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Se muestran los artículos pertenecientes a Diciembre de 2015.

Aguantando hasta última hora

sábado, 18 de octubre de 2014

Aguantando hasta última hora

Aguantando hasta última hora

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Domingo, 06 de Diciembre de 2015 00:24. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Bibliografía sobre el realismo

sábado, 18 de octubre de 2014

Bibliografía sobre el realismo

—Una de ellas, sobre estética realista, procedente de mi Bibliografía de Teoría Literaria, Crítica y Filología. También tengo otras sobre novela realista, etc.

 

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Domingo, 06 de Diciembre de 2015 00:27. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Defensa de mi tesis sobre Beckett

sábado, 18 de octubre de 2014

Defensa de mi tesis sobre Beckett



En tres volúmenes:


Jose Angel Garcia Landa


Universidad de Zaragoza

1988


Defensa de la tesis doctoral de José Angel García Landa, "El relato en la trilogía de Beckett: 'Molloy', 'Malone Dies', 'The Unnamable'." El acto público de defensa se realizó en diciembre de 1988, y la tesis obtuvo la calificación máxima, apto "cum laude", y el Premio Extraordinario de Doctorado de la Universidad de Zaragoza (España).
 



(Defense of the Doctoral Thesis 'Narrative in Beckett's Trilogy: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable')

English abstract: A defense of José Angel García Landa's Ph.D. dissertation, "Narrative in Beckett's Trilogy: 'Molloy', 'Malone Dies', 'The Unnamable'". The public ceremony of defense took place in December 1988, and the thesis was awarded the highest mark, "apto 'cum laude'" and the Extraordinary Doctorate Prize of the University of Zaragoza (Spain).

En tres volúmenes:


Jose Angel Garcia Landa


Universidad de Zaragoza

1988


Defensa de la tesis doctoral de José Angel García Landa, "El relato en la trilogía de Beckett: 'Molloy', 'Malone Dies', 'The Unnamable'." El acto público de defensa se realizó en diciembre de 1988, y la tesis obtuvo la calificación máxima, apto "cum laude", y el Premio Extraordinario de Doctorado de la Universidad de Zaragoza (España).
 



(Defense of the Doctoral Thesis 'Narrative in Beckett's Trilogy: Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable')

English abstract: A defense of José Angel García Landa's Ph.D. dissertation, "Narrative in Beckett's Trilogy: 'Molloy', 'Malone Dies', 'The Unnamable'". The public ceremony of defense took place in December 1988, and the thesis was awarded the highest mark, "apto 'cum laude'" and the Extraordinary Doctorate Prize of the University of Zaragoza (Spain).

  

Aquí puede verse:

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." Universidad de Zaragoza, 1988. Online edition (2004):
http://www.unizar.es/departamentos/filologia_inglesa/garciala/publicaciones/defensa.html

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." Academia.edu 25 March 2014.*
https://www.academia.edu/6536400/

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." ResearchGate 18 Oct. 2014.
https://www.researchgate.net/publication/267029609
DOI: 10.13140/2.1.4826.3680

_____. "Defensa de la Tesis Doctoral 'El relato en la trilogía de Beckett Molloy, Malone Dies, The Unnamable." Social Science Research Network 27 Feb. 2015.*          
 http://ssrn.com/abstract=2569676         
 2015

 

 

—oOo— 

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Domingo, 06 de Diciembre de 2015 00:31. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Noh-Kabuki

lunes, 20 de octubre de 2014

Noh-Kabuki

Una exposición de estampas de teatro japonés que vemos en el Paraninfo de la Universidad de Zaragoza:


 noh-kabuki

—oOo—

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:35. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Carew and the Cavaliers

lunes, 20 de octubre de 2014

Carew and the Cavaliers

From Legouis and Cazamian's History of English Literature (The End of the Renascence, II: Poetry from 1625 to 1660).

1. Long Poems which were Failures.—At the death of James I, in 1625, Spenser's influence was almost exhausted, surviving only in Milton. It was Ben Jonson and especially John Donne who now had disciples and imitators. Poets were numerous down to the Restoration, but, except for Milton, they were the poets of the anthologies whose memory lives only in slight lyrics or collections of small poems.12 and to name them will sufficiently show how abundant was the production in this unfortunate genre.

The ambition to write works on a vast scale had not died out, but the efforts to realize it were failures. The epical ambition which was then common to Europe, and which produced more than one pitifully abortive poem in France, was no more successful in England. Long romances in verse and attempts at classical epics constitute what is dead in the literature of the time; their titles and the names of almost all their authors are forgotten. They have been collected only by the historical zeal of the present day, 
They consist of metrical romances, like Patrick Hannay's Sheretine and Mariana (1622), the Leoline and Sydanis (1642) of Sir Francis Kynaston, who had previouly modernized Chaucer's Troilus and Criseyde, and W. Chamberlayne's Pharonnida, in six books (1659). There are also mythological narratives; Shackerley Marmion's Cupid and Psyche (1637) and William Bosworth's Arcadius and Sepha (1651): long, religious narratives like Edward Benlowes's  Theophila, in nine cantos (1652), and epics like Davenant's Gondibert (1650), which is in quatrains, and Cowley's Davideis (1656), which is classical in manner and has a Hebrew theme.

Invariably poetic qualities and readable passages are scattered here and there in these ambitious works, but on the whole they were stillborn, and have no importance in literary thistory save that a path leads over their graves to Milton's Paradise Lost.

If dead poetry be left on one side, and the attempt be then made to classify the poets of the middle seventeenth century, they are seen to fall into two main groups, separated by the differences which make the history of this troubled period. There are first the secular poets, all in the Royalist ranks and therefore known as Cavaliers, and secondly there are religious poets, subdivided into the Anglicans and the Puritans. The division is social rather than literary, but it is simple and convenient, and corresponds sufficiently to the diversity of inspiration.


2. Thomas Carew (1598?-1639). –The poet who first, before the Civil War, showed what the spirit of the Cavaliers was to be, and first was affected by the combined influence of Jonson and Donne, was Thomas Carew, a gentleman of the court of Charles I who was a reputed wit. He was a courtly and polished love-poet whom his rivals suspected of working long at his elegant verses. The logical good order of the classicists rules his mind even when, in his poems to Celia, he returns to a theme of the Petrarchists. He can isolate a thought, follow it up faithfully and balance its several parts, and many of his light sets of verses have won, in consequence, a place in anthologies. He has little sensibility—he had indeed a reputation for dryness—but his sensual ardour enables him to avoid the coldness of gallantry. Such, in any case, is the character betrayed by his longest poems and his masterpiece, The Rapture, unfortunately no less indecent than the verses of Aretino. It is an invitation to Celia to flout 'the Giant Honour' and enjoy forbidden pleasures without scruple. The paradise he paints to her is one of the most licentious even of those inspired by the Italian Renaissance. His attack on honour recalls Sidney's Astrophel and especially Donne's Elegies. He is also inspired by the speeches of Petronius in the anonymous tragedy Nero (Act IV, sc. vii), but in libertine audacity he outdoes his models.
carew
Carew is connected with Donne by the fine elegy with which he honoured his memory. The poem has more feeling than is customary with Carew and is, moreover, one of the best pieces of criticism written in this period. No one has pointed out more accurately than Carew what was new in Donne, his contempt for outworn ornament and his need of personal and virile expression. Yet Donne left few traces upon his style. If Carew has none of the master's flashes of genius, he escapes the worst faults of his style. In his commendatory verses he shows that his thought was vigorous and direct, especially in those to Georges Sandys, who, after translating Ovid, gave up secular poetry and translated the Psalms. Carew confesses that he dare not greet 'the holy place with his unhallowed feet', but that his muse, like 'devout penitents of old', stays 'humbly waiting at the porch,' listening to the sacred strains. Yet he thinks that one day his eyes,

Now hunting glow-worms, may adore the sun,


and that:

My eyes in penitential dew may steep
That brine which they for sensual love did weep.


The poem is beautiful, and so restrained that it seems sincere. It is consistent with Clarendon's account of the poet's edifying death.

His was, however, a death-bed conversion. All his poetry is the work of an amorist, such as Milton despised. He writers 'persuasions' to love, madrigals, complaints and reproaches, addressed to a mistress, lines to his 'inconstant mistress,' who shall be 'damned for ther false apostasy,' to Celia singing, to Celia when he sends her red and white roses:

In the white you may discover
The paleness of a fainting lover;
In the red, the flames still feeding
On my heart with fresh wounds bleeding.


In the famous song, Ask me no more, he finds all the beauties of nature united in his mistress—the rose of June

For in your beauties, orient deep,
These flowers, as in their causes, sleep;


the 'golden atoms of the day' which 'enrich her hair,' the nightingale's song:

For in your sweet dividing throat,
She winters, and keeps warm her note.


The theme is commonplace, but in the harmonious quatrains of this song it is turned with perfect elegance.

Carew's work is slight, much distilled, but some warmth of imagination and a certain fancy temper its coldness. The style and the versification are so polished that Waller and Denham the acknowledged pioneers of the classical school, could hardly improve on them.

3. The Cavalier Poets. —Carew is the typical court poet. Sir John Suckling (1609-42) 3 typifies the Cavaliers, their loyalty, dash, petulancy, frivolity, easy morals, and wit. Rich, spendthrift, valiant, a gamester and a gallant, an amateur of the drama who wrote four not unsuccessful plays, and a faithful admirer of Shakespeare, Suckling mocked at the pains which Carew took to polish his verses. He was himself an improviser, one whose work is very unequal but who writers with irresistible swing. It is his light, impertinent tone which characterises him. He recalls Donne when he rallies woman on her capriciousness or himself on his inconstancy; but while he has the master's hyperbole he leaves his metaphysics alone. He discharges his mockery in the form of little, swiftly moving, neatly turned songs, irony sometimes hiding the madrigal, as in Out upon it.  His easy and flippancy are French rather than English, and it has been thought that a sojourn which he made in France before he was twenty influenced his muse. Less slight than the rest of his work is the Ballad upon a Wedding in which a farmer describes, in picturesque language, a wedding at which he has been present. Here there are many lively and homely descriptive touches, as well as wit and spirit. Suckling puts new life and freshness into the conventional epithalamium. Not until Thomas Moore did any one else show such skill at writing charming verses about nothing. 'Natural, easy Suckling,' as Congreve's Millamant calls him, whose life was short and who versified only as a pastime, had a considerable production. Beneath his apparent frivolity there was, as his poems prove, romantic generosity, and even, as his letter to Henry Jermyn shows, a power of reflecting on politics. His treatise, An Account of Religion by Reason, in which he combats the Socinian heresies, is proof that he also cared for religion. The contrasts in him are characteristic of a time in which libertinage often rubbed shoulders with piety.

Richard Lovelace (1618-58)4 was neither so correct as Carew nor so natural as Suckling. This most handsome Cavalier whose figure fascinated the ladies, this faithful follower of the king who was twice imprisoned and finally ruined for the cause, so that he ended his short life in the most abject poverty, was a very unequal poet. In his Lucasta (1649) the cold, hyperbolical compliments of the degenerate sonneteers occur side by side with Donne's obscure extravagance. The lack of art in his work is as apparent as its mannerisms, and almost all of it has been forgotten. But it was his fortune to make two or three songs in which his sense of honour is in manly alliance with his love. It was he who wrote to Althea from prison:

Stone walls do not a prison make,
    Nor iron bars a cage;
Minds innocent and quiet take
    That for an hermitage.
If I have freedom in my love,
    And in my soul am free,
Angels alone that soar above
    Enjoy such liberty.


It was he who wrote 'to Lucasta on going to the wars':

I could not love thee, dear, so much,
Loved I not honour more.


Because of these few short poems, Lovelace has the glory of having expressed the ideal of the Cavalier.

