...
3 sep 14, 12:52
JoseAngel: Los catetos que se lo llevan. Con el nivelico que gastan nuestros vecinos orientales: http://www.libertaddigital.com/opinion/pablo-molina/pujol-y-la-bruja-adelina-73326/
3 sep 14, 11:26
JoseAngel: Me citan en este artículo sobre "Tensiones de la etnografía virtual" http://labrechadigital.org/labrecha/virtual_alvarocuadra.pdf#page=70
3 sep 14, 10:44
JoseAngel: M citan en Autores: Sabine Lang Localización: La narración paradójica: normas narrativas y el principio de la transgresión / coord. por Nina Grabe, Sabine Lang, Klaus Meyer-Minnemann, 2006.
3 sep 14, 10:38
JoseAngel: Con las excelentes cifras de Rajoy, en 8 años estaremos en dos millones de parados. ¡Sigue así, machote! http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140903_z0_ELpais21.pdf
3 sep 14, 10:34
JoseAngel: Parece que me aceptan una publicación más en la serie Narratología, de De Gruyter, ¡albricias!
3 sep 14, 07:48
JoseAngel: Los 100 libros más vendidos de la historia: http://laslecturasdemrdavidmore.blogspot.com.es/2014/09/los-100-libros-mas-vendidos-del-mundo.html
3 sep 14, 06:41
JoseAngel: Un país en crisis total de valores y ciudadanía. Sólo el 16% de los españoles lo defenderían. Listos estamos para el desguace: http://www.elmundo.es/espana/2014/09/03/5406166822601ded528b45aa.html
3 sep 14, 06:10
JoseAngel: The Paris lecture: http://www.scoop.it/t/retrospection/p/4027349523/2014/09/03/vanity-fea-the-story-behind-any-story-the-paris-lecture
2 sep 14, 23:07
JoseAngel: ¿Pero será posible que estos estafadores del Gobierno convenzan a alguien con sus cifras cocinadas sobre el empleo? PUES SÍ. Así anda el país. ¡Hep, a despertaros, que estáis atontaos!
2 sep 14, 21:43
JoseAngel: Сегодня я потерял своего друга, который был всегда со мной... my self.
2 sep 14, 21:36
JoseAngel: Rajoy y el PP, enemigos de la ley del aborto de ZP, van para 300.000 abortos: http://www.hazteoir.org/alerta/62308-marchavida-2014-292-mil-abortos-llegada-rajoy?sid=Mjc4MzIyODM2OTczNDM1
2 sep 14, 13:04
JoseAngel: Veo que mi blog es, ante todo, un fotoblog: http://vanityfea.blogspot.com.es/search/label/Fotos
2 sep 14, 13:02
JoseAngel: Academia: 2213 document views in the last 30 days: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda/Analytics#/overview
2 sep 14, 07:42
JoseAngel: Myself According to Himself: Blog de notas de agosto 2014: http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/z14-8.html
 2 sep 14, 21:36
JoseAngel: Are We Real? http://youtu.be/fRzPM3FgF9I

1 sep 14, 00:00
JoseAngel: 'No tengo tiempo para estar enfermo'  fb.me/1kg2byMAF








 

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:28. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Blogs






L'Homme à la moto

lunes, 22 de septiembre de 2014

L'homme à la moto (2)

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:57. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías




Around Cynewulf

martes, 23 de septiembre de 2014

Around Cynewulf

From the chapter on "Anglo-Saxon Literature" in David Daiches's Critical History of English Literature:
ruthwell cross














































In the same manuscript that contains the two Genesis poems, Exodus and Daniel, there is found also an untitled religious poem which is now generally called Christ and Satan. This shows an Anglo-Saxon poet working not directly from biblical sources but from a variety of Christian traditions. Here we get a picture of Satan in Hell which represents him not as the defiant spirit of Genesis B but as a lost soul lamenting bitterly his exclusion from the joys of Heaven. He is given several speeches, each with considerable elegiac eloquence; the author is clearly concerned to emphasize the difference between Heaven and Hell and the different results of following Christ and following Satan. The latter part of the poem concentrates on Christ, though at the very end, after an account of Satan's temptation of Christ in the wilderness, we return to Satan in his frustration.

Christ and Satan seems to have been influenced by the school of Cynewulf, a poet who may have flourished early in the ninth century and who is the first Anglo-Saxon poet to sign his work (by means of runic letters woven into the poem). Four of Cynewulf's poems are extant, all showing a more self-conscious craftsmanship than is found in the Caedmonian poems and suggesting in style and structure the influence of classical models. The heroic strain, so successfully transplanted from the older poetry in such a poem as Exodus, is lacking in Cynewulf, and in its place we find a more meditative and contemplative tone. The four Anglo-Saxon Christian poems which have the name of Cynewulf worked into them in acrostic form are Christ, Juliana, Elene, and The Fates of the Apostles. All these poems possess both a high degree of literary craftsmanship and a note of mystical contemplation which sometimes rises to a high level of religious passion. The story of Christ as told in the poem of that title draws on a variety of ecclesiastical and patristic sources, but it handles its subject—the Advent, the Ascension, and the Last Judgment (5) —with an intensity all its own. The dialogue between Mary and Joseph in the first part, brief though it is, shows a real feeling for the dramatic situation, and is, besides, the earliest extant dramatic passage in English literature. Juliana is a more conventional work, a typical saint's life, following its Latin prose source without any significant deviation, while Elene is the story of the discovery of the true cross by St. Helena, mother of Constantine, told with a keen sense of the wonder of it all and a relish for the romantic suggestions of distant scenes and places. The Fates of the Apostles is a short poem of one hundred and twenty-two lines (and may be the concluding part of Andreas,  which it follows in the manuscript: if so, then Andreas, too, is by Cynewulf, for The Fates of the Apostles contains the runic signature). The author is here meditating on the adventures of the various apostles after they dispersed to spread the Gospel, but its interest for the modern reader lies largely in the personal passages. Its opening shows an interesting mutation of the heroic into the personal elegiac strain: "Lo, weary of wandering, sad in spirit, I made this song, gathered it from far and wide, of how the bright and glorious heroes showed forth their courage."

With Cynewulf, Anglo-Saxon religious poetry moves beyond biblical paraphrase into the didactic, the devotional, and the mystical. These qualities are also exhibited by many of the religious poems which seem to have been written under his influence. The most remarkable of these is The Dream of the Rood, fragments of which are to be found inscribed in runic letters on the Ruthwell Cross in Dumfriesshire, Scotland (probably an early eighth century version, pre-Cynewulf), while the complete poem exists in the Vercelli Book, in a much later version (probably late ninth century). The tone of the complete version as we have it suggests that the earlier version had been afterward adapted by a poet of the school of Cynewulf, perhaps even by Cynewulf himself. It is the oldest surviving English poem in the form of a dream or vision—a form which was later to be used for such a variety of purposes. The dreamer tells how he saw a vision of the bright cross, brilliantly adorned with gems, and goes on to tell the speech that he heard it utter. The speech of the cross, in which it tells of its origin in the forest, its removal to be made into a cross for "The Master of mankind," its horror at the role it had to play but its determination to stand fast because that was God's command, the suffering of "the young Hero" who ascends the cross resolutely in order to redeem mankind—all this is done in verse charged with a simple eloquence and sustaining a high note of religious passion and wonder. The speech ends with an exhortation to each soul to "seek through the cross the kingdom which is far from earth," and the poem then concludes with the dreamer's account of his own religious hopes. Other poems associated with the school of Cynewulf are Andreas, which tells of the adventures, sufferings, and evangelical successes of St. Andrew, with deliberate emphasis on the wonderful and the picturesque, and a perhaps excessive exploitation of the rhetorical devices of Anglo-Saxon poetry (the source of the poem is a Latin rendering of the apocryphal Greek Acts of Andrew and Matthew); two poems on the life of the English hermit St. Guthlac; The Phoenix, of which the first part, deriving from the Latin poem De Ave Phoenice, attributed to Lactantius, describes an earthly paradise in the East, the beauty of the phoenix, its flight to Syria after it has lived for a thousand years to build its nest, die, and be reborn, while the second half takes the phoenix as an allegory both of the life of the virtuous in this world and the next and as a symbol of Christ; and following The Phoenix in the Exeter Book—a poem entitled Physiologus or Bestiary which belongs to the popular medieval literary form of beast allegories, where real or (more often) imaginary qualities of animals are given a moral application. Physiologus, which derives ultimately from a Greek original, is incomplete, and deals with the panther, the whale and, incompletely, the partridge. It has the same lushness of descriptive style that is found in The Phoenix, and its natural history is equally fabulous. The whale is given the charming name of Fastitocalon—a corruption of Aspidochelone, originally applied to the turtle.

Finally, there falls to be mentioned among significant Anglo-Saxon religious poems the fragmentary Judith, of which only the concluding sections survive, in the same manuscript that contains Beowulf. The poem is a version of the Vulgate text of the apocryphal book of Judith, and the extant portion tells in vigorous and rapidly moving verse of Judith's beheading of the drunken Holofernes after his confident feasting, her rallying of the Hebrews to attack the Assyrians, the consternation of the Assyrians on discovering Holofernes' headless body, the rout of the Assyrians by the Hebrews, and Judith's triumph and praise to God. Judith possesses a fierce energy in describing the death of Holofernes and the defeat of the Assyrians, a note of positive jubilation, which is quite different from anything in the older heroic poetry. In fluidity of movement the verse form shows itself to be fairly late, and the poem may date from the end of the ninth century or possibly even later.


(5). Some scholars maintain that only the second part, to which they give the title of The Ascension (or Christ B) is by Cynewulf, for only this part contains Cynewulf's name in runic characters. The other two parts they consider to be seaparate poems, giving one the title of The Advent (or Natitivy, or Christ A) and the other the title of Doomsday C (or Christ C), grouping it together with two other poems on the Last Judgment which they call Doomsday A and Doomsday B respectively.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:59. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Adiós a Venecia

martes, 23 de septiembre de 2014

Adiós a Venecia


Adiós a Venecia

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:00. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Mi bibliografía sobre el auto

martes, 23 de septiembre de 2014

Mi bibliografía sobre el auto

Aquí reencuentro mi bibliografía sobre el auto- —sobre el autoconocimiento, autocontrol, autoengaño, etc. etc. Sobre automóviles también debo tener alguna. Pero si lo que buscan es una bibliografía sobre el self en el sentido de el yo personal, el sujeto que somos, etc., también está aquí, en mi Bibliografía de Teoría Literaria, Crítica, y Filología. ¿Y qué hace ahí? Es que hay quien dice que somos mucha literatura—y poca autocrítica.


Self-... by emankcin

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:01. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


La interfaz

martes, 23 de septiembre de 2014

La interfaz

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:03. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Murano en un día claro

martes, 23 de septiembre de 2014

Murano en un día claro

Murano en un día claro

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:05. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


La Lupe - Puro Teatro

miércoles, 24 de septiembre de 2014

La Lupe - Puro Teatro

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:06. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música








CFP Ecocriticism and Narrative Theory

miércoles, 24 de septiembre de 2014

CFP Ecocriticism and Narrative Theory

Call for Submissions
Ecocriticism and Narrative Theory: Essays at a Critical Confluence
We seek submissions for a volume that asks what connections exist between material environments and narrative forms of understanding. Scholars are increasingly drawing our attention to the importance of the stories we tell each other about the environment, such that narratives have become an implicit touchstone for the emerging field of the environmental humanities. This work positions narratives as important occasions and repositories for the values, political and religious ideas, and sets of behaviors that determine how we perceive and interact with our ecological homes. Changing the way we interact with the environment, scholars such as Val Plumwood and Ursula Heise suggest, requires new stories about the world in which we live.
Yet despite this connection, scholarship that puts into dialogue two of the relevant schools of literary criticism—narrative theory and ecocriticism—is scant. Despite the fact that both of these approaches to the study of literature and culture are well established, they appear to have said little to one another; Narrative, the flagship journal of narrative theory, has never featured a special issue focusing on the environment in narratives, and ISLE, the flagship journal of ecocriticism, has never featured a special issue exploring the role that narrative structures play in representations of the environment. After organizing well-attended and generative panels on possible intersections at the Association for the Study of Literature and the Environment (ASLE) 2013 and the International Society for the Study of Narrative (ISSN) 2014, the co-editors for this volume feel confident that interest abounds for a collection that bridges the work done by scholars in these subfields of literary study.
If these conversations remain in their infancy, is not because the two approaches lack overlapping interests. On the contrary, opportunities for cross-pollination abound. The vocabulary developed by narratologists could benefit certain ecocritical studies, especially in helping ecocritical scholars better account for the formal aspects of representations of environment in various types of narratives (novels, short stories, films, etc). Ecocritical insights could help to broaden narrative theory, particularly in strengthening the connection between text and extratextual world of interest to many postclassical narratologists and expanding the repertoire of questions narrative theorists ask of narratives. Also, both of these approaches have complicated the disciplinary or methodological line(s) between science and humanistic inquiry; can they learn from one another’s attempts? More broadly, how might an approach to reading that combines ecocritical and narratological lenses sophisticate the way we think about narratives within the environmental humanities? What new insights might ecocritical and narratological lenses provide to conversations within the environmental humanities? The co-editors are confident that both approaches can learn from the other but feel this multi-voiced collection would give momentum to questions of how.
Possible topics under consideration in this collection include but are not limited to:
-Access to nature alongside/versus access to narrative
-Animals as characters
-Chronotopes
-Evolutionary approaches to narrative/“evocriticism”
-Gendered/ecofeminist approaches to narrating natural experience
-Heteroglossia and the natural sciences
-Lyric narrative and forms of nature writing
-Mimesis and diegesis
-Narration, expectation, and natural experience
-Narrative and/as environmental rhetoric
-Narrative and ecocentrism
-Narrative and/of space or place
-Narrative as mediator of natural events (journalism, nature, and narrative)
-“Natural” and “Unnatural” narrative
-Natural disaster as plot device, deus ex machina
-New environmental narratives
-Pathetic fallacy as narratorial strategy
-Person and narration (first, third; omniscient, restricted) and nonhuman narrators and focalizers
-Referentiality and political context
-Role of nature in indigenous forms of narrative
-Spatialization and temporality in narrative
-Storyworlds as virtual environments
Please submit a 250-300 word abstract of your proposed chapter contribution and a short bio-blurb by e-mail to Erin James (ejames@uidaho.edu) and Eric Morel (egmorel@uw.edu) by January 15, 2015. Also include the working title of your chapter, 3–5 keywords, and the names and contact details for all authors.  
Final chapters of 6,000 – 7,000 words will be due September 30, 2015.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:11. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Donde la frontera

jueves, 25 de septiembre de 2014

Donde la frontera

Donde la frontera

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:12. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Reading 'The Monster'

 

 

viernes, 26 de septiembre de 2014

Reading 'The Monster'

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 22:14. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica




Todo listo para el referéndum escocés

 

miércoles, 17 de septiembre de 2014

Todo listo para el referéndum escocés

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:31. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. sin tema


Gran buque desde la reja

miércoles, 17 de septiembre de 2014

Gran buque desde la reja

Gran buque desde la reja

—del manicomio de Venecia.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:32. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. sin tema


Job for Narrative Theorist

jueves, 18 de septiembre de 2014

Job for Narrative Theorist

From the Narrative-L:
 
 
Dear narrative theory colleagues,
You might be interested to hear about the U of Chicago's job ad for a position that (excitingly and progressively, in my opinion) conceives narrative theory at the intersection of fiction studies, narrative across media, and creative writing:
Here's hoping that it's a Dream-Come-True Job (instead of just a Dream Job) for a talented young member of the community!
Best wishes,
Sarah
PS--the ad, in full:
Creative Writing: The Department of English invites applications for a tenure-track Assistant Professor of English specializing in 20th and 21st-century fiction, with an emphasis on narrative theory. We seek an outstanding scholar whose teaching will provide a critical and theoretical complement to recent fiction appointments in Creative Writing. There will be an opportunity to contribute to a high profile research group in contemporary cultural forms including scholars working on Comics and Video Games, as well as to engage with scholars working in earlier periods of Anglo-American and Anglophone fiction. This appointment is expected to begin Fall 2015. Conferral of Ph.D. by June 30, 2015 is highly preferred and Ph.D. degree must be conferred within one year of start date. Candidates must submit a cover letter, CV, and dissertation abstract online at the University of Chicago's Academic Career Opportunities website, for Posting number 02348: https://academiccareers.uchicago.edu Online applications must be completed before midnight Central Time on Monday, November 3, 2014. Position contingent upon final budgetary approval. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, national origin, age, protected veteran status or status as an individual with disability.The University of Chicago is an Affirmative Action / Equal Opportunity / Disabled / Veterans Employer.

