Blogia
Vanity Fea

Filosofía

Montaigne par Jean-Yves Pouilloux / Raphaël Enthoven





Gustavo Bueno y Manuel Fraijó: Filosofía de la Religión y Teología 1

Gustavo Bueno y Manuel Fraijó: Filosofía de la Religión y Teología 1






Husserl, Heidegger & Existentialism

Hubert Dreyfus on Husserl, Heidegger & Existentialism:






What Are Laws of Nature?

What are Laws of Nature?






Antonio Escohotado sobre Los Enemigos del Comercio

Segunda parte de la entrevista.

Lawrence Cahoone on the modern intellectual tradition

 






Rosi Braidotti en el CCCB

domingo, 22 de enero de 2017

Rosi Braidotti en el CCCB






Heidegger's Being & Time

Heidegger's Being & Time






El efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva

El Efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva (The Matthew Effect and Retroactive Quality)


El 'efecto Mateo' descrito por Thomas Merton ha sido recientemente puesto en valor por Nassim Nicholas Taleb en El Cisne Negro. Consiste esencialmente en una ley estadística de acumulación retroalimentativa de resultados como resultado de la atención mutua en la circulación de la información. Extraemos algunas consecuencias narratológicas y hermenéuticas a partir del análisis de Taleb, relacionando el concepto con la formación de cánones y valoraciones en la literatura y en la crítica académica, y con el concepto de la distorsión retrospectiva (o 'hindsight bias'). Los torbellinos de información resultantes del 'efecto Mateo' crean, retroactivamente, los fenómenos que realimentarán estas dinámicas informacionales de atención en un futuro.

El Efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva

 

https://ssrn.com/abstract=2895701

 


English Abstract: The 'Matthew Effect' described by Thomas Merton has been recently revalued by Nassim Nicholas Taleb in The Black Swan. It consists essentially in a statistic principle of accumulation through feedback dynamics, as a result of mutual attention in the circulation of information. Here we extract some narratological and hermeneutic consequences from Taleb's account, relating this concept with canon formation and dynamics of evaluation in literature and in academic criticism, as well as with the the concept of retrospective distortion of hindsight bias. The informational vortices resulting from the Matthew Effect give rise, retroactively, to the phenomena which will feed back on these informational dynamics of attention in the future.


Jose Angel Garcia Landa


Universidad de Zaragoza



Number of Pages in PDF File: 7
Keywords: Statistics, Success, Canon, Attention, Retrospection, Hindsight Bias, Nassim Nicholas Taleb, Matthew Effect, Feedback, Quality, Evaluation

Jan. 10, 2017 (SSRN)

_____. "El efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 9 July 2009.*
         http://vanityfea.blogspot.com/2009/07/el-efecto-mateo-y-la-calidad.html
_____. "El Efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 15 July 2009.*

          http://www.ibercampus.es/articulos.asp?idarticulo=14463


_____. "El Efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva." Academia 25 July 2017.*
         https://www.academia.edu/34032264/
         2017
_____. "El Efecto Mateo y la calidad retroactiva." ResearchGate 26 July 2017.*
         https://www.researchgate.net/publication/318701310
         2017



 
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The Machine Is Everywhere

miércoles, 4 de enero de 2017

The Machine Is Everywhere








Carlos Madrid - Pascal. Entre las matemáticas y la Filosofía Natural I

viernes, 23 de diciembre de 2016

Carlos Madrid - Pascal. Entre las matemáticas y la Filosofía Natural I






The Nature of Causation: Hume's Regularity Theory

lunes, 19 de diciembre de 2016

The Nature of Causation: Hume's Regularity Theory

A series of lectures by Marianne Talbot at Oxford. 1st one, on Hume's theory of causality, here:

 







Retropost (2006): Realities, Representations and Interactions


Realities, representations and interactions

Publicado en Semiótica. com. José Ángel García Landa

... an ongoing thread from the Narrative-L discussion group, which began problematising the nature /culture divide, and the binarism itself. Now Tony Jackson on the notion of the real and its accurate representation:
This idea of accurate representation of the actual (and its other versions, of which there are many) and the idea that products of human perception are untrue to “the real”  intrigues me. This will get all sloppy with disputable terms but still...