He shares it with Montrose (1612-50), the noble Scottish champion of Charles I, whose brilliant victories were followed by disaster, death, and quartering, if the Royalist hero of Scotland really wrote the fine loyalist verses attributed to him.

John Cleveland (1613-58),5 a Royalist like these other poets, who, unlike them, was of humble origin, was very different from them. He was, above all, a satirist, and he enjoyed in his own century a popularity which his vigour and his wit deserved. But his countless slight topical allusions make him difficult to read to-day. He was, moreover, one of Donne's most determined imitators, and conceits abound in his poems. The best known of them is The Rebel Scot, a fiery attack on the nation which had just delivered Charles I to the Parliament. This satirist, with his rude style, often, while turning an epigram, wrote such isolated couplets as Dryden affected, and in spite of his metaphysical strangeness he blazed the track of political satire for that poet. He did not, however, write only satires. He composed love-poetry in which a touch of real nature varies, from time to time, the extravagant gallantry, and he made some curious lyrical essays in which he was one of the first poets to realize the value of the anapaest.

It is tempting to connect Lord Herbert of Cherbury (1583-1648), 6 George Herbert's elder brother, with these Royalist poets. He is, because of his curious Autobiography, better known for his prose than for his verses, which contain a suble quintessence of poetry. His handsome person, his extravagant valour, his passion for duelling, and his refined gallantry made him a representative Cavalier, and his Ode upon a Question moved, whether Love should continue for ever, gives him a high place among the Petrarchists and the disciples of Sir Philip Sidney.

4. Robert Herrick. —Midway between the Cavaliers and the Anglicans, Robert Herrick (1591-1674),7 the most gifted and the most exquisite of all these poets, has place. The anacreontiscism of the poetry of his youth makes him one of the Cavaliers, and since, at the age of thiry-eight, he accepted a Devonshire living and did his best to convert his muse, he is also to be numbered among the Anglicans. His only collection of poems, the Hesperides, published in 1648, contains his 'works both human and divine.' The former consist of 1,129 short sets of verses, the latter of only 271, and the proportion may be taken to that in which his inspiration was secular and sacred.

The son of a London goldsmith, who from Cambridge returned to London and a life of dissipation, who in the reign of James I, while his youth lasted, was a frequenter of the literary taverns, this lover of wine, women and song, and 'son' of Ben Jonson, was induced to take orders only for the sake of a livelihood. When he bade a sad farewell to London and his muse and departed to his living of Dean Prior, in Devonshire, he resolved, like a man of honour, to be a good parson. But he had no enthusiasm for his new duties. The change was too great for this charming rhymester cast up among the savages. He petted both his muse and a few of his female parishioners. Then, little by little, helped by his recollections of pastorals, he acquired a taste for the rich countryside in which he found himself and for the ways of rustic life. He became attached also to his church and his little vicarage; he trusted in the good people's God, to whose infinite indulgence he could leave the frolics of his youth and certain lapses of his maturity, whose anger would not be roused because the very secular Hesperides were printed side by side with the Holy Numbers [Noble Numbers]. 'Jocund his muse was, but his life was chaste,' he said of himself. It was self-flattery. His portrait at the beginning of the Hesperides shows a torso like that of a merry Priapus, a sensuous, mocking mouth beneath an aquiline nose, a head bristling with crisp, luxuriant hair, a chest left bare. This is a real pagan from a garden where Cupids dance in a ring, while Pegasus, standing on a hillock, is poised for flight.

Herrick's works are by themselves an anthology, a collection of short poems brought together on no principle and without any order. He adopts 'sweet disorder' as an aesthetic principle, loves it in poetry as much as in woman's dress. He goes further and mingles the coarsest epigrams with poetry that is winged and delicate. Every contradiction of his mobile spirit, all his fleeting feelings and thoughs, are grouped haphazard. Even his 'many dainty mistresses' sometimes clash, and we can only hope that, if they were real, they were successive. He hates monotony, sharing the national craving for variety so conspicuous in the drama. He alternates the pretty with the ugly, the fragant with the evil-smelling. But nothing really counts in his works except its quality of exquisiteness, of which there is in profusion.hesperides

On occasion, Herrick was capable of sustained effort. He has some epithalamiums and some rustic pieces, like the Hock Cart, or Harvest Home, which have spirit and savour. One of the most famous of his poems is Corinna's going a-Maying, which contains five fourteen-line stanzas. It is among the most charming of songs of the dawn, fragant with flowers, rich as a poem by Spenser, and it has the merest hint of the ingenious fancy of the metaphysical poets:

Rise, and put on your foliage, and be seen
To come forth, like the spring-time, fresh and green,
     And sweet as Flora.


This poem has become the classic of all the English songs on May.

But Herrick's truest imprint is on that multitude of tiny poems which seem to be made of a breath of air—charming madrigals, love-fancies, addresses to flowers, brief epitaphs. The light joy of a frivolous heart, a fancy pleased by whatever has grace or beauty; the tenous melancholy of a reveller who remembers how ephemeral is that which charms him; such are his moods, and to the latter of them he returns again and again as he watches the flowers in his garden—the roses, the daffodils, the blossoms of the fruit-trees, the meadows whih 'have been fresh and green' and are left 'to lament.' The esssence of this mood is in a trifle about cherry-blossoms:

Ye may simper, blush and smile,
And perfume the air awhile;
But, sweet things, ye must be goine,
Fruit, ye know, is coming on;
Then, ah! then, where is your grace,
Whenas cherries come in place?


Never again did a poet of the west have so light a touch. The secret seems to be kept by Japan or China.

His epitaphs are endlessly graceful. They do not weigh down the graves on which they are but poised with the delicate grace of flowers, for instance this upon a child:

Virgins promised when I died
That they would each primrose-tide
Duly, morn, and evening, come,
And with flowers dress my tomb.
Having promised, pay your debt,
Maids, and here strew violets.


When this voluptuary was in bed with fever he called on music to dispel his pain:

     Then make me weep
     My pains asleep;
And give me such reposes
     That I, poor I,
     May think thereby
     I live and die
         'Mongst roses.


Everywhere his simplicity is seasoned with a strangeness—Mad Maid's Song, Grace for a Child, The Night-piece, to Julia. He is inspired by the Anthology and by Jonson, who had made fine translations from it; but while Jonson took extreme pains, Herrick seems to sing spontaneously. He can be reminiscent, recalling Marlowe's pastoral or Shakespeare's fairies or Herbert's pious verses, but whatever he takes is transposed and lightened. He reverses La Fontaine's otherwise just verdict on the English, that they 'think profoundly.' Herrick thinks, feels, and writes lightly. He touches nothing; he barely skims its surface. For he was without moral sense. He knew only delicate enjoyment, neither satiety, passion, nor remorse. He is the most epicurean of the moderns. His life, in the time of the Civil War and so near to Milton, seems a defiance. His metres, fluid as water, and his delicately varied stanzas, are surprising in their proximity to regularized verse, to the couplet which Waller and Denham fixed and stabilized and which increasingly became the vehicle of didacticism. Herrick, born in the Elizabethan age, was in the succeeding period the perfect artist in slight verse, while Milton, with his sovereign art, reigned over grander poetry.

5. The Anglican and Catholic Poets. Herrick, a pagan clergyman, represents no more than the lax Anglicanism of his time. The renewal of faith within the Catholic Church, provoked by the Protestant attacks, had its counterpart in England in the revived fervour of the Anglican clergy whom the Presbyterians attacked. We have seen the effects of their stimulated zeal in the prose of preachers and controversialists, and it also left its mark on poetry. Hooker had exemplified Anglican weightiness and the Anglican grasp of political principles. In the seventeenth century the ardour of many Anglicans reached even to mysticism. The pious fervour shown under James I by the brothers Phineas and Giles Fletcher became widespread under Charles I and during the persecutions of the Commonwealth. Reason became the ally, sometimes the subordinate, of imagination and sentiment. Fancy and a certain singularity were added to them, partly in consequence of the changed literary models. Poets were inspired no longer by Spenser but by Donne, whose influence was even more marked on the pious poets than on the Cavaliers.

This double tendency perceptible under Charles I and during Laud's tenure of power, on the one hand towards the restoration of the religious practices, the material accompaniments and the very millinery of Catholic ritual, and on the other towards a renewal of monastic asceticism, was combined with a taste for the metaphysical element in the sometimes truly beautiful and always curious writings of such as Herbert, Crashaw, Vaughan, and Traherne.

(....)



Notes (renumbered)

1. E. Gosse, Seventeenth Century Studies (1883); B. Wendell, The Seventeenth Century in English Literature (1904).
    Collections of verse: Cavalier and Courtier Lyrists (Canterbury Poets, 1891); G. Saintsbury, Seventeenth Century Lyrists (undated); J. H. Massingham, A Treasury of Seventeenth Century English Verse (1919; H. J. C. Grierson, 
Metaphysical Lyrics and Poems of the Seventeenth Century (1921).

2. Minor Poets of the Caroline Period, ed. Saintsbury, 3 vols. (Clarendon Press, 1906-21).

3. Poems, Plays, and Other Remains of Sir John Suckling, ed. Hazlitt, 2 vols. (1892); The Works of Sir John Suckling, ed. Thompson (1910).

4. Lucasta, ed. Hazlitt (2nd ed. 1897).

5. Edited by Saintsbury in Minor Poets of the Caroline Period, vol. iii; The Poems of John Cleveland, ed. Berdan (1911).

6. His poems were published by Collins in 1881, and were edited by G. C. Moore Smith for the Clarendon Press (Poems English and Latin) in 1923.
    See Rémusat, Herbert de Cherbury (Paris, 1874).

7. Hesperides, ed. by Pollard, with introduction by Swinburne, in the Muses' Library, 2 vols. (1891); by Saintsbury in the Aldine Poets Series, 2 vols. (1893); by Rhys in Everyman's Library (1908); by F. W. Moorman (1921).
    See F. W. Moorman, Robert Herrick, a Biographical and Critical Study (1910); F. Delattre, Contribution à l'étude de la poésie anglaise au XVIIe siècle (1910; the capital work on Herrick).






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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:37. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Con la guitarra cerca del mar

martes, 21 de octubre de 2014

Con la guitarra cerca del mar

Con la guitarra cerca del mar

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 23:40. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


En el Anthro

martes, 21 de octubre de 2014

En el Anthro

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 23:41. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Sigo Subiendo en el SSRN

martes, 21 de octubre de 2014

Sigo subiendo en el SSRN


Sigo subiendo en el SSRN



Llegando al puesto 27 (de 270.000) en número de artículos subidos este año; al puesto 29 por número de artículos subidos, y al puesto 828 por número de descargas:


Captura de pantalla 2014-10-22 a la(s) 00.02.26

Y de Author Rank global estoy en el puesto 2284, y subiendo. De entre esos 270.000.



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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 23:43. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Internet


Guitarra y playa

miércoles, 22 de octubre de 2014

Guitarra y playa

Guitarra y playa 2

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 23:45. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Aquí estoy, en Teoría

miércoles, 22 de octubre de 2014

Aquí estoy, en Teoría

Figuro como referencia, gracias a mi bibliografía, no sólo en el artículo sobre Teoría Literaria, de la Wikipedia española, junto a un puñadito pequeño de teorizadores españoles—


... sino también, y allí hay menos españoles, en la Teoría Literaria de la Wikipedia en inglés.  Y en la alemana



—oOo—

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 23:46. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


CFP Research in the Humanities

sábado, 18 de octubre de 2014

CFP: Research in the Humanities

Ctrl-Z: New Media Philosophy
The editors invite submissions to a forthcoming special issue of Ctrl-Z: New Media Philosophy on the question of ‘research’ in the humanities today. What counts as research; what doesn’t; and who decides? 
Does the traditional distinction between critical and creative work still hold? Is creative work, or any form of non-traditional academic work (i.e. whatever doesn’t conform to a notion of the standard academic essay), quantifiable and measurable according to an idea of research modelled on a certain conception of science? 