Dr. Sarah Copland
Assistant Professor
Department of English
MacEwan University
6-229 City Centre Campus
10700-104 Avenue
Edmonton, AB
T5J 4S2
Tel.: (780) 497-5486

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:34. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Universidad






Nella Laguna Veneta

jueves, 18 de septiembre de 2014

Nella Laguna Veneta

Nella Laguna Veneta

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:38. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Escocia dice "No"

 

viernes, 19 de septiembre de 2014

Escocia dice "No"




y algunas reacciones al resultado, antes de la dimisión de Salmond.

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Viernes, 06 de Noviembre de 2015 21:40. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Política






Andando San Miguel 3

viernes, 26 de septiembre de 2014

Andando San Miguel 3

Andando San Miguel 3

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Sábado, 07 de Noviembre de 2015 17:22. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes




Habanera (4)

sábado, 27 de septiembre de 2014

Habanera (4)

Volvemos con la serie de "Nuestras Canciones Más Desconocidas" recuperando un éxito de 2010, la Habanera de Carmen.

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Sábado, 07 de Noviembre de 2015 17:27. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías




Rajoy, Groucho de sí

Rajoy, Groucho de sí. Sin Complejos (audio)

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Sábado, 07 de Noviembre de 2015 17:31. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Política


El Evangelio de Judas y la batalla por la realidad

sábado, 27 de septiembre de 2014

El Evangelio de Judas y la batalla por la realidad

Este artículo mío (que ahora reaparece por Scribd) lo escribí poco después de la publicación del desaparecido y reaparecido Evangelio de Judas, todavía no leído por más de un cristiano:

INPRO--2009-089 —El Evangelio de Judas y la batalla por la realidad.

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Sábado, 07 de Noviembre de 2015 17:34. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Ideología


Castilla la Vieja 2

lunes, 29 de septiembre de 2014

Castilla la Vieja 2

Castilla la Vieja 2

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Lunes, 09 de Noviembre de 2015 08:21. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Notas sobre VERDAD Y MÉTODO de H.-G. Gadamer

lunes, 29 de septiembre de 2014

Notas sobre VERDAD Y MÉTODO de H.-G. Gadamer

Reaparecidas ahora en Scribd. Ojo que son largas las notas.


SSRN-id2364913 by JOSE ANGEL GARCIA LANDA - Uploaded by sebastianmunozt

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La Grajera

domingo, 28 de septiembre de 2014

La Grajera

La Grajera

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Lunes, 09 de Noviembre de 2015 08:14. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


La Bohème (2)

domingo, 28 de septiembre de 2014

La bohème (2)

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Lunes, 09 de Noviembre de 2015 08:17. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías




George Herbert

lunes, 29 de septiembre de 2014

George Herbert

From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble:

Herbert, George (1593-1633), fifth son of Sir Richard and Magdalen Herbert and younger brother of Lord *Herbert of Cherbury, born in Montgomery into a prominent family. His father died when he was 3, and in 1608 his mother, the patron of Donne, remarried Sir John Danvers, who was 20 years her junior. Educated at Westminster School where he was named king's scholar, and Trinity College, Cambridge, George published his first poems (two sets of memorial verses in Latin) in a volume mourning Prince Henry's death in 1612. But he had already, according to his earliest biographer, I. *Walton, sent his mother at the start of 1610 a New Year's letter dedicating his poetic powers to God and enclosing two sonnets ('My God, where is that ancient heat towards thee?' and 'Sure, Lord, there is enough in thee to dry'). In 1616 he was elected a major fellow of Trinity, and in 1618 appointed reader in rhetoric. In 1620 he became public orator at the university (holding this distinguished position until his resignation in 1627). He seems at this period to have been rather pushing, keen on making the acquaintance of the great and conscious of his distinction of birth. F. *Bacon and Donne were among his friends, and the public oratorship introduced him to men of influence at court. Although he was obliged, by the terms of his fellowship, to take orders within seven years, he seems to have gravitated towards a secular career, leaving his university duties to be performed by proxies. In 1624, and again in 1625, he represented Montgomery in Parliament. This fairly brief experience of worldly ambition seems, however, to have disillusioned him. He was ordained deacon, probably before the end of 1624, and installed in 1616 as a canon of Lincoln Cathedral and prebendary of Leighton Bromswold in Huntingdonshire, near *Little Gidding, where *Ferrar, whom Herbert had known at Cambridge, had recently established a religious community. Once installed, Herbert set about restoring the the ruined church at Leighton. His mother died in 1627, and his Memoriae Matris Sacrum waas published in the volume containing Donne's commemoration sermon. In March 1629 Herbert married his stepfather's cousin, Jane Danvers, and they adopted two orphaned nieces of Herbert's. He became rector of Bemerton, near Salisbury, in April 1630, being ordained priest the following September. In his short priesthood he gained a reputation for humility, energy, and charity. He was also a keen musician, and would go twice a week to hear the singing in Salisbury Cathedral which was, he said, 'Heaven upon earth'. He died of consumption shortly before his 40th birthday. When he realized he was dying he sent his English poems to his friend Ferrar with instructions to publish them, if he though they might 'turn to the advantage of any dejected soul', and otherwise to burn them. The Temple, containing nearly all his surviving English poems, was published in 1633. Outlandish Proverbs (a collection of foreign proverbs in translation) in 1640, and Herbert's prose picture of the model country parson, A Priest to the Temple, in 1652, as part of Herbert's Remains. His translation of Luigi Cornaro's Trattato de la vita sobria appeared in 1634, and his 'Brief Notes' on Juan de Valdes's Hundred and Ten Considerations in 1638. He told Ferrar that his poems represented 'a picture of the many spiritual conflicts that have passed betwixt God and my soul'. They were much admired in the 17th cent. and 13 editions of The Temple came out between 1633 and 1679. In the 18th cent. Herbert went out of fashion, though J. *Wesley adapted some of his poems. The Romantic age saw a revival, and the appreciative note in Coleridge's Biographia Literaria (1817) enhanced Herbert's reputation. Modern critics have noted the subtlety rather than the simplicity of his poems, seeing them as an attempt to express the ultimately ineffable complications of the spiritual life. The precise nature of Herbert's relationship to Calvinism has also generated debate. See Works (ed. F. E. Hutchinson, 1941); Amy M. Charles, Life (1977).

—oOo—

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Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury

lunes, 29 de septiembre de 2014

Lord Edward Herbert of Cherbury

From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble.

HERBERT of Cherbury, Edward, Lord (1582-1648), elder brother of G. *Herbert, born at Eyton-on-Severn, Shropshire, into one of the foremost families of the Welsh border. In 1596, aged 14, he was enrolled as gentleman commoner at University College, Oxford. That year his father died, and Herbert became ward of Sir George Moore (later *Donne's father-in-law). At 16 he was married to his cousin Mary, daughter of Sir William Herbert of St Julians, five years Edward's senior and heiress to her father's estates in England, Wales and Ireland. By the time he was 21 the couple had had, he reports, 'divers children', of whom none survived him. He was created Knight of the Bath in 1603. His adventures are recounted by Herbert in his Life, a remarkable document, not least for its unabashed presentation of its author's martial valour, success with women, truthfulness, sweetness of breath, and other virtues. Herbert aspired to a career in public service and spent much of the time from 1608 to 1618 in France, getting to know the French aristocracy and court. He also travelled in Italy and the Low Countries, fighting at the siege of Juliers (1610).

In 1619 he became ambassador to France, on *Buckingham's recommendation. His most famous philosophical work, De Veritate, was published in Paris in 1624. He was recalled to London in 1624, where he unsuccessfully petitioned for high office. Although he joined Charles's council of war in 1629, becoming Baron Herbert of Cherbury, recognition still eluded him. To attract royal notice he wrote, in 1630, The Expedition to the Isle of Rhé, which tries to justify Buckingham's calamitous generalship, and in 1632 he began a detailed 'official' history of *Henry VIII's reign, assisted by Thomas Masters, which was published in 1649. At the outbreak of the Civil War he retired to Montgomery Castle and declined to become involved. The castle was threatened by Royalists in 1644, and he admitted a parliamentary garrison, under Sir Thomas Myddleton, in exchange for the return of his books, which had been seized. He moved to his London house in Queen Street, St Giles, and dedicated himself to philosophy, supplementing his De Veritate with De Causis Errorum and De Religione Laici, both published in 1645, and writing besides De Religione Gentilium and his autobiography (begun in 1643). In 1647 he visited Gassendi in Paris.

Herbert's De Veritate postulates that religion is common to all men and that, stripped of superfluous priestly accretions, it can be reduced to five universal innate ideas: that there is a God; that he should be worshipped; that virtue and piety are essential to worship; that man should repent of his sins; and that there are rewards and punishments after this life. It gained Herbert the title of father of English *Deism. It was widely read in the 17th cent., earning the attention and disagreement of Mersenne, Gassendi, *Descartes, and *Locke. Herbert also wrote poetry which is obscure and metrically contorted, evidently influence by his friend Donne, but he also wrote some tender and musical love lyrics. (See also METAPHYSICAL POETS.)

Life, ed. S. Lee (1886, rev. 1906), and ed. J. M. Shuttleworth (1976); Poems English and Latin, ed. G. C. Moore Smith (1923); De Veritate, ed. and trans. M. H. Carré (1937); De Religione Laici, ed. and trans. H. R. Hutcheson (1944); R. D. Bedford, The Defence of Truth (1979).

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MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers

martes, 30 de septiembre de 2014

MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers

Me avisa un compañero de que aparezco en la séptima edición del MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers: "Estaba ojeando la séptima edición del MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers (...) y me encuentro que en la pág. 185 ponen tu bibliografía como ejemplo para citar material de Internet. No sólo la mencionan, sino que hay una gran ilustración de la página inicial e indicaciones para efectuar citas y referencias." ¡Albricias y otras palabras alegres!

He encontrado un PDF de este manual aquí: MLA Handbook for Writers of Research Papers, 7th ed.

Y el pantallazo es inevitable.

 

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Martes, 10 de Noviembre de 2015 08:36. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica




Leave Not a Rack Behind

miércoles, 8 de octubre de 2014

Leave Not a Rack Behind

 

Un pasaje de Shakespeare que hemos visto hoy en clase, de La Tempestad.  Donde habla Prospero del fin del universo, que desaparecerá igual que desaparece una obra de la escena—y no quedará ni el recuerdo de nada de lo que fue—de lo que es y será. Incluidos nosotros, los que heredamos el mundo.

Our revels now are ended. These our actors,
As I foretold you, were all spirits and
Are melted into air, into thin air:
And, like the baseless fabric of this vision,
The cloud-capp'd towers, the gorgeous palaces,
The solemn temples, the great globe itself, 
Ye all which it inherit, shall dissolve
And, like this insubstantial pageant faded,
Leave not a rack behind. We are such stuff
As dreams are made on, and our little life
Is rounded with a sleep.

 




Es también un pasaje interesante para discutir en relación con la naturaleza mental de la realidad—la realidad como realidad mental, un sistema retroalimentado de percepción, que necesita por tanto de un espectador, y no siempre lo tendrá, como un libro que no se lee.


 ______


Aquí un audio sobre el Big Bang y el futuro final del Universo—nuestra actual versión de esta historia.







—oOo— 
 

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Altos de Loira

jueves, 9 de octubre de 2014

Altos de Loira


Altos de Loira

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 18:25. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Telling Stories to Ourselves

jueves, 9 de octubre de 2014

Telling Stories to Ourselves

A contribution to a thread on "story" and "narrative" by William Fear et al., on the Narrative-L:

One can also "see a story" in a given situation, the moment one interprets it as having a narrative structure, as being tellable (in whatever form). Potential communication, the potential articulation of a story is "always already" narrative, because we are inherently communicative and social beings, Our ability to tell narratives, and even our ability to "see" narratives in situations or states of affairs has much to do with this sociality which is internalized, we are always in dialogue with a potential receiver, to make the story clear to him or her, even if that receiver is sometimes just another part of our brain, a role we play in self- interaction.


W.J. fear answers:

Interesting and I'll try if you can provide evidence to support your statement '...other living beings are notoriously bad at communicating
narrative patterns...'  WHat is the basis of this statement and what is the evidence for this?  All the evidence I am aware of from work with Bees up to what we falsely refer to as 'higher mammals' suggests that they are expert in communicating narrative patterns through a wide variety of means - indeed, in many cases probably through more means than humans.  So I'd be interested to know the basis of you statement and interested to see the challenges it presents to my understanding and the evidence I am aware of.

I don't want to go into huge explanations here - actually I do but the list is not really the place so I'll see if I can provide a simple example.

An acorn falls to the ground.  It germinates (inciting incident). It has a branch broken, it survives storms and droughts (rising conflict).  It becomes an adult tree (middle).  During this time nothing much happens.  It becomes older.  More droughts.  the landscape changes (conflict continues to rise).   A big storm.  (Climax).  Tree is blown over. It struggles to survive but in the end loses that struggle (resolution of events).  it decays.  little trees grow form the acorns (denouement).

The pattern is there.  There is purpose without human intervention etc etc.

Importantly, the objects leave traces that show a pattern regardless of the existence of humans and the constructs imposed upon that pattern of marks.

If someone comes along and cuts across the grain of the fallen tree they can read the sequence of events left as traces. etc. etc.

If the tree comes to an end 'before its time' so to speak then that is a case of foreclosure, which is a naturally occurring risk.

While we cannot be certain of the natural life span of all objects, and especially not of objects we assume to be non-sentient, we know that all objects have life spans and some are distinctive.

And so on and so forth but that drifts into discussion from the example and becomes extended.

—And I reply:

William, in your acorn example, most of the narrativity comes from the implied observer's viewpoint—which is ourselves, not a tree. There are natural processes involved, we can identify sequences of events, etc., but they become a story (or indeed "events" in one) from the moment there is a human mind involved. Lower minds may process simpler patterns of relationships—e.g. a bee knows nothing about the growth of trees—but at a very elementary level. Bees are indeed an interesting case, being able to convey information about objects not immediately present, but by no stretch of the term can they be said to be "narrating" their experience to other bees. Indeed the flowers etc. they refer to are in a way bodily present since the bees only indicate a direction and distance. Though I agree we need to know more about animal communication, the onus of the proof rests with you, who seem to assume animals tell stories to one another—not with me!  I think it is usually agreed that animals have feelings, emotions, intentions, etc., which are ingredients for the emergence of story, but what they lack is a sign system which allows them to articulate stories. They do have sign systems which allow them to do other things, send signals, etc.—but they can't refer to the past, or to the future, in their communications. At least I know of no experiment in animal psychology which shows an animal telling a story to another animal, or to a human. Far from being common knowledge and pervasive, what you seem to assume about animal communication is not in the least part of the consensus—at least among students of communication!