It seems to me that the idea of the impossibility of accurately or truly (or whatever) knowing and/or describing and/or representing the actual is a misbegotten idea. To claim that if human beings are limited to perceiving the real by their natural organs (just to stay with nature for the moment), then we cannot truly perceive the real is beset by a serious logical flaw. In order to make such a blanket judgment it seems there would have to be some existing possible precise and true knowledge of the real in relation to which our own perceptions could be evaluated. But (apart from supernatural entities) no such knowledge can exist. In a similar way if knowledge is to be taken in some specifically human sense (probably entailing some ‘meta’ level), then it follows that there must be a difference between the knower and the known. If this is the case, then the notion of a precise or accurate or “true” understanding or representation of the real would again be an impossibility; because how could one know the real absolutely in its essence and remain apart from that essence? The hypothetical maximum requires no difference between knower and known (I think?!) [more than a few ideas of supernatural existence do their best to have the knower and the known both absolute and identical, which is pretty interesting]. What exactly would an accurate representation of the actual be??

So if the hypothetical knowledge in relation to which our own knowledge could possibly be evaluated on some absolute scale is an impossibility, then we have only the actual kinds of knowledge that actually happen on the third planet from the sun. Human knowledge is hardly somehow absolutely valid, is necessarily limited…of course, but once again to say just this as is often said, is what philosophers would call trivial. Knowledge entails limitation. Human knowledge is limited to our representational capacities, but I don’t see how this can be reasonably taken in itself as some kind of deficiency, because we do have the meta-abilities to think about our representations; and otherwise we must be as relatively adequately evolved for the earthly ecosystem as are other successful adaptations.

Hopefully someone will point out the logical flaws in what I’ve said here.

Tony J
 
And here follows my reply, emphasizing the interactional dynamics of representation, it inherent (sometimes implied) dialogical dimension:
Yep, representation never represents the real ding an sich; it always represents my real, the one (in my context, from my viewpoint, with my limitations and my interests and my priorities) I'm promoting. So, barring the omniscient viewpoint or absolute coincidence between representation and object (a desideratum or fantastic by-product of semiotic perspectivism) what remains is the conflict of interpretations, or contest of descriptions if you prefer: Bakthin tells us that any time we bother to open our mouth we are engaging in a dialogue, our discourse a hidden polemic with previous discourses, or descriptions, or representations. So, my reason to open my mouth now after Tony J is both to agree with him and also to polemicise, emphasizing the element of conflict, dialogism and dialogue of perspectives in any act of (or account of) representation.
Peirce, of course, wrote on this subject, as well as Eco (the Dynamic object versus the Immediate Object, meaning vs. the Interpretant, etc.). But both lack, I think, some emphasis on practical interpretive conflicts, and on the reasons why different interpretants, or different representations of an object, are chosen in specific cases: reasons which may be epistemological, ideological, historical, political, scientific, biographical and personal, psychological... 
(As a practical example of conflict, take the flame war that ensued in this list, when I pointed out, using abusive language, that if Sue McPherson's abusive language and insults were to be tolerated in this list, then anything goes. Let me point out that before I chose to use offensive language, list members seemed unwilling to complain about McPherson's poisonous whining and abject self-victimising... perhaps because of her "politically correct" (awfully incorrect to my mind) posing as a radical feminist and a man-hater? There's self-representation for you, and psychopathology—both personal and political). 
Planetas errantes, hechos brutos y realidades virtuales

 

 

Retroposts
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Rick Roderick on Nietzsche on Truth & Lie

jueves, 15 de diciembre de 2016

Rick Roderick on Nietzsche on Truth & Lie [full length]







The Eye in the Sky is the Eye Inside

miércoles, 14 de diciembre de 2016

The Eye in the Sky is the Eye Inside

 plaza george orwell

The eye in the sky, and the judgement in the afterlife, are the ultimate police force. All the more so because they are not just in the sky or in the afterlife, they become interiorized as a part of our personality structure, the super-ego Freud wrote about. It’s such a handy and effective way to manufacture acquiescent and cooperative social subjects that one can only marvel that it needed so many millennia in order to be perfected.


This is by way of commentary to an interview on social and religious evolution by Joseph Henrich ("Conversations with Tyler", audio).

This interiorized god as a personification of social values was theorized (albeit in an implicit way) by George Herbert Mead in his notion of the "generalized other." And, earlier still, by Adam Smith with his notion of the "impartial spectator." More about Smith’s interiorized sociality here (in Spanish).


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A World of Pure Experience - William James' Radical Empiricism

martes, 13 de diciembre de 2016

A World of Pure Experience - William James' Radical Empiricism

 





Nietzsche and the Post-Modern Condition (Rick Roderick)

Nietzsche and the Post-Modern Condition (Rick Roderick)






Nietzsche on Nihilism & the Death of God

Nietzsche on Nihilism & the Death of God







Nietzsche on the Value of Truth

jueves, 8 de diciembre de 2016

Nietzsche on the Value of Truth






Will Durant---The Philosophy of Francis Bacon

Will Durant---The Philosophy of Francis Bacon