And who or what is humanities research for? What are its most appropriate or effective means of dissemination, and what kinds of effects might be expected of it once—if—it reaches its proposed destination?

The editors have begun to address these questions in earlier issues—see Briggs & Lucy, ‘Art as Research?’, for example—but there are many other possible responses.
Ctrl-Z welcomes contributions in a variety of forms, including:
Essays between 3,000 and 6,000 words
Reviews (books, films, exhibitions, performances, etc.), up to 2,000 words
Audio-visual texts
Short fiction/creative nonfiction between 3,000 and 6,000 words
Poetry 
Contributors are encouraged to incorporate images in their work, and the journal favours multidisciplinary approaches.
The issue is scheduled for publication in 2015, and the deadline for submissions is 31 December 2014For the journal’s preferred style of presentation, see previous issues.
Email submissions to Robert Briggs <R.Briggs@curtin.edu.au>.

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:23. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


El barrio de la casa de las mansardas azules

domingo, 19 de octubre de 2014

El barrio de la casa de las mansardas azules

El barrio de la casa de las mansardas azules

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:23. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


En el Cognition & the Arts eJournal

Un par de capítulos sobre Beckett tengo en el COGNITION AND THE ARTS eJOURNAL, con fechas 10 y 17 octubre 2014: http://papers.ssrn.com/sol3/JELJOUR_Results.cfm…

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:25. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica




En el principio era la Palabra

domingo, 19 de octubre de 2014

En el principio era la Palabra

Aquí nos citan, en rumano:


Mamulea, Mona. "La început a fost povestea: Despre functia cognitiva a naratiunii în mitologie si stiinta." In Simpozionul National 'Constantin Noica': Editia a IV-a: "La Început era cuvântul." ["In the Beginning Was the Word"]. Bucarest: Editura Academiai Romane, 2013.   35-41


https://es.scribd.com/doc/175934358/

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:27. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Semiótica


Barco incendiado en Beluso

lunes, 20 de octubre de 2014

Barco incendiado en Beluso

Barco incendiado en Beluso

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:28. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Bibliografía sobre Sigmund Freud

lunes, 20 de octubre de 2014

Bibliografía sobre Sigmund Freud

Bibliografía de y sobre Sigmund Freud—en relación a la crítica literaria mayormente:


(POCO DURAN EN RED ESTAS COSAS, SEGÚN VEO...)

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:31. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Poems by Edmund Waller

lunes, 20 de octubre de 2014

Poems by Edmund Waller

 


From the "Waller Family" website

Edmund Waller (1606-1687)


Edmund Waller, the poet, was born at Coleshill, 3 March 1606 and died at Beaconsfield 21 Oct 1687. He married, first, Anne Banks of London, 5 Jul 1631, and, second, Mary Breeze (or Breaux). He was educated at Eton and King’s College, Cambridge, and was returned a member of Parliament for Amersham before he was 18 years old. In 1625 he was returned for Chipping-Wycombe, and sat for other places in several Parliaments, including the Long Parliament.

Edmund and Sir William Waller, the Parliamentary General, were fifth cousins, one generation removed, and, though Sir William was nine years older, they were, essentially, contemporaries.

After Anne Banks’ death in 1634, Edmund courted Lady Dorothea Sydney, whom he celebrated in his verses under the name "Sacharissa" , and Lady Sophia Murray, whom he distinguished by the name of "Amoret", both without success’.

In Parliament, he at first opposed the Roundheads or liberal party, but retained his place in the Long Parliament openly expressing his royalist sentiments after the Civil War began. He was sent as a Commissioner from Parliament to the King. 

About this time occurred the incident called "Waller’s Plot", which failed. It's nature is obscure, though Edmund made an abject confession of all he knew, including the names of his confederates, including his brother-in-law, Nathaniel Tomkins, who was put to death over it. Edmund was imprisoned for a year, fined 10,000 pounds and exiled.

During this exile, the first book of his poems was published in 1645. Oliver Cromwell rose to power in 1644 and was Lord Protector in 1649, so Edmund’s unfortunate political scheme, occurred during the trying times of the Civil War. In 1653 he obtained permission from Cromwell to return to England and in 1654 he addressed a poem of elaborate praises to the Lord Protector. In 1656 he recommended Cromwell to assume the royal title. 

Edmund again sat in Parliament, at intervals, until the reign of James II (1685-1688). One critic says, "His popularity in Parliament was great, but he did not take pains to understand its business, but only sought to gain applause, being a vain and empty, though a witty man." His poetry was celebrated for elegance and polish at a time when these graces had been largely replaced with moral depravity. Macaulay says, "The verse of Waller still breathed the sentiments which had animated a more chivalrous generation."




Selected poems:

 

To the King On His Navy (c. 1628)

Where'er thy navy spreads her canvas wings,
Homage to thee, and peace to all she brings;
The French and Spaniard, when thy flags appear,
Forget their hatred, and consent to fear.
So Jove from Ida did both hosts survey.
And when he pleased to thunder, part the fray.
Ships heretofore in seas like fishes sped,
The mightiest still upon the smallest fed;
Thou on the deep imposest nobler laws,
And by that justice hast removed the cause
Of those rude tempests, which for rapine sent,
Too oft, alas, involved the innocent.
Now shall the ocean, as thy Thames, be free
>From both those fates of storms and piracy:
But we most happy, who can fear no force
But winged troops or Pegasean horse.
'Tis not so hard for greedy foes to spoil
Another nation as to touch our soil.
Should nature's self invade the world again,
And o'er the center spread the liquid main,
Thy power were safe, and her destructive hand
Would but enlarge the bounds of thy command;
Thy dreadful fleet would style thee lord of all,
And ride in triumph o'er the drowned ball;
Those towers of oak o'er fertile plains might go,
And visit mountains where they once did grow.

The world's restorer never could endure
That finished Babel should those men secure
Whose pride designed that fabric to have stood
Above the reach of any second flood;
To thee, his chosen, more indulgent, he
Dares trust such power with so much piety.




Upon the Late Storm (c 1628)
And Death of His Highness Ensuing the Same

We must resign! Heaven his great soul does claim
In storms, as loud as his immortal fame;
His dying groans, his last breath, shakes our isle,
And trees uncut fall for his funeral pile.
About his palace their broad roots are tossed
Into the air: So Romulus was lost.
New Rome in such a tempest missed her king,
And from obeying fell to worshipping.
On Oeta's top thus Hercules lay dead,
With ruined oaks and pines about him spread;
The poplar, too, whose bough he wont to wear
On his victorious head, lay prostrate there.
Those his last fury from the mountain rent;
Our dying hero from the continent
Ravished whole towns, and forts from Spaniards reft,
As his last legacy to Britain left.
The ocean, which so long our hopes confined,
Could give no limits to his vaster mind;
Our bounds' enlargement was his latest toil,
Nor hath he left us prisoners to our isle.
Under the tropic is our language spoke,
And part of Flanders hath received our yoke.
>From civil broils he did us disengage,
Found nobler objects for our martial rage:
And, with wise conduct, to his country showed
Their ancient way of conquering abroad.
Ungrateful then, if we no tears allow
To him that gave us peace and empire too.
Princes, that feared him, grieve, concerned to see
No pitch of glory from the grave is free.
Nature herself took notice of his death,
And, sighing, swelled the sea with such a breath
That to remotest shores her billows rolled,
The approaching fate of her great ruler told.




ON A GIRDLE
That which her slender waist confin'd,
Shall now my joyful temples bind;
No monarch but would give his crown,
His arms might do what this has done.
It was my heaven's extremest sphere,
The pale which held that lovely deer,
My joy, my grief, my hope, my love,
Did all within this circle move.
A narrow compass, and yet there
Dwelt all that's good, and all that's fair;
Give me but what this ribbon bound,
Take all the rest the sun goes round.



Song: [Go lovely rose] (c. 1645)

Tell her that wastes her time and me,
That now she knows,
When I resemble her to thee,
How sweet and fair she seems to be.
Tell her that's young,
And shuns to have her graces spied,
That hadst thou sprung
In deserts, where no men abide,
Thou must have uncommended died.
Small is the worth
Of beauty from the light retir'd:
Bid her come forth,
Suffer herself to be desir'd,
And not blush so to be admir'd.
Then die, that she
The common fate of all things rare
May read in thee;
How small a part of time they share
That are so wondrous sweet and fair.




THE STORY OF PHOEBUS AND DAPHNE, APPLIED

Thyrsis, a youth of the inspired train,
Fair Sacharissa lov'd, but lov'd in vain;
Like Phoebus sung the no less amorous boy;
Like Daphne she, as lovely, and as coy;
With numbers he the flying nymph pursues,
With numbers such as Phoebus' self might use;
Such is the chase when Love and Fancy leads,
O'er craggy mountains, and through flow'ry meads;
Invok'd to testify the lover's care,
Or form some image of his cruel fair:
Urg'd with his fury, like a wounded deer,
O'er these he fled; and now approaching near,
Had reach'd the nymph with his harmonious lay,
Whom all his charms could not incline to stay.
Yet what he sung in his immortal strain,
Though unsuccessful, was not sung in vain;
All but the nymph that should redress his wrong,
Attend his passion, and approve his song.
Like Phoebus thus, acquiring unsought praise,
He catch'd at love, and fill'd his arm with bays.


The Dancer

Behold the brand of beauty tossed!
See how the motion does dilate the flame!
Delighted love his spoils does boast,
And triumph in this game.
Fire, to no place confined,
Is both our wonder and our fear;
Moving the mind,
As lightning hurled through air.

High heaven the glory does increase
Of all her shining lamps, this artful way;
The sun in figures, such as these,
Joys with the moon to play.
To the sweet strains they all advance,
Which do result from their own spheres,
As this nymph's dance
Moves with the numbers which she hears.




The Self Banished (c. 1645)

It is not that I love you less
Than when before your feet I lay,
But to prevent the sad increase
Of hopeless love, I keep away.
In vain (alas!) for everything
Which I have known belong to you,
Your form does to my fancy bring,
And makes my old wounds bleed anew
Who in the spring from the new sun
Already has a fever got,
Too late begins those shafts to shun,
Which Ph{oe}bus through his veins has shot.
Too late he would the pain assuage,
And to thick shadows does retire;
About with him he bears the rage,
And in his tainted blood the fire.
But vow'd I have, and never must
Your banish'd servant trouble you;
For if I break, you may distrust
The vow I made to love you, too.





A Panegyric
To my Lord Protector, of the Present Greatness, and Joint Interest, of His Highness, and this Nation

While with a strong and yet a gentle hand,
You bridle faction, and our hearts command,
Protect us from ourselves, and from the foe,
Make us unite, and make us conquer too;

Let partial spirits still aloud complain,
Think themselves injured that they cannot reign,
And own no liberty but where they may
Without control upon their fellows prey.

Above the waves as Neptune showed his face,
To chide the winds, and save the Trojan race,
So has your Highness, raised above the rest,
Storms of ambition, tossing us, repressed.

Your drooping country, torn with civil hate,
Restored by you, is made a glorious state;
The seat of empire, where the Irish come,
And the unwilling Scotch, to fetch their doom.

The sea's our own; and now all nations greet,
With bending sails, each vessel of our fleet;
Your power extends as far as winds can blow,
Or swelling sails upon the globe may go.

Heaven, (that has placed this island to give law,
To balance Europe, and her states to awe)
In this conjunction does on Britain smile;
The greatest leader, and the greatest isle!