On another example of "natural narrative"—the growth rings in a tree as "a record" of a previous process:

There is a potential for story in the tree rings, but the telltale word is "record". They are not a record of anything unless they are interpreted by someone as being a record. Therefore the implied (human) observer keeps creeping in... such stories without humans are actually elements within a fully humanized (i.e. semiotized) world, which is at the very basis of their possibility of meaning.


Noam Scheindlin adds a significant contribution:

I suppose that the question is less that of the proverbial tree falling in the forest, but rather, that what constitutes a story can only be construed through the act of observation, and of delimiting the frame.  We could think of a story in the sense that Heidegger traces the etymology of the word "thing" [Ding, Res, Causa] as that which concerns humans in some respect, that which is talked about.  So, what happens (the tree creating its rings) only becomes something to talk about when a relation is perceived, when there is someone to care.  So, I would say, there's no story without someone to tell it, some narrative agency.  The story, then, is the story of this relation, of this why it is important to tell.

Narrative, and the willful act of narration, then, would be the act of telling the story.  This, it seems, is inherent in the various distinctions that have been made (though all with somewhat different emphasis) between fabula and syuzhet; story and discourse (Chatman); or the threefold distinctions that Genette and Bal make from out of this, etc.

Narration, then, would take its position as a perspective on the story, indeed one possibility of telling the story (Queneu's Exercises in Style is an excellent depiction of this).  This, it seems to me would be the case even when the narrative produces the story in the telling.  From the perspective of the narrative, the narration remains anterior/exterior to the story. 

So when someone asks you to "tell me the story of" x, rather than, "tell me the narrative of" x  (the question that Matthew Clark brought up), it is because the story is understood to be already in existence.  What one is being asked to do then is to narrate (a perspective on) a story.

This doesn't seem to me to change when the observer becomes the object of his or her observations, turning his or her acts of observations into objects: the frame between teller and told, perceiver and perceived, remains intact, as the locus of observation shifts.  One could think of homodiegetic narration as the realm where this issue is brought to the forefront, but also why such structures as Lejeune's autobiographical pact come into play.

I associated narrative with "possibility" then, because, ultimately, one can never step out of the frame of one's own story in order to tell it, and when we do, in order to try to tell it anyway, what it yields, is a possible world (see the work of Thomas Pavel and M-L. Ryan).  Thus, fiction.





—oOo—

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'Metaphysical' Religious Poetry: Herbert, Crashaw, and Vaughan

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'Metaphysical' Religious Poetry: Herbert, Crashaw, and Vaughan


From The Short Oxford History of English Literature, by Andrew Sanders:

The picturesque emotionalism of continental baroque art was a central feature of the Counter-Reformation crusade to win back the hearts and souls of those lost to the Roman Church by the fissures of the Reformation. Protestant England remained largely untouched by the more heady pictorial and architectural styles sponsored by the Pope's main agents in the campaign, the Jesuits, but, despite gestures of resistance and disapproval, a degree of Jesuit spirituality left its mark on English literature. The martyred missionary priest, Robert Southwell (?1561-95, canonized in 1970), managed to work secretly for nine perilous years in England before his execution; his books circulated far less secretly. The prose meditation, Marie Magdalens Funeral Teares, which was published in 1591, ran through some seven further editions by 1636, and the two collections of verse, Saint Peters complaynt, with other Poems  and Moeoniae: or, Certaine excellent Poems and Spiritual Hymnes, both of which contain poems written during his three-year imprisonment, were printed in London in the year of his death. Southwell's poems were respected both by Roman Catholics and byAnglicans, the extraordinarily contrived Christmas meditation, 'The Burning Babe', being particularly admired by Ben Jonson. Donne, the author of the scurrilous anti-Jesuit tract Ignatius His Conclave of 1611 and who eight years later feared for his safety at the hands of 'such adversaries, as I cannot blame for hating me' when he travelled across Germany, was none the less influenced by the kind of meditative religious exercises recommended to the faithful by the founder of the Society of Jesus. St. Ignatius Loyola's Spiritual Exercises had been approved by the Pope in 1648 as a manual of systematic devotion which employed sense impressions, the imagination, and the understanding as a means of prompting the spirit to consider the lapsed human and the glorious divine condition. The Ignatian method was not unique (it drew on late medieval precedents and it was developed by later Spanish and French churchmen) but its currency was assured by the missionary and educational work undertaken by the Jesuits. The fact that such regulated guides to meditation could be used privately meant that they appealed, with varying degrees of excision, to secluded Recusants, devout Anglicans, and soul-searching Puritans alike.

A similar spiritual cross-fertilization is evident in the popularity of emblem books in seventeenth-century England. The emblem consisted of three interrelated parts—a motto, a symbolic picture, and an exposition—each of which suggested a different means of vconsidering and apprehending a moral or religious idea. The form had had a certain currency as a learned, and generally secular, educational device in the sixteenth century, but its renewed applivation to private relisious study and its intermixture of Latin motto, biblical quotation, engraved and ostensibly enigmatic picture, and English poem made for a widespread influence which readily cut across confessional barriers. Francis Quarles's Emblemes, Divine and Morall (1635) proved to be the most popular book of verse of its age. Quarles (1592-1644) and his engraver took and, where Protestant occassion demanded, adapted plates from Jesuit emblem books; only the disappointingly pedestrian accompanying poems were original. Emblemes and its successor Hieroglyphicks of the Life of Man (1638) demand that the reader interpret and gradually unwind an idea which is expressed epigrammatically, visually, and poetically. 'The embleme is but a silent parable', Quarles insisted in his address to the user of his books, and he goes on to suggest the importance of the linkage of word and picture: 'Before the knowledge of letters, God was knowne by Hieroglyphicks; And indeed, what are the Heavens, the Earth, nay every Creature, but Hieroglyphicks and Emblemes of his Glory?' The moral message is, however, predominantly one which stresses a conventionally Christian contempt for the world ('O what a crocodilian world is this / Compos'd of treach'ries, and insnaring wiles', 'O whither will this mad-brain world at last / Be driven? Where will her restless wheels arrive?'), and the pictures variously show children confusing a wasps' nest for a beehive in a globe, fools sucking at a huge earth-shaped breast, and a figure of vanity smoking a pipe while perched perilously on a tilting orb.

The intellectual demands made on a reader by an emblem book were paralleled by the wit, the imaginative picturing, the compression, the often crytic expression, the play of paradoxes, and the juxtapositions of metaphor in the work of Donne and his immediate followers, the so-called 'metaphysical poets'. The use of the term 'metaphysical' in this context was first given critical currency by Samuel Johnson in the eighteenth century and it sprang from an unease, determined by 'classical' canons of taste, with the supposed contortions of the style and imagery of Donne and Cowley. Johnson had a particular distaste for the far-fetched strained 'conceits' (witty and ingenious ideas) in which Donne's poetry abounds. This prejudice against the distinct 'metaphysical' style had earlier been shared by Quarles, who in 1629 complained of 'the tyranny of strong lines, which . . . are the meere itch of wit; under the colour of which many have ventured . . . to write non-sense'. The work of Donne's friend, admirer, and fellow-priest, George Herbert (1593-1633), possesses a restrained and contemplative rapture which is paralleled less by the extravagances of southern European baroque art than by the often enigmatic paintings of his French contemporary, Georges de la Tour. Herbert's own 'itch of wit' can none the less find its expression in playing with the shapes and sounds of words: he puns in his title to 'The Collar' and with the name 'Jesu' in the poem of that name he teases letters in his 'Anagram of the Virgin Marie'; in 'Heaven' he exploits echo-effects as delightedly as did his Venetian musical contemporaries, and he gradually reduces words to form new ones in 'Paradise'. His relationship to the emblem book tradition is evident in his printing of certain of his poems as visual designs (the shapes of 'The Altar' and the sideways printed 'Easter Wings' make patterns which suggest their subjects). If he is a less frenetic and startling poet than Donne, he is a far more searching and inventive one than Quarles. The two poems called 'Jordan' (from the fount of their inspiration) describe the act of writing a sacred poetry which eschews a structural 'winding stair' and the 'curling with metaphors' of a 'plain intention'. As with his most influential models, the parables of Jesus, Herbert's illustrations of the central mysteries of God and his creation take the form of sharply observed but 'plain' stories drawn from, and illuminated by, everyday experience.

The elegance of Herbert's poetry is as much the result of art as it is an expression of a cultivated, but not forced, spiritual humility. He had been born into a distinguished and cultured noble family but his decision to take deacon's orders in 1626, and his ordination to the priesthood and appointment as rector of a country parish in 1630 struck many of his grand contemporaries as a deliberate turning of his back on secular ambition. According to Izaak Walton, Herbert responded to a friend who taxed him with taking 'too mean an employment, and too much below his birth' that 'the Domestick Servants of the King of Heaven, should be of the noblest Families on Earth'. He would, he insisted, make 'Humility lovely in the eyes of all men'. Herbert's work is permeated with reference to service and to Christ as the type of the suffering servant, but his poetry is equally informed by a gentlemanly grasp of the chivalric code of obligation. Society, as we glimpse it in this world and the next, is hierarchical and ordered, and the human response to God's love can be expressed in terms of an almost feudal obligation. In 'The Pearl', for example, the poet insists that he knows 'the wayes of Honour, what maintains / The quick returns of courtesie and wit'. In the first of the poems called 'Affliction' he describes a changing understanding of service to a liege-lord, a service which at first gives rich satisfaction ('Thy glorious household-stuffe did me entwine') and brings rewards('thou gav'st me milk and sweetness; I had my wish and way'); as a process of disillusion sets in, the poem allows a sense of betrayal to surface, but this in turn is transformed by the final  insistence on an obligation shaped not by duty but by the more pressing demands of love ('Ah my deare God! though I am clean forgot, / Let me not love thee, if I love thee not'). 'Redemption' describes a tenant's search for his 'rich Lord' only to find him mortally wounded amid 'a ragged noise and mirth / Of theeves and murderers'; the magnanimity of the Lord is proved in a dying gesture of assent to the tenant's request. In 'The Collar' the remarkable evocation of impatient resistance to service ens as the 'raving' protests subside in response to the steady call of Christ. The call to the 'Child' (perhaps here both the disciple and a youth of gentle birth) evokes the willing reply 'My Lord'.

Herbert's vocation as a priest of the Church of England, and his loyalty to its rituals, calendar, and discipline is central both to his prose study of the ideal country parson, A Priest to the Temple (published in The Remaines of that Sweet Singer of the Temple George Herbert in 1652), and to his Latin sequence Musae Responsariae (1633) (poems which assert the propriety of Anglican ceremonial and orders in the face of Puritan criticism). It is however, in The Temple, the influential collection of his English poems published posthumously in 1633, that Herbert most fully expresses his aspirations, failures, and triumphs as a priest and as a believer. Sections of The Temple are shaped according to the spiritual rhythms and the ups and downs of religious experience. More significantly, the volume as a whole possesses both an architectonic and a ritual patterning which derives from the shape of an English parish church and from the festivals and feasts celebrated within its walls. The whole work is prefaced by a gnomic poetic expression of conventional moral advice to a young man. The title of this preliminary poem, 'The Church-Porch', serves as a reminder not only of a preparatory exercise before worship but also of the physical importance of the porch itself (once the setting of important sections of certain church services). The titles of poems in the body of the volume ('The Church') imply both a movement through the building noting its features ('The Altar', 'Chruch Monuments', 'Church-lock and key', 'The Church-floore', 'The Windows') and the significance of its liturgical commemorations ('Good Friday', 'Easter', 'H. Baptisme', 'The H. Communion', 'Whitsunday', 'Sunday', 'Christma'). Interspersed are meditations on Christian belief and the varied expeerience of the Christian life. The 'sacramental' poems have a particular importance. By means of repeated words and phrases 'Aaron' establishes a balanced contrast between the ceremonially vested Jewish priest and his spiritually defective modern Christian counterpart. The poem's debate is determined by an exploration of the import of the words 'Holiness to the Lord' engraved on Aaron's ceremonial mitre. It is only when Christ himself is recognized as the true sanctifier of the parish priest that all unworthiness falls away and the vested minister can properly present himself to his congregation, ready to celebrate the Holy Communion: 'Come people; Aaron's drest'. The theology and typology of eucharistic celebration are also explored in 'The Agonie' and the concluding poem of the volume, 'Love III'. 'The Agonie' takes as its central issue the human study of Sin and Love. The effect of Sin is revealed in an agonized Christ 'so wrung with pains, that all his hair, / His skinne, his garments bloudie be'. The very hyperbole here allows for the conceit on which the poem turnes; Sin is a wine-press painfully proving the worth of Love and when in the concluding stanza the crucified Christ's blood flows from his side it is mystically perceived as sacramental wine: 'Love is that liquour sweet and most divine, / Which my God feels as bloud; but I, as wine'. Bitterness is transubstantiated into sweetness. 'Love' takes the form of a colloquy in which the Lord, personified as Love, welcomes the sinner to his feast, insistently answering each protest of unworthiness with a gentle assertion of his grace:

And know you not, sayes Love, who bore the blame?
      My deare, then I will serve.
You must sit downe, sayes Love, and taste my meat:
      So I did sit and eat.


The uneasy guest and the would-be servant are entertained as equals.

Throughout The Temple the quekings of fear, the doubts, and the attempts at rebellion are subsumed in a quiet loyalty inspired by the love of a generous God. Restlessness, as seen in the deftly argued parrable of free will, 'The Pulley', prompts the soul to seek heavenly comfort. In 'Affliction III' the very utterance of the heaved sigh 'O God!' is interpreted as a barely recognized sign of redemption and as an admission of shared sorrow ('Thy life on earth was grief, and thou art still / Constant unto it'). Even the figure of Death, in the poem of that name, loses its skeletal terrors by being transformed by the sacrifice of Christ into something 'fair and full of grace, / much in request, much sought for as a good'. Herbert's 'Prayer before Sermon', appended to A Priest to the Temple, addresses a God who embodies 'patience, and pity, and sweetness, and love', one who has exalted his mercy above all things and who has made salvation, not punishment, his glory.

According to Izaac Walton's account, the dying Herbert entrusted the manuscript of his poems to his pious friend Nicholas Ferrar (1592-1637) who in 1625 had retired to his estate at Little Gidding in Huntingdonshire to establish a 'Little Colledge', or religious community of men and women, dedicated to the 'constant and methodical service of God'. Ferrar was instructed that he would find in The Temple 'a picture of the many Conflicts that have past betwixt God and my Soul' and he was allowed to choose whether to publish or burn the manuscript. As his short preface of 1633 indicates, he clearly recognized both the quality of the poems and their significance to the increasingly beleaguered discipline of the Church of England. Although his community impressed Charles I, it steadily provoked the hostility of those Puritans who criticized it as an 'Arminian Nunnery' and who in 1646 finally succeeded in breaking it up.

Richard Crashaw (1613-49) was, through his friendship with Ferrar, a regular visitor and keeper of vigils at Little Gidding. He was the son of a particularly zealous Puritan 'Preacher of Gods worde' who had made himself conspicuous as an anti-Papist. Crashaw's own religious pilgrimage was to take him in an opposite direction to his father. As a student of Cambridge and later as a fellow of Peterhouse he closely associated himself with the extreme Laudian party in the University. Deprived of his fellowship after the college chapel, to which he had contributed fittings, was desecrated by Parliamentary Commissionners in 1643 he travelled abroad, eked out a precarious existence on the fringes of Queen Henrietta Maria's court in exile, and ended his short life as the holder of a small benefice at the Holy House at Loreto in Italy. His English poetry—collected as Steps to the Temple: Sacred Poems, with other Delights of the Muses (1646, considerably expanded 1648) and later as Carmen Deo Nostro (published in Paris in 1652)—clearly shows the nature of his religious inclinations, both Anglican and Roman. The Preface to his earlier volumes proclaims his allegiance to the English Church through reference to Lancelot Andrewes and through the claim that the poems were written as 'Stepps for happy soules to climbe heaven by' under a 'roofe of Angels' at Little St Mary's Church in Cambridge; the 1652 volume more assiduously advertises the Catholic piety which had been only implicit before, and offers an apology, probably not Crashaw's own, for the 'Hymn to Saint Teresa' as 'having been writ when the author was yet among the protestants'. The frontispice to the 1648 volume showed the faithful mounting steps to a chastely decorous English church; the 1652 edition is decorated throughout with lushly Catholic devotional images.

Although the title Steps to the Temple nods back to Herbert, and though the volume contains a particularly fulsome tribute to 'the Temple of Sacred Poems, sent to a Gentlewoman', Crashaw's stylistic and structural debt to his model is limited. Crashaw is the most decoratively baroque of the English seventeenth-century poets, both in the extravagance of his subject-matter and in his choice of metaphor. Where Donne is ingenious and paradoxical, or Herbert delicately and aptly novel, Crashaw propels traditional Christian images until they soar and explode like sky-rockets or inflates them until they burst like plump confections. His verse exhibits a fixation with the human body and with bodily fluids: tears gush from eyes, milk from breasts, blood from wounds, and at times the emissions become intermixed expressions of passionate emotion. The series of 'Divine Epigrams' suggests a particular fondness for miraculous or alchemical changes of substance: not only does water become wine, or wine blood, but tears are pearls and drops of blood rubies; the water of Christ's baptism 'is washt it selfe, in washing him'; the water with which Pilate washes his hands is 'Nothing but Teares; Each drop's a teare that weeps for her own wast'; the naked Lord on the cross is clothed by 'opening the purple wardrobe of thy side'; and the blood of the Holy Innocents is both blended with milk and translated heavenwards. A similar, surreal vision informs the triumphantly hyperbolic meditation on the Magdalen, 'The Weeper'. The tears of the penitent flow unceasingly; transformed into stars they form not simply a Milky Way in the heavens but a stream of cream from which 'a briske Cherub something sips / Whose soft influence / Adds sweetnesse to his sweetest lips'.

Crashaw's attraction to the history and the writings of the great Spanish mystic, Teresa of Avila, who was canonized in 1622, is a further reflection of his interest in highly charged religious emotion. In her spiritual autobiography Teresa had described the climax of her most celebrated vision of union with God in which she had become aware of the presence of an angel bearing a great golden spear tipped with fire; this he plunged several times into her hart. Teresa's amorous language in expressing her awareness of a 'gentle . . . wooing which takes place between God and the soul' clearly had its effect on Crashaw's luxuriant meditation first entitled 'In Memory of the Vertuous and Learned Lady Madre de Teresa that sought an early Martyrdome' and now generally known as 'A Hymn to Saint Teresa' from the abbreviation of its more explicitly Catholic title of 1652. The poem returns repeatedly to the idea of divine love as the wooer and arouser of the faithful soul; the 6-year-old seeking martyrdom is glimpsed as 'her weake breast heaves with strong desire', while the adult nun willingly opens herself as 'Loves victim' pierced not simply by a single seraphic dart, but exposed to a whole troop of armed Angels, 'Loves souldiers' who 'exercise their Archerie'. Teresa's vision of the spear reappears in a new guise in Crashaw's address to the Countess of Denbigh 'perswading her to Resolution in Religion' (in fact a plea to resolve herself into the Roman communion). The Countess is instructed to unfold herself like a flower in order to receive 'love's shower' which will fall like 'the wholesomes dart', a 'healing shaft which heavn till now / Hath in love's quiver hid for you'. The most florid expression of Crashaw's earlier Laudian ideal of worshipping the Lord in the beauty and dignity of holiness is the 'Hymn to the Name of Jesus'. This ceremonious paean to the 'Fair KING OF NAMES' draws its impulses from a long tradition of devotion to the incarnate Word, both biblical and mystical. The poem insists on the daily renewal of worship through the reawakening of the mind and the senses, and it particularly stresses the importance of music, the 'household stuffe of Heavn on earth', as an accompaniment to praise. Crashaw's sensitivity to music, also evident in his richly adjectival representation of instrumental sound and bird-song in 'Musicks Duell' (an elaboration of a Latin poem by the Jesuit, Strada), is here expressed in his deliberate echoes of musical phrasing. The 'Hymn to the Name of Jesus' recognizes an interrelationship between natural and musical harmony in which the vocal human heart plays its part in an 'unbounded All-imbracing SONG', but it also requires the heart to open itself, even in agony, to the promptings of divine love. The martyr's love-death no longer requires a seraphic dart, for the 'Rackes & Torments' of the earthly persecutors of true religion force open the human breast and cleave the heart ready for the reception of Heavenly fire. Pleasure and pain, orgasm and martyrdom, rape and resolution are yoked together by a lexical violence which seeks to express ultimate spiritual fulfilment.


Where Crashaw yearns to represent an interior mystical passion through sensual metaphors drawn from the exterior human world, Henry Vaughan (1621-95) returns to the chaster and more private world of George Herbert as a means of articulating an inner sense of wonder. The subtitle of Vaughan's Silex Scintillans (1650, enlarged 1655), 'Sacred Poems and Private Ejaculations', is an exact echo of that of The Temple, and the Preface, dated 1654, refers to 'the blessed man, Mr George Herbert, whose holy life and verse gained many pious converts' (amongst whom Vaughan counted himself). Above all, one of the most Herbertian poems in the collection, 'The Match', represents a personal submission, artistically to a model poet and spiritually to that poet's God:

Dear friend! whose holy, ever-living lines,
                Have done much good
        To many, and have checkt my blood,
My fierce, wild blood that still heaves, and inclines,
                But still is tam'd
         By those bright fires which thee inflam'd;
Here I joyn hands, and thrust my stubborn heart
                 Into thy deed.

Vaughan most differs from Herbert, however, in his consistent rather than incidental use of natural imagery and in his steady exploration of the revelation of God in his creation. As a loyal royalist and Anglican writing at the time of the triumph of republican arms and the imposition of an alien church order, he retired to rural seclusion in Wales. That this retirement was sympathetic to him is suggested by his translations from the Latin of the stoic meditations on the flux of worldly affairs of Boethius and the Polish Jesuit, Casimir Sarbiewski (published in Olor Iscanus, 'the Swan of Usk', in 1651). Vaughan's finest devotional poetry, contained in the two volumes of Silex Scintillans, does, however, suggest a quite individual vision of a pastoral paradise which had been glimpsed in childhood, but which once lost to the adult could be regained only thorugh contemplation and revelation. 

Despite its dominant mood of serenity, Silex Scintillans is periodically charged with a subversive energy directed against the new political and religious status quo imposed by Parliament. The poem 'Abel's Blood' ostensibly protests at the blood shed by the first murderer and, by implication, at the crucifixion of Christ, but the complaint 'What thunders shall those men arraign / Who cannot count those they have slain,  / Who bathe not in a shallow flood, / But in a deep, wide sea of blood' seems also likely to be a barbed reference to a parliamentary army who had not only waged a civil war but then proceeded to execute the King, the earthly governor of the Church. In 'The World' the 'darksome States-man' who feeds on churches and altars  may equally be a reference to Cromwell, and in 'The British Church' the soldiers who 'here / Cast in their lots again' seem to be rending the seamless robe that once was the Church. The references in the titles o poems to the major feast-days of the Prayer Book Calendar ('Christ's Nativity', 'Easter-day', 'Ascension-day', 'White Sunday', 'Trinity Sunday') are also an Anglican assertion of the propriety of marking particular festivals in opposition to an official ban. The uncertainties, insecurities, and redefinitions of the political world would seem to have driven Vaughan in on himself and to an expression of an alternative spirituality. He looks less to a temple built with human hands than to open-air sanctuaries such as the tabernacles of the patriarchs of Israel. God is evident in numinous landscapes where angels discourse with men in sacred groves (in the poem 'Religion' the 'leaves thy spirit doth fan' are also the pages of the Bible). The true worship of God is expressed in a sense of harmony with observed Nature, the 'great Chime / And Symphony of nature' of 'The Morning-watch'. When in 'The Search' Christ is sought for at the sites associated with his earthly life, the pilgrim is bidden to look beyond the 'old elements or dust' and to find him in 'another world'. Vaughan seems to have responded particularly to the story of the patriarch Jacob, who had dreamed of an angelic ladder while resting on a stone pillow at Bethel, who had wrestled with an angel at Peniel, and at whose well at Sychar Jesus had spoken to the Samaritan woman of the water of life. Jacob's attributes—wells, fountains, stones, and angel-haunted groves—figure throughout his religious verse, notably in the extraordinary poem 'Regeneration', which Vaughan placed early in the first part of Silex. The poem traces and interrelationship of natural, biblical, and intenral landscapes, the exploration of one leading inexorably to another as the spiritual pilgrim probes the mysterious workings of grace. The divine breath called for in the poem's last lines takes up yet another biblical reference, one that is explained by the quotation from the Song of Solomon appended to it: 'Arise O north, and come thou south-wind, and blow upon my garden, that the spices thereof may flow out.' The secluded garden of the soul is stirred and quickened by the spirit of life itself. 

Silex Scintillans ('the sparkling flint') bears on its title-page an emblem of a flashing flint struck by a thunderbolt from the hand of  God; the flint is shaped like a weeping or a bleeding heart and it flames as the ligtning falls. Vaughan's emblem is variously explained: a Latin poem which prefaces the volume draws out Ezekiel's prophecy that God will 'take the stony heart out of their flesh, and will give them a heart of flesh', but the personal application of the idea to the poet is twofold. His own comment that 'Certaine Divine Raies breake out of the Soul in adversity, like sparks of fire out of the afflicted flint' illuminates the dominant idea, but the actual choice of a flint was determined by a Latin pun on 'silex' and on the name of the ancient British tribe from which Vaughan claimed descent, the Silures. 'The Silurist', as the poet habitually styled himself, sees himself as made vocal by adversity. His Church and his political cause are devastated, and, as the nine untitled poems interspersed in his two volumes suggest, the death of friends has disturbed his peace of mind. These elegiac verses often suggest the dragging movement of time and the painful counting of its passage ('Each day is grown a dozen year, / and each houre, one'; 'Silence, and stealth of dayes! 'tis now / Since thou art gone, / Twelve hundred houres') but their mourning mood is variously checked; internal qualifications bring consolation and individual poems relate not only to each other but to the titled poems which surround them. The 'pearl' discovered in 'Silence and stealth of dayes' is Christ's 'pearl of great price' which outwights all other value; the roots that sleep in the wintry soil of 'I walkt the other day' are to bring forth new life in an eternal spring; the sense of lonely exile in 'They are all gone into the world of light!' is transformed by the investigation of a series of conceits (death as a jewel shining in the night, an empty bird's nest, a dream of angels, a star confined in a tomb) which serve to 'disperse these mists, which blot and fill / My perspective'. The dispersal of gloom is elswwhere taken as a central metaphor for revelation. 'The Morning-watch' welcomes the floods of light as a foretaste of heaven; 'The Dawning' recognizes that dawn is 'the only time / That with thy glory doth best chime' and therefore the fittest time to mediatate on the Second Coming; Eternity ostensibly glimpsed with such wonderful casualness in 'The World' is like 'a great Ring of pure and endless light' in which 'the world / and all her train were hurl'd'. Where in 'The Night' Vaughan describes the nocturnal visit of Nicodemus to Jesus, he plays with a series of contrasts between light and darkness, waking and sleeping, education and oblivion. The poem centres on a pun and a paradox: at midnight Nicodemus seees both the Son and the Sun and his enlightenment consists of an insight into the mystery of God's 'deep, but dazling darkness'. It is a night into which Vaughan's poetry consistently peers.

Henry King's meditations on mortality and eternity lack the often electrifying originality of Vaughan's. As Dean of Rochester Cathedral in 1642, King (1592-1669) had his library destroyed and his church pillaged by a rampaging gang of Puritan iconoclasts; in the same year he was appointed Bishop of Chichester only to be ejected from his see in 1643 (he was restored to in in 1660). As his somewhat florid 'Elegy upon the most Incomparable King Charles the First' of 1649 demonstrates, the nature of his political and religious loyalties was never in doubt. The 'Elegy' unequivovally sees Charles as a martyr enthroned in heaven while below him his former subjects are sundered from each other by 'that Bloody Cloud, / whose purple  Mists Thy Murther'd Body Shroud'. Vengeance, King solemnly reminds his readers, is a prime prerogative of God, a factor which 'bids us our Sorrow by our Hope confine,/ And reconcile our Reason to our Faith'. Much of King's verse is, however, secular in subject and unspecifically Christian in its imagery, though even his amorous poetry is haunted by a vague melancholy and an awareness of transience. Both the 'Midnight Meditation' and the much imitated stanza 'Sic Vita' (generally ascribed to him) stress the frailty of human life and human aspiration. Amongst his many elegies the tribute to his dead wife, 'The Exequy. To his Matchlesse never to be forgotten Freind', quite transcends the rest of his poetry in quality and poignancy. Although the poem scarcely sets out to forbid mourning, its interplay of images of books and libraries, of suns, stars, and seasons, and finally of battle ('My pulse like a soft Drum / Beats my approach, tells Thee I come') suggests something of King's debt to the 'valedictions' of John Donne.








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Garcialandia

 

martes, 30 de septiembre de 2014

Garcialandia

Este periódico sobre mi propia temática se publica en Paper.li, un sitio de Amazon según creo. En esta versión limitada es gratuito... y automático también. Más vale, que si no, me faltarían manos para actualizarlo. Esto de aquí es sólo el widget; pinchen el título para llegar a la sustancia de la cosa.


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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:25. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Internet


211 en Alianzo

martes, 7 de octubre de 2014

211 en Alianzo

211 en Alianzo


Viene a ser que estoy en el 0,75 % de los primeros puestos. No mal.

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:51. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Blogs


Kate Bush at the BBC

martes, 7 de octubre de 2014

Kate Bush at the BBC

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:53. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música


Vista de Sálvora

martes, 7 de octubre de 2014

Vista de Sálvora

Vista de Sálvora

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:54. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


See Me at the Psychology Wiki

miércoles, 8 de octubre de 2014

See Me at the Psychology Wiki

No hay muchos enlaces de filólogos españoles, ni extranjeros, en este artículo introductorio o visión general del área de la filología—pero allí estoy yo. También en "Lingüística", por cierto.

http://psychology.wikia.com/wiki/Philology

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:57. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Me enlazan


More on the same

miércoles, 8 de octubre de 2014

More on the Same

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Lunes, 16 de Noviembre de 2015 17:59. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Me enlazan


Homenajes a Canellas, a Ynduráin, a Frutos y a Beltrán

miércoles, 8 de octubre de 2014

Homenajes a Canellas, a Ynduráin, a Frutos y a Beltrán

Indices de algunos de los volúmenes de homenaje que publicó la Facultad de Filosofía y Letras de la Universidad de Zaragoza en la generación que me precedió allí—dedicados a los doctores Ángel Canellas, Francisco Ynduráin, Eugenio Frutos y Antonio Beltrán. Aún no ha dedicado la Facultad ningún homenaje a catedráticos de nuestro departamento—aunque yo mismo edité en tiempos un volumen de la Miscelánea en homenaje a Carmen Olivares.