Whether this portion of the world were rent,
By the rude ocean, from the continent;
Or thus created; it was sure designed
To be the sacred refuge of mankind.

Hither the oppressed shall henceforth resort,
Justice to crave, and succour, at your court;
And then your Highness, not for ours alone,
But for the world's protector shall be known.

Fame, swifter than your winged navy, flies
Through every land that near the ocean lies,
Sounding your name, and telling dreadful news
To all that piracy and rapine use.

With such a chief the meanest nation blessed,
Might hope to lift her head above the rest;
What may be thought impossible to do
For us, embraced by the sea and you?

Lords of the world's great waste, the ocean, we
Whole forests send to reign upon the sea,
And every coast may trouble, or relieve;
But none can visit us without your leave.

Angels and we have this prerogative,
That none can at our happy seat arrive;
While we descend at pleasure, to invade
The bad with vengeance, and the good to aid.

Our little world, the image of the great,
Like that, amidst the boundless ocean set,
Of her own growth has all that Nature craves;
And all that's rare, as tribute from the waves.

As Egypt does not on the clouds rely,
But to her Nile owes more than to the sky;
So what our earth, and what our heaven, denies,
Our ever constant friend, the sea, supplies.

The taste of hot Arabia's spice we know,
Free from the scorching sun that makes it grow;
Without the worm, in Persian silks we shine;
And, without planting, drink of every vine.

To dig for wealth we weary not our limbs;
Gold, though the heaviest metal, hither swims;
Ours is the harvest where the Indians mow;
We plough the deep, and reap what others sow.

Things of the noblest kind our own soil breeds;
Stout are our men, and warlike are our steeds;
Rome, though her eagle through the world had flown,
Could never make this island all her own.

Here the Third Edward, and the Black Prince, too,
France-conquering Henry flourished, and now you;
For whom we stayed, as did the Grecian state,
Till Alexander came to urge their fate.

When for more worlds the Macedonian cried,
He wist not Thetis in her lap did hide
Another yet; a world reserved for you,
To make more great than that he did subdue.

He safely might old troops to battle lead,
Against the unwarlike-Persian, and the Mede,
Whose hasty flight did, from the bloodless field,
More spoil than honour to the victor yield.

A race unconquered, by their clime made bold,
The Caledonians, armed with want and cold,
Have, by a fate indulgent to your fame,
Been from all ages kept for you to tame.

Whom the old Roman wall so ill confined,
With a new chain of garrisons you bind;
Here foreign gold no more shall make them come;
Our English iron holds them fast at home.

They, that henceforth must be content to know
No warmer region, than their hills of snow,
May blame the sun, but must extol your grace,
Which in our senate has allowed them place.

Preferred by conquest, happily o'erthrown,
Falling they rise, to be with us made one;
So kind dictators made, when they came home,
Their vanquished foes free citizens of Rome.

Like favour find the Irish, with like fate,
Advanced to be a portion of our state;
While by your valour and your courteous mind,
Nations, divided by the sea, are joined.

Holland, to gain your friendship, is content
To be our outguard on the continent;
She from her fellow-provinces would go,
Rather than hazard to have you her foe.

In our late fight, when cannons did diffuse,
Preventing posts, the terror and the news,
Our neighbour princes trembled at their roar;
But our conjunction makes them tremble more.

Your never-failing sword made war to cease;
And now you heal us with the arts of peace;
Our minds with bounty and with awe engage,
Invite affection, and restrain our rage.

Less pleasure take brave minds in battles won,
Than in restoring such as are undone;
Tigers have courage, and the rugged bear,
But man alone can, whom he conquers, spare.

To pardon willing, and to punish loath,
You strike with one hand, but you heal with both;
Lifting up all that prostrate lie, you grieve
You cannot make the dead again to live.

When fate, or error. had our age misled,
And o'er these nations such confusion spread,
The only cure, which could from Heaven come down,
Was so much power and clemency in one!

One! whose extraction from an ancient line
Gives hope again that well-born men may shine;
The meanest in your nature, mild and good,
The noble rest secured in your blood.

Oft have we wondered how you hid in peace
A mind proportioned to such things as these;
How such a ruling spirit you could restrain,
And practise first over yourself to reign.

Your private life did a just pattern give,
How fathers, husbands, pious sons should live;
Born to command, your princely virtues slept,
Like humble David's, while the flock he kept.

But when your troubled country called you forth,
Your flaming courage, and your matchless worth,
Dazzling the eyes of all that did pretend,
To fierce contention gave a prosperous end.

Still as you rise, the state, exalted too,
Finds no distemper while 'tis changed by you;
Changed like the world's great scene! when, without noise,
The rising sun night's vulgar light destroys.

Had you, some ages past, this race of glory
Run, with amazement we should read your story;
But living virtue, all achievements past,
Meets envy still, to grapple with at last.

This Cæsar found; and that ungrateful age,
With losing him fell back to blood and rage;
Mistaken Brutus thought to break their yoke,
But cut the bond of union with that stroke.

That sun once set, a thousand meaner stars
Gave a dim light to violence, and wars,
To such a tempest as now threatens all,
Did not your mighty arm prevent the fall.

If Rome's great senate could not wield that sword,
Which of the conquered world had made them lord,
What hope had ours, while yet their power was new,
To rule victorious armies, but by you?

You! that had taught them to subdue their foes,
Could order teach, and their high spirits compose;
To every duty could their minds engage,
Provoke their courage, and command their rage.

So when a lion shakes his dreadful mane,
And angry grows, if he that first took pain
To tame his youth approach the haughty beast,
He bends to him, but frights away the rest.

As the vexed world, to find repose, at last
Itself into Augustus' arms did cast;
So England now does, with like toil oppressed,
Her weary head upon your bosom rest.

Then let the Muses, with such notes as these,
Instruct us what belongs unto our peace;
Your battles they hereafter shall indite,
And draw the image of our Mars in fight;

Tell of towns stormed, or armies overrun,
And mighty kingdoms by your conduct won;
How, while you thundered, clouds of dust did choke
Contending troops, and seas lay hid in smoke.

Illustrious acts high raptures do infuse,
And every conqueror creates a muse.
Here, in low strains, your milder deeds we sing;
But there, my lord; we'll bays and olive bring

To crown your head; while you in triumph ride
O'er vanquished nations, and the sea beside;
While all your neighbour-princes unto you,
Like Joseph's sheaves, pay reverence, and bow.




To the King
Upon His Majesty's Happy Return

The rising sun complies with our weak sight,
First gilds the clouds, then shows his globe of light
At such a distance from our eyes, as though
He knew what harm his hasty beams would do.

But your full majesty at once breaks forth
In the meridian of your reign. Your worth,
Your youth, and all the splendour of your state,
(Wrapped up, till now, in clouds of adverse fate!)
With such a flood of light invade our eyes,
And our spread hearts with so great joy surprise,
That if your grace incline that we should live,
You must not, sir! too hastily forgive.
Our guilt preserves us from the excess of joy,
Which scatters spirits, and would life destroy.
All are obnoxious! and this faulty land,
Like fainting Esther, does before you stand,
Watching your sceptre. The revolted sea
Trembles to think she did your foes obey.

Great Britain, like blind Polypheme, of late,
In a wild rage, became the scorn and hate
Of her proud neighbours, who began to think
She, with the weight of her own force, would sink.
But you are come, and all their hopes are vain;
This giant isle has got her eye again.
Now she might spare the ocean, and oppose
Your conduct to the fiercest of her foes.
Naked, the Graces guarded you from all
Dangers abroad; and now your thunder shall.
Princes that saw you, different passions prove,
For now they dread the object of their love;
Nor without envy can behold his height,
Whose conversation was their late delight.
So Semele, contented with the rape
Of Jove disguised in a mortal shape,
When she beheld his hands with lightning filled,
And his bright rays, was with amazement killed.

And though it be our sorrow, and our crime,
To have accepted life so long a time
Without you here, yet does this absence gain
No small advantage to your present reign;
For, having viewed the persons and the things,
The councils, state, and strength of Europe's kings,
You know your work; ambition to restrain,
And set them bounds, as Heaven does to the main.
We have you now with ruling wisdom fraught,
Not such as books, but such as practice, taught.
So the lost sun, while least by us enjoyed,
Is the whole night for our concern employed;
He ripens spices, fruits, and precious gums,
Which from remotest regions hither comes.

This seat of yours (from the other world removed)
Had Archimedes known, he might have proved
His engine's force fixed here. Your power and skill
Make the world's motion wait upon your will.

Much suffering monarch! the first English born
That has the crown of these three nations worn!
How has your patience, with the barbarous rage
Of your own soil, contended half an age?
Till (your tried virtue, and your sacred word,
At last preventing your unwilling sword)
Armies and fleets which kept you out so long,
Owned their great sovereign, and redressed his wrong.
When straight the people, by no force compelled,
Nor longer from their inclination held,
Break forth at once, like powder set on fire,
And, with a noble rage, their King required;
So the injured sea, which from her wonted course,
To gain some acres, avarice did force,
If the new banks, neglected once, decay,
No longer will from her old channel stay;
Raging, the late got land she overflows,
And all that's built upon't, to ruin goes.

Offenders now, the chiefest, do begin
To strive for grace, and expiate their sin.
All winds blow fair, that did the world embroil;
Your vipers treacle yield, and scorpions oil.

If then such praise the Macedonian got,
For having rudely cut the Gordian knot,
What glory's due to him that could divide
Such ravelled interests; has the knot untied,
And without stroke so smooth a passage made,
Where craft and malice such impeachments laid?

But while we praise you, you ascribe it all
To His high hand, which threw the untouched wall
Of self-demolished Jericho so low;
His angel 'twas that did before you go,
Tamed savage hearts, and made affections yield,
Like ears of corn when wind salutes the field.

Thus patience crowned, like Jobs's, your trouble ends,
Having your foes to pardon, and your friends;
For, though your courage were so firm a rock,
What private virtue could endure the shock?
Like your Great Master, you the storm withstood,
And pitied those who love with frailty showed.

Rude Indians, torturing all the royal race,
Him with the throne and dear-bought sceptre grace
That suffers best. What region could be found,
Where your herioc head had not been crowned?

The next experience of your mighty mind
Is how you combat fortune, now she's kind.
And this way, too, you are victorious found;
She flatters with the same success she frowned.
While to yourself severe, to others kind,
With power unbounded, and a will confined,
Of this vast empire you possess the care,

The softer part falls to the people's share.
Safety, and equal government, are things
Which subjects make as happy as their kings.

Faith, law, and piety, (that banished train!)
Justice and truth, with you return again.
The city's trade, and country's easy life,
Once more shall flourish without fraud or strife.
Your reign no less assures the ploughman's peace,
Than the warm sun advances his increase;
And does the shepherds as securely keep
>From all their fears, as they preserve their sheep.

But, above all, the Muse-inspired train
Triumph, and raise their drooping heads again!
Kind Heaven at once has, in your person, sent
Their sacred judge, their guard, and argument.






Of the Last Verses in the Book

When we for age could neither read nor write,
The subject made us able to indite.
The soul, with nobler resolutions deckt,
The body stooping, does herself erect:
No mortal parts are requisite to raise
Her, that unbodied can her Maker praise.
The seas are quiet, when the winds give o'er,
So calm are we, when passions are no more:
For then we know how vain it was to boast
Of fleeting things, so certain to be lost.
Clouds of affection from our younger eyes
Conceal that emptiness, which age descries.
The soul's dark cottage, batter'd and decay'd,
Lets in new light through chinks that time has made;
Stronger by weakness, wiser men become
As they draw near to their eternal home:
Leaving the old, both worlds at once they view,
That stand upon the threshold of the new.