Homenaje a Ángel Canellas:

Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Foreword by A. Beltrán. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969.*
Abbad, Francisco. "Alenza y Goya." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 7-11.* (Leonardo Alenza)
Aguelo Palacios, Pascual, and Manuel Antonio Martín Bueno. "Sobre algunos vasos cerámicos procedentes de Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 13-18.*
Andréu Ocáriz, Juan José. "La esclavitud negra en América." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 19-39.*
Ansón, María del Carmen. "Entrada de un virrey de Aragón en Zaragoza [1601]." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 41-50.*
Armillas, José Antonio. "Viar y Jáudenes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 51-76.* (Diplomats in USA, 1789-96).
Aubá Estremera, Natividad. "Epístola de las miujeres de Tamarite de Litera." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 77-82.* (Under Philip IV).
Barandiarán, Ignacio. "Vaso campaniforme en la cueva de los Casares." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 83-88.*
Beltrán Lloris, Miguel. "Notas sobre materiales arqueológicos en Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 89-95.*
Beltrán Martínez, Antonio. "Las figuras naturalistas del prado del Azobue, en Aldeaquemada." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 97-99.*
Bielza de Ory, Vicente. "El modelado kárstico de la sierra de Urbasa." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 101-19, plus map.* (Navarre).
Blasco, María Concepción. "Las fusaiolas del del yacimiento ibérico de Botorrita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 121-24.*
Blecua, José Manuel. "Versos nuevos de Fernández de Heredia." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 125-47.* (Juan Fernández de Heredia, 16th c. poet).
Bobes, María del Carmen. "Los cambios semánticos." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 149-76.*
Borobio Enciso, María Pilar. "Estudio sobre la demografía de Cuenca: 1960-65." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 177-83.*
Borrás Gualis, Gonzalo Máximo. "Pintores aragoneses del siglo XV." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 185-99.*
Bosch Vilá, Jacinto. "Una adición a la genalogía de la familia beréber de los Banu Razin." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 201-8. (Albarracín).*
Bosque Maurel, Joaquín. "Minería y agricultural tradicional en el Marquesado del Zenete." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 209-26. (Granada).*
Cañada Sauras, Javier A. "La iglesia parroquial de Cretas." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 227-36.* (Cretas, Teruel).
Carnicer, Ramón. "La Frenología en Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 237-48.*
Carreras, Juan José. "Una biografía de Marx." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 249-58.*
Corona, Carlos E. "El poder real y los motines de 1766." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 259-77.*
Falcón Pérez, María Isabel. "Ordenanzas municipales de Laguna de Cameros." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 279-303.*
Fatás Cabeza, Guillermo. "Monedas griegas en el Museo Provincial de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 305-9.*
Fernández Cuervo, Carmen. "Las joyas de adorno personal en inventarios zaragozanos del siglo XVI." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 311-27.*
Fernández Serrano, Francisco. "Un poeta exspañol del siglo XVI: Hernando Afrodiseo de Aragón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 329-34.*
Fernández Teno, Nazareth. "Algunas noticias de un inventario real." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 335-53.*  (Juan II, c. 1470).
Ferrer Benimeli, José Antonio. "El Conde de Aranda, primer Secretario de Estado." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 355-78.*
Ferrer Regales, Manuel and Elena Uriz Echalecu. "Una experiencia de metodología activa en la enseñanza universitaria." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 379-90.*
Floriano, Antonio C. "Tres documentos del infante don Alfonso, titulado Alfonso XII (1465-1468)." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 391-410.*
Floristán, Alfredo. "La población de Navarra en el quinquenio 1960-1965." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 411-20.
Fribourg, Jeanine. "Sur l'application des méthodes ethnologiques dans l'étude des sociétés modernes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 421-33.*
Frutos Cortés, Eugenio. "Estructura unitaria de la 'naturaleza humana'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 435-42.*
Frutos Mejías, Luisa María. "Los cultivos forrajeros en el Ebro medio." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 443-57 plus map.*
Galindo Romeo, Pascual. "Inventarios y libros (1340-1540). Síntesis bibliográfica." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 459-502.*
García Manrique, E. "Sobre el turismo español." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 503-30.*
Gay Gacén, Jerónimo. "Los depósitos cuaternarios en la confluencia del Esera-Isábena." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 531-40, plus map.*
Gil, Ildefonso Manuel. "Luis López Allué, escritor aragonés." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 541-52.*
Gómez de Valenzuela, Manuel. "Tres ermitas románicas pirenaicas." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 553-62.*
González Antón, Luis. "Aportación al estudio de la minoría de Alfonso XI de Castilla." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 563-84.*
Higueras Arnal, Antonio. "La agricultura de regadío en España." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 585-630.*
Jiménez Jiménez, María Rosa. "Sobre el gremio de curtidores en Barcelona." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 631-40.*
Lacarra, José María. "En torno a los orígenes del reino de Pamplona." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 641-70.*
Ledesma Rubio, María Luisa. "La Hacienda Municipal de Zaragoza en el año 1442." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 671-87.*
López González, Juan-Jaime. "Regocijos públicos en la Zaragoza de 1782 a 1792." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 689-93.*
MaDermott, Dorieann. "Smelfungus and Yorick." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 707-19.*
Martín Duque, Angel J. "Concesión de la feria de Graus por Pedro II de Aragón (1201)." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 721-24.*
Martínez Cordón, Ana María. "Los sondeos petrolíferos en España." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 725-38.*
Mateu Ibars, María Dolores. "El 'Repertori' de San Vicente de la Roqueta, de 1763." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 739-44.*
Mateu y Llopis, Felipe. "Sello y documentos del arcipreste de Morella Domingo Bell Tall, de 1335." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 745-50.*
Mensua, Salvador. "El modelado de La Muela de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 751-62.*
Miralbés Bedera, María Rosario, and María Pilar de Torres Luna. "Sobre la función comercial de Santiago y su área de influencia." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 763-71, plus map and photographs.* (Santiago de Compostela).
Monge, Felix. "Sobre la 'lengua aragonesa'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 771-83.*
Moreno del Rincón, Encarnación B. "Iglesia parroquial de San Miguel, Ibdes." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 785-93.*
Moya Valgañón, José Gabriel. "Sobre Bernal de Forment y Natuera Borgoñón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 795-804, plus illustrations.* (Artists, 16th c.).
Olaechea, Rafael. "La relación 'amistosa' entre F. A. de Lorenzana y J. N. de Azara." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 805-50.*
Oliván Baile, Franisco. "Una crónica desconocida de Fernando de Antequera." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 851-74.* (Fernando I, Crowned in Zaragoza, 1414).
Olivares, Carmen. "El lenguaje hipnótico de la 'gran sociedad'." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 875-85.*
Pedraza Prades, María Dolores. "Un sermón especial en un auto de fe zaragozano." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 887-91.* (1486).
Requejo Díaz de Espada, Elena. "Un retablo de la Seo de Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 893-902.*
Sánchez Sanz, María del Pilar. "Un retablo de la iglesia de Luceni." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 903-7.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "Sobre algunos calígrafos del Bajo Renacimiento en Zaragoza." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 909-51, plus illustrations.*
Soláns Castro, Manuela. "Notas sobre desarrollo urbano de Monzón." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 953-62.*
Tolosa, María Teresa. "El obispado de Nueva Orleáns y su clero." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 963-70.*
Torralba Soriano, Federico. "Tres versiones de una iconografía." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 971-73, plus illustrations.* (Christ tied to the column).
Ubieto Arteta, Antonio. "La 'Tercera Crónica General' y Zurita." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 975-77.*
Valenzuela Fuertes, María del Carmen. "La explotación del territorio ansotano en el pasado." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 979-95, plus map.*
Ynduráin, Francisco. "Sobre la función fática del lenguaje." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 997-1001.*
Yrache Esteban, Luis. "Sobre Cien años de soledad y el lenguaje novelesco." In Suma de Estudios en homenaje al Ilustrísimo Doctor Ángel Canellas López. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1969. 1003-8.*
Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain
Aguirre, José María. "El mundo 'tetradimensional absurdo' de Miguel Labordeta." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 9-22.*
Alvar, Manuel, and Fernando de la Granja. "Apostillas lingüísticas al 'Fecho de Buluqiya'." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 23-40.*
Beltrán, Antonio. "Notas sobre literatura popular en Aragón." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 41-46.*
Blecua, José Manuel. "Las Rimas de don Tomás Sivori, caballero genovés." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 47-64.*
Buesa Oliver, Tomás. "Léxico vasco relativo al tiempo en la Navarra Nordoriental (Partido de Aóiz)." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 65-106.*
Canellas López, Ángel. "Un documento soriano romanceado: Infeudación del castillo de Alcozar hacia 1156." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 107-29.*
Frutos, Eugenio. "Pensamiento, expresión y comunicación." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 129-36.*
Gil, Ildefonso-Manuel. "Estructuras concéntricas en las Rimas de Gustavo Adolfo Bécquer." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 137-46.*
Giménez Resano, Gaudioso. "Lenguaje y lenguaje poético (a propósito de la oda tercera 'A Felipe Ruiz' de Fray Luis de León." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 147-62.*
Guardiola, Conrado. "El Abencerraje y la Hermosa Jarifa: Estudio de su estructura." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 163-74.*
Lacarra, José María. "Un nuevo texto foral navarro-aragonés." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 175-200.*
Lázaro Carreter, Fernando. "Función poética y verso libre." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 201-16.*
Mainer, José-Carlos. "Aliadofilia y juegos florales." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 217-28.*
Monge, Félix. "Sufijos españoles para la designación de 'golpe'." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 229-48.*
Pérez Gállego, Cándido. "El arranque de A Farewell to Arms de Hemingway." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 249-48.*
Pinillos, José Luis. "Tipos de personalidad y estilos connotativos." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 259-66.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "El teatro en Zaragoza en tiempos de Lope de Vega." In Homenaje a Francisco Yndurain. Foreword by Antonio Beltrán. Zaragoza: Universidad de Zaragoza, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, 1972. 267-361.*




 Homenaje a Eugenio Frutos:

Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977.
Beltrán, Antonio. "Eugenio Frutos Cortés." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 7-10.*
"Publicaciones de Eugenio Frutos Cortés." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 11-20.*
Alvar, Manuel. "Un rasgo aragonés: la agudeza de conceptos." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 21-29.*
Bielza de Ory, Vicente. "La ampliación conceptual y metodológica de la geografía económica en las últimas décadas." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 31-49.*
Buesa Oliver, Tomás. "Aspectos de la Universidad de Zaragoza durante la primera guerra carlista." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 51-79.*
Canellas López, Ángel. "La capilla de la Anunciación de la parroquial de Longares, fundación del arzobispo Don Diego de Escolano." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 81-92.*
Corona, Carlos E. "Los sucesos en Badajoz, el 7 de abril, y en Baza, el 25 de mayo de 1766." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 93-104.*
Díaz-Regañón López, José Mª. "Apostillas a los apéndices VIII, XII y XIII de la edición de Apolodoro de Frazer en la 'Loeb Classical Library'." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 105-17.* (J. G. Frazer).
Ferrer Benimeli, José A. "La masonería bonapartista en Cataluña: La Logia 'Napoléon le Grand' de Gerona (1811-1813) y la de 'Les Amis de la Réunion' de Figureras (1812-1813)." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 119-44.*
Frutos Mejías, eugenio. "Notas sobre la teoría de los elementos en el Timeo de Platón." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 145-63.*
Lacarra Ducay, Mª Carmen. "Cuatro fragmentos del retablo de Blesa no conocidos." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 165-76.*
Láscaris Comneno, Constantino. "Los perros filósofos y los filósofos mordedores." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 177-85.* (Plato).
Lázaro Carreter, Fernando. "Eugenio Frutos, nuestro maestro." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 187-93.*
Ménsua, Salvador, and Manuela Soláns. "Posibilidades metodológicas de la representación cartográfica de los espacios cultivados: El modelo de Zaragoza." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 195-202 plus map.*
Monge, Félix. "Fondo y forma en Valle-Inclán." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 203-12.*
Olaechea, R. "Contribución al estudio  del 'Motín contra Esquilache' (1766)." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 213-347.*
Pérez Gállego, Cándido. "La destrucción del símbolo." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 349-66.*
San Vicente, Ángel. "Acotaciones documentadas para la historia del arte en cinco villas durante el siglo XVI." In Estudios en homenaje al Dr. Eugenio Frutos Cortés. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1977. 367-445.*