 

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Jueves, 10 de Diciembre de 2015 07:33. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica




Лингвистика

sábado, 25 de octubre de 2014

Лингвистика


También en la lejana Macedonia soy una referencia en LINGÜÍSTICA—en el artículo de su Wikipedia:

Лингвистика

Од Википедија — слободната енциклопедија


Estas son las referencias del artículo; con referencias en alfabeto latino y con enlaces externos, incluida mi bibliografía, en cirílico.

Литература

  • Akmajian, Adrian; Demers, Richard; Farmer, Ann; Harnish, Robert (2010). „Linguistics: An Introduction to Language and Communication“. Cambridge, MA: The MIT Press. ISBN 0-262-51370-6. 
  • Pinker, Steven (1994). „The Language Instinct“. William Morrow and Company. ISBN 9780140175295. 
  • Derrida, Jacques (1967). „Of Grammatology“. The Johns Hopkins University Press. ISBN 0801858305.

Надворешни врски



Hombre, ya puestos, podrían enlazarme en el Massachusetts Institute of Technology, o en Harvard, además de en la Wikipedia macedónica, pero a nadie le amarga un dulce.

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Domingo, 13 de Diciembre de 2015 11:40. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Pre-Adamites

 

jueves, 23 de octubre de 2014

Pre-Adamites

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Domingo, 13 de Diciembre de 2015 10:39. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Evolución






Ben Jonson Bibliography

 

viernes, 24 de octubre de 2014

Ben Jonson Bibliography

 

Ben Jonson (1572-1637)

     (English dramatist and poet, b. Westminster, orphaned son of a Protestant minister, st. Westminster School, left Cambridge without a degree, apprenticed as bricklayer to father-in-law; volonteer in Flanders army 1592, killed enemy in single combat, actor in London c. 1594, imprisoned for manslaughter, converted to Catholicism for some time, married 1594, children died; returned to Anglicanism 1606; pensioned by the King 1616; honorary MA Oxford 1619; poet for aristocratic patrons, apologist of Stuart royalty; neoclassical theorist and literary authority, overweight and hard drinker)
Works
1590s
Jonson, Ben. Every Man in his Humour. Comedy. Acted 1596, rev. version acted at Blackfriars, 1598.
_____. Every Man In His Humour. London: Walter Burre, 1601.
_____. Every Man in His Humour. In Jonson, Works. 1616.
_____. Every Man in his Humour. Ed. Herford and Simpson.
_____. Every Man in His Humour. (Revels series). Ed. Robert S. Miola.
_____. The Case Is Altered. Comedy. 1598. (Vs Munday, "Don Antonio Ballendino").
_____. Prologue to Every Man in his Humour. Folio ed., 1616.
_____. ? The Scottes Tragedy. Drama. 1599. (Lost).
Jonson, Ben, Thomas Dekker, and Henry Chettle. Robert the Second, King of Scottes. Drama.   c. 1599. (Lost).
Chettle, Henry, Henry Porter and Ben Jonson. Hot Anger soon Cold. Drama. August 1598. Not printed.
Nashe, Thomas, Ben Jonson, et al. The Isle of Dogs. Drama. 1597. (Lost).
1600s
Jonson, Ben. Cynthia's Revels. Drama. Acted at Whitehall and Blackfriars, 1600.
_____. Cynthia's Revels. Ed. C. H. Herford and Percy Simpson. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1932.
_____. Every Man Out of His Humour. Comedy. Staged Globe theatre, 1600.
_____. Every Man Out of His Humour. Online at Project Gutenberg.*
2012
_____. Prologue to Every Man Out of His Humour. 1600. Select. in Literary Criticism from Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 537-38.
_____. "Queen and Huntress."  Poem. 1600. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1413-14.
_____. "Slow, Slow, Fresh Fount." Poem. 1600.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1413.*
_____. The Poetaster. Comedy. Acted at Blackfriars, 1601.
_____. Poetaster. Ed Tom Cain. Manchester: Manchester UP, 1995. 1996.
_____. Rev. version of Jeronymo for Henslowe. 1601.
_____. Richard Crook-Back. Tragedy. 1602. (Lost).
_____. Sejanus His Fall. Tragedy (in collaboration with anon. author). Produced by the King's Men, Globe theatre, 1603. Rev. version by Ben Jonson 1605. (Political play, in support of the  Earl of Essex).
_____. "To the Readers of Sejanus." 1605. In Criticism from Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 538-49.*
_____. "To the Readers." In Sejanus, His Fall. 1605. In Writing and the English Renaissance. Ed. William Zunder and Suzanne Trill. Harlow (Essex): Longman, 1996. 265-66.*
_____. Panegyric on the First Meeting of Parliament. c. 1604.
_____. The Masque of Blackness. Acted 1605. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1294-1303.*
_____. Hymenaei. Masque. First performed 1606.
_____. Volpone. Comedy. First performed King's Men, Globe Theatre, 1606. Acted 1606 at Oxford and Cambridge.
_____. Volpone. Quarto, 1607.
_____. Volpone. In Works, 1616.
_____. Volpone. Ed. Jonas Barish. Arlington Heights (IL): AHM, 1958.
_____. Volpone or the Fox /Volpone o el zorro. Bilingual ed. Ed. and trans. A. Sarabia Santander. Barcelona: Bosch, 1980.
_____. Volpone. In Jonson,Volpone and Other Plays. Ed. Lorna Hutson. (Renaissance Dramatists). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1998.
_____. Volpone.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1303-93.*
_____. Volpone, or the Fox. Online at Project Gutenberg.
2012
_____. Volpone. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 673-64.*
_____. Volpone. Ed. and trans. Purificación Ribes. (Letras Universales). Madrid: Cátedra, 2002.
_____. Dedicatory Epistle of Volpone. 1606. In The Personal Note. Ed. H. J. C. Grierson and S. Wason. London: Chatto, 1946. 38-41.
_____. "Dedication to Volpone." In Literary Criticism and Theory. Ed. R. C. Davis and L. Finke. London: Longman, 1989. 234-37.*
_____. The Masque of Whiteness. c. 1607.
_____. Masque of Beauty. 1608.
_____. "Still to Be Neat." Poem. 1609.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1414.*
_____. Britain's Burse. Drama. 1609.
_____. Speeches at Prince Henry's Barriers. 1609.  (Allegorical tournament-entertainment).
_____. Epicoene: Or, The Silent Woman. Comedy. 1609-10.
_____. Epicene. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 775-860.*
_____. The Key Keeper: An Entertainment at Britain's Burse. Masque. 1609. Ed. John Knowles. Forthcoming 1997.
_____. The Entertainment at Britain's Burse. Masque. Written 1609. 1st ed. in Re-Presenting Ben Jonson: Text, Performance, History. Ed. Martin Butler. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1999.
_____. The Masque of Queens. 1609.
Jonson, Ben, John Marston and George Chapman. Eastward Ho! Comedy. 1605.
_____. Eastward Ho! Edited by C. G. Petter.  (The New Mermaids). Benn, 1973.
1610s
_____. Barriers. 1610.
_____. The Alchemist. Comedy. c. 1610.
_____. The Alchemist.  Ed. F. H. Mares. London: Methuen.
_____. The Alchemist. Ed. Peter Bement. London: Routledge, 1987.
_____. The Alchemist. In The Alchemist and Other Plays. Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
_____. The Alchemist. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 861-960.*
_____. Preface to The Alchemist. 1612.
_____. Oberon the Fairy Prince. Masque. 1611.
_____. Catiline His Conspiracy. Tragedy. Pub. 1611.
_____. Love Restored. Masque. 1612.
_____. A Challenge at Tilt. Drama. 1613.
_____. "Induction" to Bartholomew Fair. 1614.
_____. "Ben Jonson on The Tempest (and Titus Andronicus) (1614)." In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3341.*
_____. The Devil is an Ass. Drama. 1616.
_____. Lovers Made Men. Masque. 1617.
_____. Bartholomew Fair. Comedy. 1614. 
_____. Bartholomew Fair. Ed. Maurice Hussey. London: Benn, 1964.
_____. Bartholomew Fair. In English Renaissance Drama: A Norton Anthology. Ed. David Bevington et al. New York and London: Norton, 2002. 961-1066.*
_____. The Devil's an Ass. Comedy. 1616.
_____. Mercury Vindicated from the Alchemists in Court. Masque. 1616.
_____. The Workes of Beniamin Jonson. Imprinted at London: By Will Stansby, 1616.  (Folio; Contains: Comedies, Tragedies, Masques,  Epigrams, and The Forest poems).
_____. "On My First Son." Poem. In Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense. By Thomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson. 8th ed. Boston (MA): Thomson Learning-Heinle & Heinle, 2002. 764.*
_____. From Epigrams. 1616. ("To My Book", "On Something, That Walks Somewhere," "To William Camden," "On My Fist Daughter," "To John Donne," "On Don Surly," "On Giles and Joan," "On My First Son," "On Lucy, Countess of Bedford," "To Lucy, Countess of Bedford, with Mr. Donne's Satires," "Inviting a Friend to Supper," "Epitaph on S.P., a Child of Queen's Elizabeth Chapel.").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.393-99.*
_____. From The Forest. 1616. ("To Penshurst," "Song: To Celia," "To Heaven").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1399-1403.*
_____. "Song: To Celia." In Perrine's Literature: Structure, Sound, and Sense. By Thomas R. Arp and Greg Johnson. 8th ed. Boston (MA): Thomson Learning-Heinle & Heinle, 2002. 1064-65.*
_____. Pleasure Reconciled to Virtue. Masque. 1618.
_____. Conversations with Drummond. 1619.
_____, ed. History of the World. By Sir Walter Ralegh. 1614.
Jonson, Ben, and Inigo Jones. Oberon. Masque. 1611.
1620s
Jonson, Ben. Conversations with William Drummond of Hawthornden. In Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors) 595-612.
_____. The Gipsies Metamorphosed. Masque. 1621.
_____. Time Vindicated. 1623.
_____. "To the Reader." Prefatory poem to the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays. 1623. Facsimile. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3346.*
_____. "To the Memory of my Beloved, The Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and What He Hath Left Us." In Mr. William Shakespeares  Comedies, Histories, & Tragedies. (First Folio). London,1623.
_____. "To the memory of my beloued, the avthor Mr. William Shakespeare: And what he hat left vs." Prefatory poem to the First Folio of Shakespeare's plays. 1623. Facsimile. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3351-52.*
_____. "To the memory of my beloved, the author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and what he hath left us." In The Works of Ben Jonson, vol. 3. London: Chatto & Windus, 1910. 287-9. Luminarium
2013
_____. "To the Memory of My Beloved, the Author." 1623. In Shakespeare Criticism: A Selection 1623-1840. London: Oxford UP, 1946. 3-5.
_____. "To the Memory of my Beloved, The Author, Mr. William Shakespeare, and What He Hath Left Us."  1623. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1414-16.*
_____. Neptune's Triumph for the Return of Albion. Masque. 1624.
_____. The Fortunate Isles. 1625.
_____. The Staple of Newes. Comedy. 1626.
_____. Anti-Masque of Jophiel. 1627.
_____. "To the Immortal Memory and Friendship of that Noble Pair, Sir Lucius Cary and Sir H. Morison." Ode. 1629, pub. 1640-41.  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1.1609-13.*
Heminge, John, Henry Condell, Ben Jonson, et al. "Front Matter from the First Folio of Shakespeare's Plays (1623)." Facsimiles. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3345-57.*
1630s
Jonson, Ben. The New Inn. Comedy. 1630. Printed in 1631 octavo; omitted from the 1640 folio. Included in 1692 folio.
_____. "Ode (To Himself)." The Oxford Book of Seventeenth Century Verse. Ed. H. J. C. Grierson and G. Bullough. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1934. 179-180.
_____. "Ode (To Himself)." Luminarium.*
2011
_____. "Expostulation with Inigo Jones." 1631.
_____. Love's Triumph Through Callipolis. Masque. Acted 1631..
_____. Chloridia. Masque. 1631.
_____. "Ode to Himself." 1631, 1640-41. 
_____. "An Ode to Himself." In The Songs and Poems of Ben Jonson. London: Philip Allan & Co., 1924. 59-60.
_____. "Ode to Himself." In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1416-18.*
_____. "An Ode to Himself." Luminarium
2012
_____. The Magnetic Lady. Comedy. 1632.
_____. Tale of a Tub. Drama. 1633.
_____. "Induction" to The Magnetic Lady. 1635.
_____. The Sad Shepherd. Pastoral drama. c. 1637.
_____. The Sad Shepherd: Or, A Tale of Robin Hood. Online facsimile at The Internet Archive
2012
_____. The Second Book of the English Grammar. c. 1637.
Fletcher, John, George Chapman, Ben Jonson and Philip Massinger (?). Rollo: or the Bloody Brother. Oxford, 1638.
1640s
Jonson, Ben. The English Grammar. Ed. James Howell. 1640.
_____. The English Grammar. In Jonson, Works. 1640.
_____. English Grammar. Rev. ed. in Jonson's 1692 Folio.
_____. The Underwood. In Jonson, (Works, Second folio). 1640.
_____. From Underwood. 1640-41. (From "A Celebration of Charis in Ten Lyric Pieces," "A Sonnet, to the Noble Lady, the Lady Mary Wroth," "My Picture Left in Scotland,").  In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1403-9.*
_____. An Execration against Vulcan. 1640.
_____. Works. 2nd ed. 1640.
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Criticism. 1st ed. in Workes. Vol. 2. 1640.
_____. Timber. In 1692 folio.
_____. Discoveries. Ed. Maurice Castelain. Paris, 1906.
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Selection. In The Great Critics. Ed. J. H. Smith and E. W. Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 212-21.*
_____. Discoveries. Ed. G. B. Harrison. (Bodley Head Quartos).
_____. Timber: Or, Discoveries. Ed. Ralph S. Walker. London: Greenwood Press, 1976.
_____. Timber or discoveries. In Jonson, The Complete Poems. Ed. G. Parfitt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1980.
_____. Timber, or, Discoveries. In Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors) 521-94.*
_____. From Timber, or Discoveries. 1640-41. (Style). In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. 7th ed. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.1616-18.*
_____. "De Shakespeare Nostrati." 1641. In Shakespeare Criticism: A Selection 1623-1840. London: Oxford UP, 1946. 6.
_____. "Ben Jonson on Shakespeare (1623-37)." From Timber. In The Norton Shakespeare. Ed. Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1997. 3360-61.*
_____, trans. The Art of Poetry. By Horace. In Works. Ed. 1640.
_____, trans. The Art of Poetry. By Horace. In The Great Critics. Ed. James Harry Smith and Edd Winfield Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 88-105.*
Other works
Jonson, Ben.The Masque of Augurs.
_____. Commentary on the Poetics. (Lost).
_____. Journey into Scotland. (Lost).
_____. May Lord. Drama. (Lost).
_____. Life of Henry V. (Unfinished and lost).
_____. Rape of Proserpine. Poem. (Lost).
_____. Epitaph on the Countess of Pembroke.
Jonson, Ben, and Inigo Jones. Love's Triumph Through Callipolis. Masque.
Collected works
Jonson, Ben. Works. 1616. (Folio).
_____. Works. 2nd ed. 1640.
_____. (Works). 1692 (Folio).
_____. (Works of Ben Jonson). Octavo, 6 vols. Illustrated. Jacob Tonson, 1716.
_____. Jonson Anthology (1617-1637). Ed. E. Arber. (British Anthologies 5). Frowde, 1899.
_____. The Works of Ben Jonson. Ed. C. H. Herford, Percy Simpson, and Evelyn Simpson. 11 vols. Oxford: Clarendon, 1925-52. 1971.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. W. B. Hunter, Jr. New York: New York UP, 1963.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. William B. Hunter, Jr. Garden City (NY): Doubleday-Anchor, 1963.
_____. The Complete Poetry of Ben Jonson. Ed. William B. Hunter, Jr. New York: Norton, 1978.
_____. Ben Jonson. Ed. Thom Gunn. (Poet to Poet). Harmondsworth: Penguin.
_____. Ben Jonson and the Cavalier Poets. Ed. Hugh Maclean. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 1975.
_____. Ben Jonson's Plays and Masques. Ed. Robert M. Adams. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 1979.
_____. The Complete Poems. Ed. George Parfitt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1975. 1980.
_____. Three Comedies (Volpone, The Alchemist, Bartholomew Fair). Harmondsworth: Penguin.*
_____. Five Plays.  Ed. G. A. Wilkes. Oxford: Oxford UP.
_____. Ben Jonson (The Oxford Authors). Ed. Ian Donaldson. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1985.*
_____. "On My First Son." "My Picture left in Scotland." "To Penshurst." From Volpone. In The Arnold Anthology of British and Irish Literature in English. Ed. Robert Clark and Thomas Healy. London: Hodder Headline-Arnold, 1997. 303-15.*
_____. The Selected Plays of Ben Jonson. Ed. Johanna Procter. (Plays By Renaissance and Restoration Dramatists). 1989.
_____. The Alchemist and Other Plays. Ed. Gordon Campbell. Oxford: Oxford UP, 1995.
_____. Volpone and Other Plays. Ed. Lorna Hutson. (Renaissance Dramatists). Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1998.
_____. Ben Jonson's Plays and Masques. Ed. Richard Harp. 2nd ed. (Norton Critical Edition). New York: Norton, 2001.
_____. (Ben Jonson's masques, ed. Stephen Orgel, for the Yale ed. of Ben Jonson's works).
Spencer, T. J. B., and S. Wells, eds. A Book of Masques. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1967. Rpt. 1980. (Jonson, Daniel, Campion, Beaumont, W. Browne, Davenant).
On Ben Jonson
Biography
Boehrer, Bruce Thomas. "Renaissance Overeating: The Sad Case of Ben Jonson." PMLA 105 (1990): 1071-82.*
Gifford. Life of Ben Jonson. 19th c.
Hazlitt, William. "Benjamin Jonson." In The Lives of the British Poets. London: Nathaniel Cooke, 1854. 1.206-19.*
Riggs, David. Ben Jonson: A Life. Cambridge (MA): Harvard University Press, 1989.
Criticism
Bamborough, J. B. Ben Jonson. New York: Humanities Press, 1970.
Barish, Jonas A. Ben Jonson and the Language of Prose Comedy. Cambridge (MA): Harvard UP, 1960.
_____. From "Jonson and the Loathèd Stage." From A Celebration of Ben Jonson. Ed. William Blisset, Julian Patrick and R. W. Van Fossen. 1973. 32-46. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1508.*
_____, ed. Jonson: Volpone. (Casebooks series). Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1972.
_____, ed. Ben Jonson: A Collection of Critical Essays. Englewood Cliffs (NJ): Prentice-Hall, 1963.*
Barton, Anne. Ben Jonson, Dramatist. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1984.
Bawcutt. N. W. "New Jonson Documents." The Review of English Studies 47.185 (1996): 50-52.*
Beaurline, L. Ben Jonson and Elizabethan Comedy: Essays in Dramatic Rhetoric. San Marino (CA): Huntington Library, 1978.
Bentley, Gerald E. Shakespeare and Jonson: Their Reputations in the Seventeenth Century Compared. Chicago, 1945.
Blisset, William, Julian Patrick and R. W. Van Fossen, eds. A Celebration of Ben Jonson. 1973.
Brady, Jennifer. . (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Burrow, Colin. "Combative Criticism: Jonson, Milton, and Classical Literary Criticism in England." In The Renaissance. Ed. Glyn P. Norton. Vol. 3 of The Cambridge History of Literary Criticism. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1999. 2001. 487-99.*
Butler, Martin, ed. Re-Presenting Ben Jonson: Text, Performance, History. (Early Modern Literature in History series). Houndmills: Macmillan, 1999..
Carvalho Homem, Rui. "Entre o juiz e o louco: persusos da comédia de Ben Jonson de Volpone a Bartholomew Faiyre. MA diss. U de lisboa, 1986.
_____. "Retórica do Riso: Comédia, Sátira, e um dia na Feira com Ben Jonson." Revista da Faculdade de Letras- Lnguas e Literaturas, in Honorem Prof. Oscar Lopes. 2nd ser. 12 (Porto, 1995): 301-47.
_____. "'A More Familiar Straine': Puppetry and Burlesque, or, Translation as Debasement in Ben Jonson's Bartholomew Fair." In SEDERI VII. Ed. S. González Fernández-Corugedo et al. Coruña: SEDERI, 1996. 179-86.*
Cave, Richard Allen. Ben Jonson. (English Dramatists). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Clare, Janet. "Jonson's 'Comical Satires' and the Art of Courtly Compliment." Refashioning Ben Jonson: Gender, Politics and the Jonsonian Canon. Ed. Julie Sanders. London: Macmillan, 1998. 28-44.
Coles, Chris. How to Study a Renaissance Play: Marlowe, Jonson, Webster. (How to Study series). Houndmills: Macmillan, 1988.
Coren, Pamela. "In the Person of Womankind: Female Persona Poems by Campion, Donne, Jonson." Studies in Philology (Chapel Hill) 98.2 (Spring 2001): 225-51.
2004-03-28
Coronato, Rocco. "Carnival Vindicated to Himself? Reappraising Bakhtinized Ben Jonson." Connotations 6.2 (1996/97): 180-203.*
Craig, D. H., ed. Ben Jonson: The Critical Heritage. London: Routledge, 1991.
Dietz, Bernd. "Los Epigramas de Ben Jonson." In Estudios literarios ingleses: Renacimiento y barroco. Ed. Susana Onega. Madrid: Cátedra, 1986. 343-62.*
Dollimore, Jonathan. "8. Sejanus (1603): History and Realpolitik." In Dollimore, Radical Tragedy. 3rd ed. Houndmills: Palgrave, 2004. 134-38.*
Donaldson, Ian. The World Upside Down: Comedy from Jonson to Fielding. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1970.
_____. Jonson's Magic Houses: Essays in Interpretation. Oxford: Clarendon Press, 1997.
Dryden, John. Of Dramatic Poesy: An Essay. 1668.