Homenaje a Antonio Beltrán

Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Foreword by Vicente Camarena García. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986.*  
Camarena Badía, Vicente. "Antonio Beltrán Martínez." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 7-10.* 
"Bibliografía del Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 11-27.* 
Pellicer Corellano, F., J. L. Peña Monne and M. J. Ibáñez Marcellán. "Estudio geomorfológico del yacimiento de Burrén y Burrena (Depresión del Ebro): Génesis del relieve y evolución holocena." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 33-45.* 
Bielza de Ory, V., and S. Escolano Utrilla. "La estructura y localización de los asentamientos en España." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 47-59.* 
Clottes, Jean, Jean-Pierre Giraud, and Christian Servelle. "Un galet gravé badegoulien à Vers (Lot)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 61-84.* 
Barrière, Cl. "Figures animales transformées dans la grotte de Combarelles." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 85-91.* 
Roussot, Alain. "La figuration humaine de Bernifal (Dordogne)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 93-101.* 
Moure-Romanillo, Alfonso, and Manuel González-Morales. "Los grabados de los abrigos de El Perro y San Carlos (Santoña, Cantabria)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 103-14.* 
Baldellou, V., A. Painaud, and Mª J. Calvo. "Dos nuevos covachos con pinturas naturalistas en el Vero (Huesca)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 115-33.* 
Casado López, María Pilar. "Dispersión de la pintura y grabado rupestre en América." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 135-48.* 
Vallespí Pérez, Enrique. "Culturas de las graveras y comienzos del achelense ibérico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 149-57.* 
Montes Ramírez, Mª Lourdes, and Carlos Mazo Pérez. "El musteriense y el método Bordes: Algunas reflexiones." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 159-70.* 
Galindo Ortiz de Landazuri. "Los conjuntos líticos de Montón y Miedes (Zaragoza): Nuevas aportaciones al conocimiento del Paleolítico de la Cuenca del Jalón." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 171-90.* 
Hernández Paricio, Francisco. "Sobre el lenguaje en el hombre de Neanderthal." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 191-203.* 
Utrilla Miranda, Pilar. "La varilla 'pseudoexcisa' de Aitbitarte IV y sus paralelos franceses." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 205-25.* 
Delibes de Castro, Germán, Montserrat Alonso Díez, and Rafael Galván Morales. "El miradero: Un enterramiento colectivo tardoneolítico de Villanueva de los Caballesos (Valladolid)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 227-36.* 
Andrés Rupérez, Teresa. "Sobre cronología dolménica: País Vasco, Navarra y Rioja." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 237-65.* 
Pérez Arrondo, Carlos L. "Algunos datos para el estudio de la Edad de los Metales en el Valle del Ebro Medio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 267-83.* 
Picazo Millán, Jesús V. "Aproximación al conocimiento de los yacimientos líticos del Jiloca Medio - Campo Romanos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 285-328.* 
Pellicer Catalán, Manuel. "Luis Siret, promotor de la arqueología hispana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 329-38.* 
Gil-Mascarrel Bosca, Milagro, and Alonso Rodríguez Díaz. "Un enterramiento en Cista en Villafranca de los Barros (Badajoz)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 339-46.* 
Jimeno Martínez, Alfredo. "La cueva de 'El Peñal' de Valdegeña (Soria): Nuevas bases para su estudio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 347-57.* 
Blasco Bosqued, Mª Concepción. "Panorama general del Bronce Final y Primera Edad del Hierro en el área nororiental de la submeseta sur." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 359-72.* 
Rodanés, J. Mª, and J. L. Royo. "Representaciones zoomorfas en la cerámica del Bronce final y primera Edad del Hierro en el valle medio del Ebro." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 373-87.* 
Eiroa, Jorge Juan. "Una aproximación al modelo urbano del Bajo Aragón protohistórico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 389-408.* 
Atrián Jordán, Purificación. "El Cabezo de la Cisterna de Alba (Teruel). Un yacimiento de la primera edad del hierro." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 409-28.* 
Delporte, H. "Le Musée des Antiquités Nationales de Sant-Germain-en-Laye." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 429-38.* 
Anati, Emmanuel. "Har Karkom: E  problemi cronologici ed esegetici." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 439-51.* 
Hernández Vera, José Antonio, and Juan José Murillo Ramos. "La metalurgia celtibérica: Proyecto de investigación." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 453-61.* 
Fernández Miranda, Manuel. "La estela de las herencias (Toledo)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 463-76.* 
Almagro-Gorbea, Martín. "Aportación inicial a la paleodemografía ibérica." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 477-93.* 
Beltrán Lloris. "Introducción a las bases arqueológicas del valle medio del río Ebro en relación con la etapa prerromana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 495-527.* 
Burillo Mozota, Francisco. "Sobre el territorio de los lusones, belos y tirios en el siglo II a.de C." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 529-49.* 
Domínguez Arranz, Mª Almudena. "Un estudio sobre la iberización de la provincia de Huesca." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 551-66.* 
Cuadrado, Emeterio. "El problema de los restos escultóricos de las necrópolis ibéricas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 567-87.* 
Tovío Sarnago, Soledad. "Motivos zoomorfos en la cerámica ibérica de la provincia de Teruel." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 589-99.* 
Medrano Marqués, Manuel María, and Mª Antonia Díaz Sanz. "Inscripción ibérica sobre vasija tipo 'ilduradin' hallada en Contrebia Belaisca (Botorrita, Zaragoza)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 601-11.* 
Cisneros Cunchillos, Miguel. "Canteras y materiales de construcción de Los Bañales (Uncastillo, Zaragoza)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 613-19.* 
Magallón Botaya, Mª de los Ángeles. "Cronología de la red viaria del Convento Caesaraugustano según los miliarios." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 621-31.* 
Martín Bueno, Manuel. "Gerasa (Jordania): Nuevas perspectivas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 633-47.* 
Balil, Alberto. "Las representaciones de camélidos en la industria artística romana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 649-55.* 
Blázquez, J. M., and M. P. García-Gelabert. "Castulo (Jaén): Ensayo de análisis ambiental." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 657-65.* 
Schrader, Carlos ."La investigación histórica en Herodoto." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 667-76.* 
Fatás, Guillermo. "Para un Índice Toponímico Hispánico (ITH): Índices de Avieno, Estrabón (III), Plinio (III-IV), Ptolomeo y los textos literarios." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 677-730.* 
Marco Simón, F. "El dios céltico Lug y el santuario de Peñalba de Villastar." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 731-59.* 
Roldán Hervás, José Manuel. "Los reclutamientos romanos en el valle del Ebor, en época republicana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 761-69.* 
Cabanes Pecourt, Mª Desamparados. "Escritura romana en Valencia." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 781-88.* 
Sancho Rocher, Laura. "La Lex Publilia del año 471 a.C., las tribus rústicas y la constitución de Servio Tulio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 789-98.* 
Martínez López, Julia. "'Sponsio' y 'Nexum': Dos instituciones clave en los problemas crediticios de los primeros siglos republicanos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 799-808.* 
Pina Polo, Francisco. "El modelo agrícola catoniano." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 809-17.* 
Villacampa Rubio, Mª Angustias. "Consideraciones sobre la Vita Alex. Sev. 21, 3-5: La supuesta reforma del status de los prefectos del pretorio y la conocida tendencia prosenatorial de la Historia Augusta." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 819-32.* 
Escribano Paño, María Victoria. "En torno a una ley de Graciano contra la herejía (Cth. XVI, 5, 4)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 833-49.* 
Amaré Tafalla, Mª Teresa. "Numismática y cerámica romanas: Relaciones iconográficas." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 851-58.* 
Villaronga, L. "Denarioa forrado híbrido, testimonio para el origen del denario ibérico de Sesars." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 859-61.* 
Chaves Tristán, Francisca. "Hallazgo de monedas en Riotinto (Huelva)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 863-72.* 
Lomba Fuentes, Joaquín. "Physis y mímesis en la filosofía del arte griego." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 873-87.* 
Beltrán Lloris, Francisco. "Sobre la función de la moneda ibérica e hispano-romana." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 889-914.* 
Tarradell, M. "Las cecas ibéricas, ¿economía o política?" In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 915-17.*  (Coins).
Iso, José Javier. "Más sobre Aristóteles, Poética (Caps. 9 y 13)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 919-26.* 
Yagüe Ferrer, Mª Isabel. "El retrato femenino en Salustio." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 927-35.* 
Rodón, E. "El diálogo de Medea y Jasón en la tragedia de Séneca." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 937-49.* 
Domínguez, Antonio. "El Roman de Renard y la cuentística española." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 953-67.* 
Mateu y Llopis, Felipe. "Documentos monetarios de Jaime I del Ms. Real 9, del Archivo de la Corona de Aragón. De la moneda de los reals de Valencia y las tabule campsorum de 1247." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 969-81.* 
Mezquíriz Irujo, Mª Ángeles. "Diversas formas cerámicas del siglo XV procedentes de 'El desolado de Rada' (Navarra)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 983-89.* 
Falcón Pérez, María Isabel. "Notas en torno a la cofradía de cuchilleros de Zaragoza. Las ordenanzas de 1413." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 991-97.* 
Ledesma, Mª Luisa. "Acerca de las ordalías y del duelo judicial 'de escudo y bastón' en el aragón medieval." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 999-1006.* 
Borrás Gualis, Gonzalo M. "El palacio mudéjar de los arzobispos de Zaragoza." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1007-14.* 
Ubieto Arteta, Antonio. "Las varraquas de los jaqueses y les barraques dels reals." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1015-18.* 
Sarasa Sánchez, Esteban. "La arqueología industrial por un nuevo conocimeinto histórico." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1019-23.* 
Sesma Muñoz, J. Angel. "La moneda jaquesa y la emisión de Aragoneses de plata." Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1029-39.* 
Monterde Albiac, Cristina, and Mª Rosa Gutiérrez Iglesias. "La hacienda municipal zaragozana en el año 1516." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1041-59.* 
Onega, Susana. "España vista por un viajero inglés a mediados del siglo XVI." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1061-72.*  (Andrew Boorde).
Solano Camón, Enrique. "Xenofobia antifrancesa en Aragón: Discrepancia política y confluencia de intereses en el año 1639." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1073-83.* 
Redondo Veintemillas, Guillermo. "La moneda 'perulera' en Aragón (1650-1653): Notas y documentos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1085-1116.* 
Orol Pernas, Antonio. "La Real Casa de Moneda de Trujillo." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1117-32.* 
Mainer, José-Carlos. "Antropología cultural y mala literatura: El entretenido (1673) de Antonio Sánchez Tórtoes." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1133-52.* 
Armillas, José A., and M. Isabel Molinos. "Sátira política en Zaragoza durante la Guerra de Sucesión (1707)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1153-67.* 
Gonzalvo Vallespí, José Carlos. "Actos de posesión y ceremonial de recibimiento en el ducado de Híjar y condado de Belchite a fines del Antiguo Régimen." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1169-76.* 
Pueyo Colomina, Pilar. "Suscripciones y signos notariales en la parroquia de Castejón de Valdejasa (Siglos XVI-XIX)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1177-91.* 
Cacho, Maite. "Un dance aragonés de 1723." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1193-1201.* 
Albiac Blanco, Mª Dolores. "Vida e ilustración: Dos documentos desconocidos de Antonio Arteta (1745-Ca 1813)." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1203-16.* 
Solano Costa, Fernando. "El ejército de la monarquía durante los tiempos modernos." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1217-30.* 
Val Álvaro, José Francisco. "Sobre lengua e historia en el Catálogo de las Lenguas de Lorenzo Hervás." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1231-39.* 
Enguita Utrilla, José María. "Algunas consideraciones fonéticas sobre las coplas de la jota aragonesa." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1241-58.* 
Martín Zorraquino, Mª Antonia. "Sobre algunas expresiones fijas con nombres de animal en el español coloquial moderno." In Estudios en Homenaje al Dr. Antonio Beltrán Martínez. Zaragoza: Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Universidad de Zaragoza, 1986. 1259-63.* 

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Manchester et Liverpool (2)

sábado, 11 de octubre de 2014

Manchester et Liverpool (2)

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Martes, 17 de Noviembre de 2015 08:23. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música francesa


Rocas debajo de casa

sábado, 11 de octubre de 2014

Rocas debajo de casa

Rocas debajo de casa

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Martes, 17 de Noviembre de 2015 08:25. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes




Zazie - Rue de la Paix

sábado, 11 de octubre de 2014

Zazie - Rue de La Paix

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Martes, 17 de Noviembre de 2015 08:28. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música francesa


Notas sobre VERDAD Y MÉTODO

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

Notas sobre VERDAD Y MÉTODO

Mis notas sobre Verdad y Método: Fundamentos de una hermenéutica filosófica, de Hans-Georg Gadamer, tomadas varios años antes de éste que cumpliese los cien años. Re-scribdizadas ahora.


Notas sobre verdad y método de gadamer.pdf by José Angel García Landa- uploaded by CSGSQ

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Martes, 17 de Noviembre de 2015 08:34. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Les Innocents - L'Autre Finistère

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

Les Innocents - L'Autre Finistère

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 08:44. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música


Bañadoras

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

Bañadoras

Bañadoras

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 08:45. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


L'instant d'amour

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

L'instant d'amour (3)

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 08:46. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías




CFP Memory and Theatre

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

CFP: Memory and Theatre



CALL FOR PAPERS (via PsyArt)



Call for Papers 
Memory and Theatre: performing the Archive
An International Conference 
TANGIER/TETOUAN, MOROCCO 2, 3, 4, 5 MAY 2015 
            Current performance practice and research are caught in an ambiguous compromise comparable to what Jacques Derrida has evocatively termed ‘archive fever’. Archival revivals — from the digitization of performance, to re-enactments of past traumas and art works, to the staging of interventions into existing archives — place the discourses of preservation and intervention in creative tension, inscribing an anxiety towards ephemerality while simultaneously critiquing conservation. Theatre’s liveness and transience are often accompanied by the urgent need for documentation before they enter the mnemonic field of embodied memory. Still, archived documentations of live performance shall never capture the traces of lived yet ephemeral experience.
            The questions which arise in the context of our reflections bring to our attention the complexities between two different logics: performance and archive, disappearance and documentation. The archive logic explored by Derrida’s Archive Fever invokes a dialectical oscillation between commencement and commandment; it combines the practice of storing and restoring. Unlike museums’ tasks of “archiving, categorizing and indexing”, performance “challenges categorization, which was originally its point […] It’s not always an easy fit, but maybe what’s interesting is the way in which the past is reframed in the present.”[1] Following the thread of thought of Rebecca Schneider, reenactments challenge the existing archives and their logic in organizing and reflecting memory and history.
            The term ‘reenactment’ is charged with repetition and repercussion. It is the “practice of replaying or re-doing a precedent event, artwork, or art […] a critical mode of remaining, as well as a mode of remaining critical.” (Schneider, 2-7) It is both an act of documentation as well as a challenge to disappearance. The cultural urge to document the ‘Arab Spring’ — and the ‘years of lead’ — explains a great deal about the desire for reenacting the memory of the past/future. Arabic reenactments of the Arab Spring render the pastness of the past “both palpable and a very present matter.” (Schneider, 30)
            Inspired from our previous discussions we propose a double-edged dialogue, which is artist-driven and research-oriented. The conference also seeks to tease out some of the complexities related to the body as memory. It is a call for more critical attention to archival revivals and re-enactments of memories of the past that have become so visible also in Arabo-Islamic contexts. We invite scholars from around the world to join the debate and offer elements of reflection on the various problematics related to the following proposed panels:
·      Archival revivals between preservation and intervention
·      Sites of memory “a will to remember” (Pierre Nora): the interplay between monumentalization, performance and memory politics.
·      Body as memory and site of agency: staging a body of memories to reveal memories of the body
·      Performing the memory of the past: memory and theatre in the countries of the Arab Spring
·      Performing the archive of the Moroccan ‘years of lead’
Keynote Speakers: (to be announced later) 
Memory and Theatre: presentations by eminent practitioners and scholars// Round tables with guest speakers from the field of performance and academy// Performances// Installations// Workshops (to be announced later)…
The conference is part of the International Festival “Performing Tangier” now in its 11th edition. The theme was carefully chosen as a follow up of our previous international conferences, with the expectation that it would be sharp enough to elicit diverse intellectual contributions from distinguished experts and colleagues from many parts of the world and in many areas of research. Besides academic panel sessions, the conference program will be nourished by a rich artistic public agenda with workshops, exhibitions, book launch, and diverse performances and artistic interventions relevant to ‘Memory and Theatre’, plus receptions and gala dinners to be announced after opening.
Proposals: The organising committee welcomes abstracts and proposals strictly on the above issues. A 250-WORD abstract, along with a ONE PARAGRAPH curriculum vitae, should be submitted electronically (preferably in Word or Rich Text format) by 31 January 2015 to the scientific committee care of Professor Khalid Amine (Conference Convener). Acceptance, however, unfortunately does not include any financial support - participants are responsible for their own funding (i.e. securing grants, etc.) to pay for travel and lodging expenses. Selected conference papers will be published in a special volume upon the approval of the scientific committee. Submitters of accepted proposals will be notified within two weeks of the above deadline and all decisions of the scientific committee are final.
Simultaneous Interpreting in all Panel Sessions
Important dates & Deadlines:
  • Abstract Submission Deadline: 31 January 2015.
  • Notification of Acceptance/Rejection:  15 February, 2015
  • Final Paper Submission Deadline: 01 April, 2015 (included). (The paper must have a sound methodology reflecting the features of real scientific research.  It must be 10 up to 12 pages of A4 format using Times New Romans size 14 in text and size 10 in the margins.
  • The conference will be held on 2, 3, 4 May 2015.
  • Abstracts and completed research papers should be sent to the following emails:
For more information on the conference please contact Prof. Khalid Amine: Khamine55@gmail.com
New Scholars’ Panel: The conference is also a home for graduate students and new scholars from different parts of the world. The establishment of an emerging Scholars’ panel invites new voices to join the debate (provided that their contributions must be relevant to the theme of this year). Up to FIVE participants will be selected for this panel, and each panelist will have ten to fifteen minutes to deliver her/his paper. Graduate students whose papers are accepted will receive free conference registration, free admission to conference luncheon, and a one-year membership in ICPS. Who is eligible? Scholars who meet the definition of ‘new scholars’ are postgraduate students writing up their PhD dissertation or post-doctoral researchers whose PhDs have been completed less than three years.
Registration Fee: 100 Euros payable in advance via Bank transfer (le centre international des études de spectacle, Banque Populaire, Tanger Ain Ktiout: 164 640 2121490077510009 61) or upon arrival. Registration includes 2 Gala Receptions, conference pack, tickets for any public concerts or site-specific performances within the conference’s public agenda, free guided tour of the Kasbah Museum, and one of the books of published proceedings from previous conferences. Since the conference is again pulling a very international public, registered attendees, participants from past conferences, and friends of ICPS will be most welcome to attend too. Women and underrepresented minorities are especially encouraged to apply.  ICPS is an Affirmative Acting/ Equal Opportunity Organization.
Conference Location: Faculty of Letters at Abdelmalek Essaâdi University (Tétouan), the Kasbah Museum (Tangier), Sahat El Kasbah, Chellah Hotel…
The Scientific Advisory Board (2015)
·      Erika Fischer-Lichte (Head of DFG Collaborative Research Centre "Performing Cultures" and Director of BMBF International Research Centre "Interweaving Cultures in Performance", Berlin, Germany
·      Christel Weiler, Professor at Institute for theatre science of the Freie Universität Berlin, Germany 
·      Maria Shevtsova (Chair Professor of Drama and Theatre Arts, Co-editor of New Theatre Quarterly (Cambridge University Press), Director of Sociology of Theatre and Performance Research Group, University of London) 
·      Marvin Carlson (The Sidney E. Cohn Professor of Theatre, Comparative Literature and Middle Eastern Studies at the Graduate Center of the City University of New York)
·      George F. Roberson, Adjunct Assistant Professor, Geography Human Dimensions Research Cluster, University of Massachusetts-Amherst, USA
·      Richard Gough, Senior Research Fellow and Artistic Director of the Centre for Performance Research, Department of Theatre, Film and Television Studies, Aberystwyth University, Aberystwyth, Wales
·      Zohra Makach (Professor of Theatre at Ibn Zohr University of Agadir. She holds a PhD degree in Theatre Studies from Paris III)
·      Omar Fertat (Professor of Theater in the Arab World, Department of Oriental Studies and the Far East and the Department of Performing Arts, Université Michel de Montaigne, Bordeaux 3)
·      Mohammed Samir Al-Khatib  (Professor, Ain Shams University, Egypt)
Conference Supporting Committee:
·    Mohammed Saad Zemmouri (Dean of the Faculty of Humanities at AEU)
·      Mohammed Kaouti (Independent Playwright, Morocco)
·      Carol Malt (Museum Curator, Adjunct Professor at the University of West Florida, and Ex-Director of the Art & Culture Center of Hollywood, USA)
·      Marjorie Kanter  (Author of short literary and poem-like pieces, USA)
·      Said Karimi (Professor, Faculty of Errachidiya, Moulay Ismail University)
·      Noureddine Chemlali (Director, King Fahd School of Translation)
·      Mustapha El-Ghachi (Vice Dean, Faculty of Humanites, AEU, Tetouan)
·      Abderrazzak Essrhir (Chair of the English Department at AEU)
·      Mohamed Bahjaji (Playwright and journalist, Morocco)
·      Abdelmajid El Hawass (Artist, ISADAK, Morocco)
·      Redouan El Ayadi (Professor, Abdelmalek Essaadi University)
·      Mohammed Taqqal (Regional Director of the Miniustry of Culture)
Conference Convener:
Khalid Amine (President of ICPS)
Conference Co-Convener:
Younes El-Assad Ryani (Professor of Cultural Studies, Abdelmalek Essaadi University)
Conference Assistants:
Jaouad Radouani (Theatre Scholar, member of ICPS)
Badreddine Charab (Administrator, ICPS)    charab09@yahoo.fr
Abdelaziz Khalili (General Secretary, ICPS)    khaliliaziz@yahoo.fr
Conference Organizing Committee:
(ICPS members & volunteers/ to be announced later)
Contact information:
Khalid Amine, Conference Convener, Residence Al Andalous  N° 11, Rue  Birr Anzaran, Tanger 90 010, Maroc Adresse: E-mail: khamine55@gmail.com, Tél/Fax: (212) 539330466, Portable: 0664596791/ Web: www.furja.ma / Bank details of ICPS, Centre International des Etudes de Spectacles, Banque populaire, Agence N° 36, Tanger Ain Ktiouet, Relevé d’identité bancaire: 164 640 212149007751000961.                                           © ICPS

 


[1] Carol Kino, in Rebecca Schneider, Performing Remains: Art and war in Times of Theatrical Reenactment (New York: Routledge, 2011), p.5.

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 08:49. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Robert Wilson / Rufus Wainwright / Shakespeare's Sonnets

domingo, 12 de octubre de 2014

Robert Wilson / Rufus Wainwright / Shakespeare's Sonnets

Aquí la ópera en que colaboran Robert Wilson y Rufus Wainwright, basada en los sonetos de Shakespeare e interpretada por el Berliner Ensemble.

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 08:50. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Música




Una isla

lunes, 13 de octubre de 2014

Una isla

Una isla

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 15:43. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


El autor implícito y el narrador no fiable

lunes, 13 de octubre de 2014

El autor implícito y el narrador no fiable

nofiable-libre.pdf by JAGL uploaded by martinadan

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Miércoles, 18 de Noviembre de 2015 15:46. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Don't Think Twice, It's All Right

lunes, 13 de octubre de 2014

Hace seis años ya iba yo colgando canciones en YouTube... y hace siete también, sólo que las más viejas las borré por error. ¡Eh, que hay que tener en cuenta que por entonces YouTube apenas existía! Igual ésta la debería haber borrado por error, pero ahí va, o ahí vuelve. Es también de las primeras canciones de Bob Dylan que me gustaron—The Freewheelin' Bob Dylan es el primer disco que me compré, de hecho, allá por mediados de los setenta. Y aquí seguimos, diciendo siempre adiós, aunque sea siempre mucho decir.

 

Don't Think Twice It's All Right





No es de mis canciones más vistas ni más visitás..... y esas tampoco son muy vistas, aunque estén muy vistas.


—oOo—

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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 06:52. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías




Microblog de octubre 2014

lunes, 13 de octubre de 2014

Microblog de octubre 2014

Fotos que se perdieron

 

31 oct 14, 21:11
 JoseAngel: Radio Materialista: la democracia: http://m.ivoox.com/radio-materialista-episodio-20-especial-sobre-la-audios-mp3_rf_3678575_1.html
31 oct 14, 14:12
JoseAngel: Conferencia de Zaragoza Lingüística: Margarita Porroche, "La oralidad en las columnas de opinión" http://youtu.be/kWbDvspfxT8
30 oct 14, 19:44
 JoseAngel: http://youtu.be/oPMv2eOKfkY
30 oct 14, 19:44
 JoseAngel: Sobre la corrupción (minuto 46.46) "la tentación..." —"... vive arriba".
29 oct 14, 19:12
 JoseAngel: Epistolary literature: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00775dh
29 oct 14, 13:17
JoseAngel: Entrevista con Albert Rivera: http://youtu.be/2gMnXb0GQpI
29 oct 14, 10:17
JoseAngel: Me citan en este artículo de Thélème: Revista Complutense de Estudios Franceses: http://dialnet.unirioja.es/servlet/articulo?codigo=3355777&orden=0&info=link
29 oct 14, 09:10
JoseAngel: Somos citados (NARRATOLOGY) en la tesis POSTMODERNIDAD DISCRETA, de la Universidad de Salamanca, sobre Darío Jaramillo: https://es.scribd.com/doc/244778258/DLEH-Adam-Faye-Posmodernidad-discreta-pdf
29 oct 14, 08:43
JoseAngel: La economía que se fue: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/la_economia_que_fue_28_10_14
28 oct 14, 20:51
JoseAngel: Mariano, qué agonía la nuestra: http://tv.libertaddigital.com/videos/2014-10-28/federico-mariano-que-agonia-la-nuestra-con-tu-agonia-6047480.html
28 oct 14, 10:58
JoseAngel: Literary theory: Introduction and Greek origins: https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267417606_Literary_Theory_Introduction_and_Greek_Origins
27 oct 14, 18:03
JoseAngel: Débat sur la célébrité et la visibilité: http://youtu.be/izB2RB29FFc
27 oct 14, 17:40
JoseAngel: Life of John Milton: http://bcw-project.org/biography/john-milton
27 oct 14, 16:53
JoseAngel: Mi definición de narración, traducida al rumano: http://www.e-scoala.ro/ctitc/Narratology_an_Introduction22.html
27 oct 14, 16:39
JoseAngel: La sombra del sexador de nubes: http://lapaseata.wordpress.com/
27 oct 14, 13:48
JoseAngel: Los garabatos neandertales—¿primera escritura? ¿primer arte? ¿primera geometría? http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141027_z0_vangu34.pdf
27 oct 14, 01:23
JoseAngel: Minuto 41: "We're still alive! Still standing!"
27 oct 14, 00:44
JoseAngel: Amy Winehouse live De la Semaine: http://youtu.be/Hlu7jPQSOuE
26 oct 14, 19:16
JoseAngel: 1984. Y era aquí. http://1984puntocat.tumblr.com/
26 oct 14, 17:57
JoseAngel: Pablemos citando a Judith Butler y a Beckett: http://youtu.be/YypsrIKl0zw
26 oct 14, 13:58
JoseAngel: Un capítulo mío sobre la narración en Samuel Beckett, en el Continental Philosophy eJournal: http://www.ssrn.com/link/Continental-Philosophy.html
26 oct 14, 13:45
JoseAngel: The Final Cut: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J7F53O58SBg
26 oct 14, 12:03
JoseAngel: Mas dice que quiere engañar al Estado: pero quien lo dice públicamente no quiere engañar, sino insultar y humillar, y mostrar el justo desprecio.
25 oct 14, 22:38
JoseAngel: Intensa, por cierto, Nuria Espert en 'La violación de Lucrecia' de Shakespeare: http://www.teatrodelasesquinas.com/nuria-espert-la-violacion-de-lucrecia/
25 oct 14, 12:15
JoseAngel: An audio on Marlowe (BBC In Our Time): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9d6
25 oct 14, 10:19
JoseAngel: Me enlazan la bibliografía en el Colegio de Bachilleres de México: http://www.cbachilleres.edu.mx/cb/comunidad/docentes/pdf/Reforma_curricular/Documentos/primersemestre2012/Ap_Artistica.pdf
24 oct 14, 23:05
JoseAngel: Las noticias de hoy con César Vidal: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/las_noticias_del_dia_24_10_14
24 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Narración autodiegética: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2514510
24 oct 14, 19:10
JoseAngel: Cataluña: Un vergonzoso delirio colectivo, liderado por mangantes y cenutrios.
24 oct 14, 16:03
JoseAngel: Un orgasmo filológico: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141024_z0_VA-34.pdf
24 oct 14, 08:36
JoseAngel: 1980: http://www.libertaddigital.com/opinion/cristina-losada/1980-o-como-no-se-ha-contado-antes-el-terror-de-eta-73809/
22 oct 14, 20:05
JoseAngel: The Divine Right of Kings: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b0080xph
22 oct 14, 18:49
JoseAngel: Imelda Marcos as the new Evita: http://youtu.be/KQoDjGGtyyg
22 oct 14, 14:20
JoseAngel: Will Self on ICT and literacy: http://www.theguardian.com/books/2014/oct/03/fate-literary-culture-sealed-internet-will-self
22 oct 14, 13:20
JoseAngel: The new degree reform in THE JOYS OF TEACHING LITERATURE: http://blogs.uab.cat/saramartinalegre/2014/10/19/the-new-ba-grado-reform-no-way-to-educate-anyone/
22 oct 14, 11:41
JoseAngel: Toleration in the 17th c. http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p004y288
22 oct 14, 00:44
JoseAngel: Semiosphere of Narratology: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/102201--1057-1045-1052-1048-1054-1057-1060-1045-1056-1040-1053-1040-1056-1056-1040-1058.php
22 oct 14, 00:38
JoseAngel: Acebes, también imputado: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-21/tertulia-de-dieter-teresa-romero-supera-el-ebola-80045.html
21 oct 14, 16:11
JoseAngel: Melvyn Bragg on Milton: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548bg
21 oct 14, 12:47
JoseAngel: Hale, ya llevo 30 años de profesor universitario, y ni me había fijado... Acabo de solicitar el sexto quinquenio. En trienios aún soy más viejuno. Por suerte sexenios tengo pocos.
20 oct 14, 16:37
JoseAngel: A Short Biographical Dictionary of English Literature: http://en.wikisource.org/wiki/A_Short_Biographical_Dictionary_of_English_Literature
20 oct 14, 08:16
JoseAngel: El narrador autorial y las otras voces narrativas: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2510225
19 oct 14, 22:58
JoseAngel: Harto de ver la bolita de colores rodar, me encargo un disco duro de 1 Tb
19 oct 14, 18:37
JoseAngel: Estos chavales están demasiado maleados y virtualizados. Paseando por Santa Elena: "Esto de las excursiones es un rollo. Pero mira qué gráficos."
17 oct 14, 20:00
JoseAngel: Nos gobiernan necios, delincuentes y traidores. Qué nivel, España. Y aún podemos darnos con una piedra en los dientes, visto el nivel medio del planeta. Y así es la cosa.
17 oct 14, 10:19
JoseAngel: Kyd's 'Soliman and Perseda'—outside 'The Spanish Tragedy': http://www.britishtheatreguide.info/reviews/tragsoliman-rev
16 oct 14, 18:44
JoseAngel: In Search of Shakespeare: http://youtu.be/4h96ThdV_BM?list=PLIqV890M8SLSf1BHM_ObMO4hJtSF7IWp9
16 oct 14, 18:26
JoseAngel: The Partially Examined Life: Locke's Second Treatise on Govrenment: http://youtu.be/FZh3zIyObGw
16 oct 14, 13:43
JoseAngel: Me citan en el artículo "Stanley Fish" de la Wikipedia: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Stanley_Fish#Secondary_criticism_about_Stanley_Fish
16 oct 14, 13:18
JoseAngel: Tengo READING THE MONSTER, 25 años despúes de escribirlo, en el top 1% en Academia: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda?notification_code=8bN3vZuY
16 oct 14, 13:16
JoseAngel: La "narración" de los anillos del árbol: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141016_z0_Hu3.pdf
16 oct 14, 13:15
JoseAngel: UPyD toma una vía sospechosamente inquisitorial. Mal camino por ahí.
16 oct 14, 13:13
JoseAngel: Estamos en manos de ladrones de guante blanco, bien infiltrados entre la población. Los que pillan son sólo los más evidentes.
16 oct 14, 13:12
JoseAngel: ¿Profesor en inglés, nativo o español? http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141016_z0_PE-06.pdf
16 oct 14, 12:53
JoseAngel: La mamarrachada del nacionalismo catalán: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-16/federico-a-las-6-escasa-respuesta-de-rajoy-a-artur-mas-79841.html
15 oct 14, 19:27
JoseAngel: Faustus and the Morality Play Tradition: http://youtu.be/BILq545a2WE
15 oct 14, 13:42
JoseAngel: Gone Girl, de David Fincher, es una adaptación poco lograda del libro de Gillian Flynn. Mucho mejor leer la novela y dejarlo allí.
15 oct 14, 12:58
JoseAngel: Ben Jonson, THE ALCHEMIST: http://youtu.be/6X4Q3Mm7zYk
14 oct 14, 16:42
JoseAngel: Thomas Paine's COMMON SENSE: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Dxdqdax4VbQ
14 oct 14, 14:47
JoseAngel: Multiversos en Madrid: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141014_z0_elp41.pdf
14 oct 14, 14:44
JoseAngel: Modiano, un Nobel entre la memoria y la culpa: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Jonson
14 oct 14, 12:53
JoseAngel: Who Were the Loyalists? http://youtu.be/W5j8TsHAzsA
14 oct 14, 09:08
JoseAngel: Hoy Ben Jonson: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ben_Jonson
14 oct 14, 07:54
JoseAngel: Garcialandia Is Out: https://paper.li/JoseAngelGLanda/1411163489
13 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Trece de octubre de dos mil catorce.
13 oct 14, 20:58
JoseAngel: Hoy vamos de visita al santuario del Ecce Homo de Borja.
13 oct 14, 20:49
JoseAngel: Marvels and Tales: Journal of Fairy Tale Studies: http://digitalcommons.wayne.edu/marvels/
13 oct 14, 13:34
JoseAngel: Ostras qué traducción se han cascao aquí: http://bddoc.csic.es:8080/detalles.html;jsessionid=2E44BF5CBBABA6F74B8FE8ACC27C6B74?id=365245&bd=ISOC&tabla=docu
13 oct 14, 12:17
JoseAngel: Me citan en esta tesis sobre las Amazonas: https://es.scribd.com/doc/135633121/
13 oct 14, 12:14
JoseAngel: Heaven: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p003k9lf
12 oct 14, 22:33
JoseAngel: Sin Complejos: La batalla de los símbolos: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-10-12/sin-complejos-completo-12102014-79704.html
12 oct 14, 15:48
Gameidiot: portal game easy baru
12 oct 14, 09:27
JoseAngel: Mark Solms on Consciousness: http://www.3sat.de/mediathek/index.php?mode=play&obj=45912
12 oct 14, 00:24
JoseAngel: Pescador y pájaro en La Mirada Indiscreta: http://lamiradaindiscretafotoblog.blogspot.com.es/2014/10/pescador-y-pajaro.html
11 oct 14, 22:18
JoseAngel: Que HORROR, la Malú.
11 oct 14, 22:09
JoseAngel: Poco fiesteros, no vamos al concierto de Malú: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KFvKS8mEK2k
11 oct 14, 20:52
JoseAngel: La insurrección de 1934: Cita con la historia (audio): http://www.ivoox.com/cita-historia-la-insurreccion-audios-mp3_rf_3573288_1.html
11 oct 14, 14:33
JoseAngel: Frank Kermode on Shakespeare's language: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00546s8
11 oct 14, 00:26
JoseAngel: Las élites extractivas: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/jeroboam_montoro
10 oct 14, 19:11
JoseAngel: The Scottish Enlightenment: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/p00548ln
10 oct 14, 18:32
JoseAngel: Tengo varios artículos en el 5% de los más leídos en Academia—y uno en el 0,5% mi primero con más de 10.000 visitas: https://unizar.academia.edu/JoséAngelGarcíaLanda/
10 oct 14, 10:08
JoseAngel: Noticias de ayer de César Vidal: http://www.cesarvidal.com/index.php/Podcast/escuchar-podcast/noticias_del_9_de_octubre_de_2014
9 oct 14, 19:06
JoseAngel: Gregroy Cochran on The 10,000 Year Explosion: http://newbooksinhistory.com/2009/03/05/gregory-cochran-the-10000-year-explosion-how-civilization-accelerated-human-evolution/
9 oct 14, 15:23
JoseAngel: El status narrativo en la Trilogía: El status narrativo en la Trilogía: la narración en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925
8 oct 14, 23:48
JoseAngel: My bibliography on ancient history: http://be.convdocs.org/docs/index-13416.html
8 oct 14, 23:15
JoseAngel: Entrando en la Trilogía: El narrador en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925
8 oct 14, 20:46
JoseAngel: сегодня полнолуние, луна такая недосигаемая и такая яркая, словно огонь среди кромешной темноты
8 oct 14, 09:34
JoseAngel: The Metaphysical Poets: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00cbqhq
7 oct 14, 15:53
JoseAngel: The Trial of Charles I: http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/b00kpzd6
7 oct 14, 15:07
JoseAngel: Jose Angel Garcia Landa Author Rank is 2,299 out of 263,755
7 oct 14, 15:07
JoseAngel: Nobel a los descubridores del GPS cerebral: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141007_z0_MUNDO%2044.pdf
7 oct 14, 08:39
JoseAngel: Federico a las 6: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/es-la-manana-de-federico/federico-a-las-6.html
7 oct 14, 08:25
JoseAngel: Posición en Alianzo 211/28307 - 86 : http://www.alianzo.com/profile/vanity-fea
7 oct 14, 07:53
JoseAngel: Nos citan en esta tesis sobre Åsa Larsson: https://es.scribd.com/doc/241770329/Crime-With-Loss-of-Context-How-the-Translation-Changed-the-Implied-Reader-of-Asa-Larsson-s-the-Savage-Altar
6 oct 14, 23:18
JoseAngel: In Our Time (BBC): http://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/articles/2Dw1c7rxs6DmyK0pMRwpMq1/in-our-time-archive
6 oct 14, 12:39
JoseAngel: Mapping the Universe: Quest for Dark Matter (Priya Natarajan): http://youtu.be/1laEP9uQUiM
5 oct 14, 20:57
JoseAngel: Nolwenn Leroy: http://youtu.be/_agnoIXNc3w?list=PLE17E0FBAB296B3DB
5 oct 14, 17:11
JoseAngel: Tengo 1200 seguidores en ACADEMIA: https://unizar.academia.edu/Jos%C3%A9AngelGarc%C3%ADaLanda/Followers
5 oct 14, 10:04
JoseAngel: Me citan en "Verbum et Ecclesia" http://ve.org.za/index.php/VE/article/view/889/1940
4 oct 14, 23:50
JoseAngel: Tendré que escribir sobre "La complejidad del tiempo humano en George Herbert Mead"
4 oct 14, 23:02
JoseAngel: я дочитал Гамлета, это книга одна из тех немногих, которые заинтересовывают меня не смотря на то, что идут по школьной программе
4 oct 14, 11:30
JoseAngel: Que ridículo público tan atroz, lo de Cataluña. Y encima no se dan cuenta...
4 oct 14, 11:29
JoseAngel: демон слэйер, сейчас посмотрим что это
3 oct 14, 18:36
JoseAngel: Introducción a "Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva": http://ssrn.com/abstract=2505110
3 oct 14, 18:07
JoseAngel: Perros con GPS. Bueno, pronto, todos con GPS y geolocalizados 24 h. al día, por nuestro bien. http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141003_z0_He-03s.pdf
3 oct 14, 16:50
JoseAngel: Con/Texts of Persuasion: http://buch-info.org/t/Con-texts_of_persuasion
3 oct 14, 16:50
JoseAngel: Joaquín Casalduero, El teatro de Cervantes: http://www.march.es/conferencias/anteriores/voz.aspx?p1=21256&l=1
3 oct 14, 13:54
JoseAngel: A Lecture on Elizabethan Theatre: http://shakespearean.org.uk/elizthea1.htm
2 oct 14, 18:08
JoseAngel: The Colleen Bawn: http://garciala.blogia.com/2014/100201-the-colleen-bawn.php
2 oct 14, 17:54
JoseAngel: Hoy clase sobre Spenser (no Spencer): http://garciala.blogia.com/2009/010501-entierro-en-westminster.php
2 oct 14, 17:53
JoseAngel: Entierro en Westminster: http://garciala.blogia.com/2009/010501-entierro-en-westminster.php
2 oct 14, 17:42
JoseAngel: En 2012/13 Questia Media ha vendido 778 ejemplares electrónicos de NARRATOLOGY. No está mal, más de 15 años tras su publicación. De eso me tocan unas royalties que dan para un café.
2 oct 14, 12:26
JoseAngel: The Body— a body of papers: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm?form_name=journalBrowse&journal_id=2136279
2 oct 14, 00:08
JoseAngel: Bede: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bede
1 oct 14, 19:17
JoseAngel: Spark Notes introduction to the beginning of the Faerie Queene: http://youtu.be/R2opkd83bxs
1 oct 14, 19:06
JoseAngel: Spenser in Ireland - today: http://youtu.be/rbpzer-OuQo
1 oct 14, 12:47
JoseAngel: A lecture on Chaucer: http://youtu.be/hw3hg8oDkkY
1 oct 14, 12:41
JoseAngel: La óptica de la invisibilidad: http://www.cnet.com/news/invisibility-cloak-uses-lenses-to-bend-light/
1 oct 14, 12:37
JoseAngel: La rehabilitación de Filosofia, never is, always to be: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1409/140930_z0_heraldo7.pdf
1 oct 14, 12:36
JoseAngel: Las novatadas, el imperio de los mediocres, y buena educación para el fascismo: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141001_z0_ABC47bis.pdf
1 oct 14, 12:34
JoseAngel: Falta colocación en Filología Inglesa en Barcelona: http://prensa.unizar.es/noticias/1410/141001_z0_VA-30.pdf
1 oct 14, 08:22
JoseAngel: If You Really Really Love Me, Read My Blog: Blog de notas de septiembre de 2014: http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/z14-9.html
1 oct 14, 08:20
JoseAngel: Rajoy opone los "cambios en la constitución" a las "políticas que afectan a las personas". Eso da la medida de la importancia que le da a la constitución. Una irrelevancia, un tecnicismo.
1 oct 14, 08:18