_____. Essay of Dramatic Poesy. Ed. Thomas Arnold, rev. W. T. Arnold. Oxford, 1903.*
_____. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In The Great Critics. Ed. J. H. Smith and E. W. Parks. New York: Norton, 1932. 255-310.*
_____. An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In Literary Criticism: From Plato to Dryden. Ed. Gilbert. 601-58.*
_____. Of Dramatic Poesie. In Of Dramatic Poesie and Other Critical Essays. Ed. George Watson. 2 vols. London, 1962.
_____. Of Dramatic Poesie. Ed. James T. Boulton. Oxford, 1964.
_____. Of Dramatic Poesy: An Essay. In Dryden, Selected Criticism 17-76.*
_____ An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. In Literary Criticism and Theory. Ed. R. C. Davis and L. Finke. London: Longman, 1989. 249-89.*
_____. From An Essay of Dramatic Poesy. InThe Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1.2114-18.*
Dutton, Richard. Ben Jonson: To the First Folio. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1983.
_____. Ben Jonson: Authority: Criticism. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1996.
Eliot, T. S. "Ben Jonson." 1919. In Eliot, Selected Essays. 3rd. ed. London: Faber, 1951. 147-60.
_____. "Ben Jonson." 1919. In The Sacred Wood. 1920. 104-22.
_____. "Ben Jonson." In Eliot, El bosque sagrado: Edición bilingüe. San Lorenzo de El Escorial (Madrid): Langre, 2004. 325-60.*
_____. "Ben Jonson." In The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1495-98.*
Enright, D. J. From "Poetic Satire and Satire in Verse: A Consideration of Jonson and Massinger." Scrutiny (Winter 1951-52): 211-23. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1542-44.*
Evans, Robert C. Ben Jonson and the Poetics of Patronage. Lewisburg (PA): Bucknell UP, 1989.
_____. "Ben Johnson Reads Daphnis and Chloe." English Language Notes. 27.4 (1990): 28-32.
Fernández López, J. "Horacio y Ben Jonson: Poetaster." In Bimilenario de Horacio. Ed. Rosario Cortés Tovar and José Carlos Fernández Corte. Salamanca: Ediciones Universidad de Salamanca, 1994. 36-76.*
Ferry, Anne. All in War with Time: Love Poetry of Shakespeare, Donne, Jonson, Marvell. 1975.
Fowler, Alastair. "The Silva Tradition in Jonson's The Forrest." In Poetic Traditions of the English Renaissance. Ed. Maynard Mack and George de Forest Lord. New Haven: Yale UP, 1982. 163-80.
Freehafer, John. "Leonard Digges, Ben Jonson, and the Beginning." Shakespeare Quarterly 21 (1970): 63-75.
_____. "Leonard Digges, Ben Jonson, and the Beginning." In Shakespeare and the Literary Tradition. Ed. Stephen Orgel and Sean Keilen. New York and London: Garland, 1999. 239-42.*
García Landa, José Angel. "Jonson, Ben." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 2 Oct. 2012.*
2012
_____. "Every Man in His Humour / Every Man Out of His Humour." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 17 Oct. 2012.*
2012
_____. "The Plot of Volpone." From The Oxford Companion to English Literature. García Landa, José Ángel. "." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 20 Nov. 2012.*
2012
García Martínez, Isabel. "Ben Jonson y Molière. Análisis comparativo de su itinerario vital y creador." XIV Congreso de AEDEAN. Bilbao: Servicio Editorial de la Universidad del País Vasco, 1992. 285-94.
Goldberg, Jonathan. James I and the Politics of Literature: Jonson, Shakespeare, Donne and Their Contemporaries. Baltimore and London, 1983.
Gómez Lara, Manuel. "Emblems of Darkness: Othello 1604 and the Masque of Blackness 1605." In SEDERI VII. Ed. S. González Fernández-Corugedo et al. Coruña: SEDERI, 1996. 217-24.*
Gordon, D. J. "Hymenaei: Ben Jonson's Masque of Union." In The Renaissance Imagination. Ed. Stephen Orgel.  Berkeley and London, 1975. (Masque, emblems, iconography).
Grant, Patrick. Literature and the Discovery of Method in the English Renaissance. Athens: U of Georgia P, 1985. (More: Richard III; Jonson: Bartholomew Fair; Donne: Anniversaries; Browne: Religio Medici; Law: Spirit of Love ; on Digby's Annotations, 102-88).
Greene, Thomas M. "Ben Jonson and the Centered Self." SEL 10 (1970): 325-48.
Harp, Richard, and Stanley Stewart, eds. The Cambridge Companion to Ben Jonson. (Cambridge Companions). Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 2000.
Haynes, Jonathan. From "Festivity and the Dramatic Economy of Jonson's Bartholomew Fair." ELH (Winter 1984): 645-57. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1520-24.*
_____. The Social Relations of Jonson's Theatre. 1992.
Helgerson, Richard. Self-Crowned Laureates: Spenser, Jonson, Milton, and the Literary System. Berkeley: U of California P, 1983.
_____. "Ben Jonson." In The Cambridge Companion to English Poetry, Donne to Marvell. Ed. Thomas N. Corns. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1993. 148-70.*
Holdsworth, R. V., ed. Jonson: Every Man in His Humour and The Alchemist. (Casebooks series). Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1979.
Hollander, John. Vision and Resonance: Two Senses of Poetic Form.  New York: Oxford UP, 1975.
_____. "Ben Jonson and the Modality of Verse." From Hollander, Vision and Resonance: Two Senses of Poetic Form. 1975. 169-82. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1508-12.*
Ioppolo, Grace. "Author Hissed off Stage." Revs. on Jonson. TLS 31 Jan. 1997: 23.*
Johnson, A. W. Ben Jonson: Poetry and Architecture. c. 1996.
Jonson: Volpone. (Brodie's Notes). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Jonson: Volpone. (Macmillan Master Guides). Houndmills: Macmillan.
Judkins, David C. The Nondramatic Works of Ben Jonson: A Reference Guide. Boston: Hall, 1982.
Kamholtz, Jonathan. . (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Kernan, Alvin B., ed. Two Renaissance Mythmakers: Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977.
Knights, L. C. Drama and Society in the Age of Jonson. Harmondsworth: Penguin.
_____. "Ben Jonson, Dramatist." In The Age of Shakespeare. Vol. 2 of The New Pelican Guide to English Literature. Ed. Boris Ford. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1982. Rev. 1993. 404-19.*
Knowles, J. "Cecil's Shopping Centre: The Rediscovery of a Ben Jonson Masque in Praise of Trade." TLS 7 Feb. 1997: 14-15.*
Kolbrener, William. "Man to Man: Self-Fashioning in Jonson's To William Pembroke."Texas Studies in Literature and Language 39 (1997): 284-296.*
Lanier, Douglas. 'Better Markes': Ben Jonson and the Institution of Authorship. Forthcoming 1998.
Lee, Jonsook. Ben Jonson's Poesis: A Literary Dialectic of Ideal and History. Charlottesville: UP of Virginia, 1989.
Lemley, John. "Masks and Self-Portraits in Jonson's Later Poetry." ELH 44 (1977): 248-66.
Loewenstein, Joseph. Responsive Readings: Versions of Echo in Pastoral, Epic, and the Jonsonian Masque. New Haven and London: Yale UP, 1984.
_____. "The Jonsonian Corpulence, or the Poet as Mouthpiece." ELH 53 (1986): 491-518.
Lyon, John. "Jonson and Carew on Donne: Censure into Praise." Rice University Studies in English Literature 37.1 (Winter 1997): 97-119.*
MacLean, Hugh. "Ben Jonson's Poems: Notes on the Ordered Society." In Essays in English Literature from the Renaissance to the Victorian Age: Presented to A. S. P. Woodhouse. Ed. M. MacLure and F. W. Watt. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1964. 43-68.*
Marotti, Arthur F. "All About Jonson's Poetry." ELH 39 (1972): 208-37.
Maus, Katharine Eisaman. Ben Jonson and the Roman Frame of Mind. 1985.
Marcus, Leah S. The Politics of Mirth: Jonson, Herrick, Milton, Marvell and the Defense of Old Holiday Pastimes. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1986.
McCanles, Michael. Jonsonian Discriminations: The Humanist Poet and the Praise of True Nobility. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1992.
McClung, William A. The Country House in English Renaissance Poetry. Berkeley: U of California P, 1977.
McDonald, Russ. Shakespeare and Jonson: Jonson and Shakespeare. Hemel Hempstead: Harvester Wheatsheaf, 1988.
Miles, Rosalind. Ben Jonson: His Craft and Art. London: Routledge, 1990.
Miner, Earl. The Cavalier Mode from Jonson to Cotton. Princeton (NJ): Princeton UP, 1971.
Mora, María José, and Rafael Portillo. "'Bless Thee, Jonson, Bless Thee! Thou Art Translated': Versiones españolas de Volpone, 1929-1994." Proceedings of the XIXth International Conference of AEDEAN. Ed. Javier Pérez Guerra et al. Vigo: Departamento de Filoloxía Inglesa e Alemana da Universidade de Vigo, 1996. 419-24.*
Newton, Richard C. "'Ben / Jonson': The Poet in the Poems." In Two Renaissance Mythmakers: Christopher Marlowe and Ben Jonson. ed. Alvin B. Kernan. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins UP, 1977. 165-95.
_____. "'Ben./Jonson": The Poet in the Poems." Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1512-20.*
_____. "Jonson and the (Re-)Invention of the Book." In Classic and Cavalier: Essays on Jonson and the Sons of Ben. Ed. Claude J. Summers and Ted-Larry Pebworth. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1982. 31-55.
Nichols, J. G. The Poetry of Ben Jonson. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1969.
Orgel, Stephen. The Jonsonian Masque. Cambridge (MA): Harvard UP, 1965.
_____. "Jonson and the Amazons." In Soliciting Interpretation: Literary Theory and Seventeenth-Century English Poetry. Ed. Elizabeth D. Harvey and Katherine E. Maus. Chicago: U of Chicago P, 1990. 119-40.*
Orgel, Stephen, and Roy Strong. Inigo Jones: The Theatre of the Stuart Court. 2 vols. Berkeley: Sotheby Parke Bennet; London: U of California P, 1973.
Osselton, N. E. "Ben Jonson's Status as a Grammarian." Dutch Quarterly Review of Anglo-American Letters 12 (1982): 205-12.
Parfitt, George. Ben Jonson: Public Poet and Private Man. New York: Barnes and Noble, 1977.   
Patterson, Annabel. "Lyric and Society in Jonson's Under-wood." In Lyric Poetry: Beyond New Criticism. Ed. Charviva Hosek and Patricia Parker. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1985. 148-63.
_____. "Jonson, Marvell, and Miscellaneity?" In Poems in Their Place. Ed. Neil Fraistat. Chapel Hill: U of North Carolina P, 1986. 95-118.
Pérez Fernández, José María. "Stoicism and Plain Style in Ben Jonson: An Analysis of Some of His Verse Epistles." Atlantis 18 (June-Dec.1996 [issued 1998]): 337-47.*
Peterson, Richard S. Imitation and Praise in the Poems of Ben Jonson. New Haven: Yale UP, 1981.
Pigman, G. W., III. "Suppressed Grief in Jonson's Funeral Poetry." English Literary Renaissance 13 (1983): 203-20.
Post, Jonathan F. S. "Ben Jonson and the Art of Inclusion." In Post, English Lyric Poetry: The Early Seventeenth Century. London: Routledge, 1999. 2002. 23-53.*
Purkiss, Diane. The Witch in History: Early Modern and Twentieth-Century Representations. London: Routledge, 1996. (Masque of Queens).
Riddell, James A. "The Arrangement of Ben Jonson's Epigrammes." SEL 27 (1987): 53-70.
Rivers, Isabel. The Poetry of Conservatism 1600-1745: A Study of Poets and Public Affairs from Jonson to Pope. Cambridge, 1973. (Marvell, 101-25).
Sackton, A. H. Rhetoric as Dramatic Language in Ben Jonson. New York: Octagon Books, 1967.
Salomé Machado, María. "Shakespeare's The Taming of the Shrew and Jonson's Epicoene: The Women in the Stocks." In SEDERI 9 (1998). Ed. Jesús Cora Alonso et al. Alcalá de Henares: SEDERI / U de Alcalá, 1999. 257-63.*
Sanders, Julie. Ben Jonson's Theatrical Republics. Houndmills: Macmillan, 1998.
Sanders, Julie, Kate Chedgzoy and Susan Wiseman, eds. Refashioning Ben Jonson: Gender, Politics, and the Jonsonian Canon. Basingstoke: Macmillan, 1997.
Schelling, F. E. "Ben Jonson and the Classical School." PMLA 13 (1898): 221-49. Rpt. in Schelling, Shakespeare and Demi-Science. Philadelphia, 1927.
Scodel, Joshua. The English Poetic Epitaph: Commemoration and Conflict from Jonson to Wordsworth. Ithaca: Cornell UP, 1991.
Silver, Victoria. "Totem and Taboo in the Tribe of Ben: the Duplicity of Gender and Jonson's Satires." ELH 62.4 (Winter 1995): 729-58.*
Sinfield, Alan. "Poetaster, The Author, and the Perils of Cultural Production." In Sinfield, Shakespeare, Authority, Sexuality: Unfinished Business in Cultural Materialism. London and New York: Routledge, 2006. 40-52.* (Jonson).
Slights, William W. E. Ben Jonson and the Art of Secrecy. Toronto: U of Toronto P, 1996.
Spingarn, J. E. "The Source of Jonson's Discoveries." Modern Philology 2 (1903): 1-10.
Spurr, Barry. "Varieties of Poetic Style." In Spurr, Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia, 1997. 31-44.* (Marvell, "The Mower to the Glow-Worms"; Johnson, "The Vanity of Human Wishes", Jonson, "Slow, slow, fresh fount"; Tony Harrison, "Bookends").
_____. "The Early Seventeenth Century—The Pilgrimage to the Kingdom of Man." In Spurr, Studying Poetry. Melbourne: Macmillan Education Australia, 1997. 90-133.* (Marvell, Milton, Donne, "The Flea, "A Valediction, Forbidding Mourning." "O my Black Soul"; "Batter My heart"; Herbert, "Jordan I", "Jordan II, "Redemption", "Vertue" "The Pulley"; Crashaw, "On the Wounds of Our Crucified Lord"; Jonson "Epitaph on S. P."; Herrick, "Delight in Disorder"; Milton, Paradise Lost).
Summers, Claude J., and Ted-Larry Pebworth, eds. Classic and Cavalier: Essays on Jonson and the Sons of Ben. Pittsburgh: U of Pittsburgh P, 1982.
Summers, Joseph H. The Heirs of Donne and Jonson. London: Chatto and Windus, 1970.
Swinburne, Algernon Charles. A Study of Ben Jonson. London: Chatto & Windus.
Symonds, John Addington. Ben Jonson. Longmans, 1888.
Tillotson, Geoffrey. "Othello and The Alchemist at Oxford in 1610." In Tillotson, Essays in Criticism and Research. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1942. 41-48.*
Trimpi, Wesley. Ben Jonson's Poems: A Study in the Plain Style. Stanford (CA): Stanford UP, 1962.
_____. "Jonson and the Neo-Latin Authorities for the Plain Style." PMLA 77 (1962).
Trussler, Simon. "5. The Era of the Outdoor Playhouses 1572-1603." In Trussler, The Cambridge Illustrated History of British Theatre. Cambridge: Cambridge UP, 1994. pbk 2000. 70-89.* (The decline of provincial playing. London's 'theatre districts'. The first prominent playhouses. Techniques of staging. Organization and development of the major companies. Actors, repertoires, 'parts' and 'lines'. The university wits, and the triumph of blank verse. Comedies, histories, tragedies—and jigs. Playwriting as a profession: Shakespeare, Heywood, Jonson. Return of the children, and the 'war of the theatres'. Theatre at court. Death of a consummate actress. Reconstructing the theatres).
van den Berg, Sara. The Action of Ben Jonson's Poetry. Newark: U of Delaware P, 1987.
Vélez Núñez, Rafael. "Ben Jonson's 'Decorous Antimasques'." Actas del XXI Congreso AEDEAN. Ed. F. Toda et al. Sevilla: U de Sevilla, 1999. 337-40.*
_____. "The Poetical Mind in Ben Jonson's Masques." In SEDERI 9 (1998). Ed. Jesús Cora Alonso et al. Alcalá de Henares: SEDERI / U de Alcalá, 1999. 209-14.*
_____. "Ben Jonson y el género inexistente." In Proceedings of the 22nd International Conference of AEDEAN (Asociación Española de Estudios Anglonorteamericanos). Lleida, 17-19 December 1998. Ed. Pere Gallardo and Enric Llurda. Lleida: Edicions de la Universitat de Lleida, 2000. 421-24.*
Venuti, Lawrence. "Why Jonson Wrote Not of Love." Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies 12 (1982): 195-220.
Viau, Robert O. "Conservatism Expressed Radically: The Zeal of Jonson's and Swift's Attacks on Zeal." Journal of General Education 34 (1982): 69-83.
Wayne, Don E. "Poetry and Power in Ben Jonson's Epigrammes: The Naming of 'Facts' or the Figuring of Social Relations?" Renaissance and Modern Studies 23 (1979): 70-103.
_____. "Jonson's Sidney: Legacy and Legitimation in The Forest." In Sir Philip Sidney's Achievements. Ed. M. J. B. Allen. New York: AMS, 1990. 227-50.
_____. Penshurst: The Semiotics of Place and the Poetics of History. London, 1984; Madison: U of Wisconsin P, 1984.
Wells, Stanley. Shakespeare and Co.: Christopher Marlowe, Thomas Dekker, Ben Jonson, Thomas Middleton, John Fletcher and the Other Players in His Story. London: Penguin, 2007.
West, William N. "Public Knowledge at Private Parties: Vives, Jonson, and the Circulation of the Circle of Knowledge." Pre-Modern Encyclopaedic Texts: Proceedings of the Second COMERS Congress. Ed. Peter Binkley. E. J. Brill,199, 303-13
Williams, Weldon M. "The Influence of Ben Jonson's Catiline upon John Oldham's Satyrs upon the Jesuits." ELH 11 (1944): 38-62.
_____. [On To Penshurst.] In Williams, The Country and the City. New York: Oxford UP, 1973.
Wilson, Edmund. "Morose Ben Jonson." 1948. In Wilson, The Triple Thinkers. London: Lehmann, 1952. 203-20.
_____. "Morose Ben Jonson." From The Triple Thinkers. 1948. 213-32. Rpt. in The Critical Perspective: Volume 3: Elizabethan-Caroline. Ed. Harold Bloom. (The Chelsea House Library of Literary Criticism). New York: Chelsea House, 1986. 1498-1504.*
Wiltenburg, Robert. Ben Jonson and Self-Love: The Subtlest Maze of All. Columbia and London: U of Missouri P, 1990.
Wimsatt, W. K. "English Neo-Classicism: Jonson and Dryden." In Wimsatt and Brooks, Literary Criticism: A Short History. New York: Knopf, 1957. 174-95.*
Winner, Jack D. (On Ben Jonson). SEL 23 (1983).
Womack, Peter. Ben Jonson. Oxford: Blackwell, 1987.
Yachnin, Paul. Stage-Wrights: Shakespeare, Jonson, Middleton and the Making of Theatrical Value. (New Cultural Studies). U of Pennsylvania P, c. 1998.
Zender, Karl F. "The Unveiling of the Goddess in Cynthia's Revels." Journal of English and German Philology 77 (1978): 37-52.
Films
Volpone. Dir. Maurice Tourneur. Script by Jules Romains, based on Ben Jonson's work. Cast: Harry Baur, Louis Jouvet, Fernand Ledoux, Marion Dorian, France: Ile de France Films, 1941.*
Online at YouTube (elise paris)
2012
Volpone. By Ben Jonson. Greenwich Theatre production, dir, Elizabeth Freestone, Cast: Richard Bremmer (Volpone), Mark Hadfield (Mosca), Conrad Westmaas (Nano/Avvocato), Harvey Virdi (Androgyno/Avvocato), Edmund Kinglsey (Castrone/Peregrine/Avvocato), Maxwell Hutcheon (Corbaccio), Tim Steed (Corvino), James Wallace (Sir Politic Would-Be), Aislin McGuckin (Celia), Peter Bankole (Bonario/Corvino's Servant), Brigid Zengeni (Lady Would Be). Prod. Film dir. Chris Cowey. DVD. London: Stage on Screen, 2010.*
Internet resources
"Ben Jonson (1572-1637)." Luminarium.*
2011
Journals
The Ben Jonson Journal. Annual. Vol. 1 (1996).
Ed. Richard Harp and Stanley Stewart.
Department of English , UNLV,
Box 4555069, 4505 Maryland Parkway,
Las Vegas, NV 89154-5069.
E-mail: harplh@nevada.edu
Literature
Carew, Thomas. "To Ben Jonson." Poem. c. 1631, pub. 1640. In The Norton Anthology of English Literature. Ed. M. H. Abrams, Stephen Greenblatt, et al. New York: Norton, 1999. 1659-60.*
Cleveland, John. Elegy on Ben Jonson.
Dekker, Thomas. Satiromastix or the Untrussing of the Humorous Poet. Drama. Acted 1602. (vs. Ben Jonson).
Ionsonus Virbivs: or, The Memorie of Ben: Johnson Revived By The Friends of The Muses. London: Henry Seile, 1638. (Elegies).
Oldham, John. "Upon the Works of Ben Jonson." Ode.
Music
Johnson, Robert. "Have You Seen the Bright Lily Grow." From Ben Jonson, The Devil Is an Ass, 1616. In Songs from the Labyrinth: Music by John Dowland: Performed by Sting and Edin Karamazov. CD. Hamburg: UMG-Deutsche Grammophon, 2006.*
Strauss, Richard. Die schweigsame Frau. Comic opera in three acts. Libretto by Stefan Zweig, based on Ben Jonson's play The Silent Woman. 1935.
_____. Die schweigsame Frau. Hans Hötter. Georgine von Milinkovic, Hermann Prey, Fritz Wunderlich, Hilde Güden, Pierette Alarie, Hetty Plümacher, Josef Knapp, Karl Dönch, Alois Pernerstorfer. Chor der Wiener Staatsoper. Wiener Philharmoniker / Karl Böhm. (Salzburger Festspiele 1959: Festspielhaus 6. August). 2 CDs. (Festspiel Dokumente; rec. ORF).  Hamburg: Deutsche Grammophon, 1994.* (Libretto in German and English).
Video
Sherman, Ted. "Jonson, Herbert, Herrick, Marvell Lecture 1." YouTube (Ted Sherman) 7 May 2013.*
2013
 