JoseAngel: En una cosa tiene razón Mariano: El tarado PSOE aún no ha dicho qué quiere cambiar en la Constitución, sólo que quiere cambiarla pero no sabe cómo.

1 oct 14, 00:51

JoseAngel: Cataluña aún sigue ahí al este y no despega: http://esradio.libertaddigital.com/fonoteca/2014-09-30/editorial-de-luis-herrero-clamor-en-cataluna-contra-la-suspension-del-9-n-79268.html


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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 06:56. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Personales


Los caminos de la lengua

martes, 14 de octubre de 2014

Los caminos de la lengua

Los caminos de la lengua, que ahora localizo en Google Books, es un volumen de homenaje a Enrique Alcaraz, publicado en 2010.  Tengo en él un artículo en la página 1053, "Narratología del sujeto y su trayectoria vital." En esta vista previa de Google no aparece, pero aquí está también en ResearchGate.  El poema de Borges del que hablo allí lo cantaba María José Hernández en "Danzón Porteño", así.








—oOo—

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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 06:58. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


El gobierno catalán renuncia al referéndum

martes, 14 de octubre de 2014

El gobierno catalán renuncia al referéndum

—y anuncia un butifarréndum. Aquí la tertulia de Federico.

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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 06:59. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Política


Bajo los muchos puentes

miércoles, 15 de octubre de 2014

Bajo los muchos puentes

Bajo los muchos puentes

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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 07:00. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Entrando en la Trilogía

miércoles, 15 de octubre de 2014

Entrando en la Trilogía

Estoy subiendo a la SSRN, por capítulos, el libro Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva. Es el primero que publiqué, en 1992, basado en la tesis doctoral de 1988. Aquí va de momento el primer tercio, y lo demás irá siguiendo.

Introducción a 'Samuel Beckett y la Narración Reflexiva':  http://ssrn.com/abstract=2505110

Conceptos básicos de narratología: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2422327

El status narrativo en la Trilogía: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2507744

Entrando en la Trilogía: la narración en 'Molloy': http://ssrn.com/abstract=2506925

Movimientos narrativos: http://ssrn.com/abstract=2510225

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Viernes, 20 de Noviembre de 2015 07:01. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


The Notion of Semiosphere

miércoles, 15 de octubre de 2014

The Notion of Semiosphere

 




Otra manera de decirlo, quizá, es que la semiosfera es la realidad en la que vivimos, entendida como realidad virtual—realidad aumentada o semióticamente constituida. Junto con todos los diversos códigos semióticos y estrategias de interpretación que nos permiten navegar por ella.

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Sábado, 21 de Noviembre de 2015 13:55. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Semiótica


Bea-ch

miércoles, 15 de octubre de 2014

Bea-ch

Bea-ch




Estamos aquí, según se mire, a las alturas de finales de julio.

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Sábado, 21 de Noviembre de 2015 13:56. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. sin tema






La narración en el teatro contemporáneo

jueves, 16 de octubre de 2014

La narración en el teatro contemporáneo

Me citan en esta tesis de la Universidad Montfort sobre narración en el teatro contemporáneo:

Swettenham, Neal. The Role and Status of Narrative in Contemporary Theatre. Ph.D. diss., De Montfort U, 2003. En red en
https://www.dora.dmu.ac.uk/bitstream/handle/2086/4317/271923.pdf



—oOo—

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Sábado, 21 de Noviembre de 2015 14:06. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Chicas en el agua

viernes, 17 de octubre de 2014

Chicas en el agua

Chicas en el agua

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Sábado, 21 de Noviembre de 2015 14:08. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Individuo y espacio público

viernes, 17 de octubre de 2014

Individuo y espacio público

Aparece en Alemania, o aquí, este libro del grupo HERAF, un volumen colectivo con un capítulo mío,

"4. El dividuo social: roles, marcos interaccionales y (nuevos) medios." En Individuo y espacio público. Ed. Juan Velázquez.  Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014. 99-116.

http://www.logos-verlag.de/cgi-bin/buch/isbn/3730



Individuo y espacio público

Y ya está en marcha el segundo seminario HERAF, sobre cuerpo, espacio y temporalidad.


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Sábado, 21 de Noviembre de 2015 14:10. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Filosofía


II Seminario HERAF

(Oct. 2014)

 



Ya ha salido el programa del II seminario del Grupo de investigación sobre Hermenéutica y Antropología Fenomenológica (HERAF). Este segundo seminario versa sobre "Corporalidad, Temporalidad y Espacialidad", y yo hablaré sobre la complejidad del tiempo humano en G. H. Mead.

Acaba de publicarse un libro basado en el primer seminario terminado este año, Individuo y espacio público, editado por Juan Velázquez (Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014).

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Martes, 24 de Noviembre de 2015 13:23. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Filosofía




Satan Rewritten as the Good Guy

viernes, 17 de octubre de 2014

Satan rewritten as the Good Guy





There's a complete video course on John Milton at Yale, by John Rogers, at Yale Courses. This is the last video, on Samson Agonistes.



https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PL4DF1CBD715CEC2F8

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Martes, 24 de Noviembre de 2015 13:29. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


THE STORY IN ALL STORIES


Doy por finalizado este sitio web, THE STORY IN ALL STORIES: Cosmology, Evolution, (Big) History and Representation, ante la dificultad creciente de manejo de la plataforma Storify. Continuaré tratando estas cuestiones en las secciones correspondientes de mi blog, en Blogger mientras aguante—que a fin de cuentas viene siendo el sistema de publicación en red más fiable y flexible para propósitos varios. (PS: CONTINÚA EN FACEBOOK, EN NARRATOLOGÍA EVOLUCIONISTA)

Lo mismo voy a hacer con la otra historia que abrí recientemente en Storify, El Gran Teatro del Mundo, dedicada a la teatralidad de la vida y del teatro, y apenas empezada. Pero una cosa es editar varios blogs, que a eso sí que llego—otra es pasarme el día viendo la bolita de colores girar. La vida entera es demasiado corta para eso, así que sintiéndolo mucho dejo el sitio por imposible, y nos veremos aquí con los medios de a bordo. (PS: CONTINÚA EL GRAN TEATRO DEL MUNDO EN FACEBOOK)

Sigo en cambio editando de momento este blog temático que abrí en ScoopIt, Retrospection: esta otra plataforma no me da problemas, pero sin previo pago sólo me deja llevar un blog. Así que seguimos entretanto en Blogger, y que nos dure.





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Martes, 24 de Noviembre de 2015 13:39. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Blogs






Blog de notas de
José Ángel García Landa

(Biescas y Zaragoza)
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