A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology
by José Ángel García Landa
(University of Zaragoza, Spain)

Etiquetas: , , ,

Domingo, 13 de Diciembre de 2015 11:15. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Chica voleibol

viernes, 24 de octubre de 2014

Chica voleibol

Chica voleibol

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Domingo, 13 de Diciembre de 2015 11:23. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes








Glorious Light Far Away

sábado, 25 de octubre de 2014

Glorious Light Far Away


Glorious light far away 2

He perdido cientos y cientos de fotos de este verano. Ya me decían que para qué hacía tantas.  Me quedan las miniaturas, y las he subido a Flickr en forma de pantallazo. Alguna la aumento para que dé una triste idea de lo bonitas que eran algunas de las fotos, que ya nadie las verá.  Pero las he visto yo, y tantas cosas he visto que no creeríais, naves ardiendo en la Puerta de Tannhäuser, etc. Todo se perderá, como estas lágrimas. Excepto...
—excepto lo que ya se ha perdido.




—oOo—
 

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Domingo, 13 de Diciembre de 2015 11:37. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes




Costa da Vela desde el Facho

domingo, 26 de octubre de 2014

Costa da Vela desde el Facho

Costa da Vela desde el Facho

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Martes, 15 de Diciembre de 2015 08:12. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes




Vera Lynn (2)

domingo, 26 de octubre de 2014

Vera Lynn (2)

Etiquetas: , ,

Martes, 15 de Diciembre de 2015 08:15. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Músicas mías


El status narrativo en la Trilogía

domingo, 26 de octubre de 2014

El status narrativo en la Trilogía


Un capítulo de mi libro de 1992, "El status narrativo en la Trilogía" (Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva, 3) (Narrative Status in the Trilogy (Samuel Beckett and Reflexive Narrative, 3))

http://papers.ssrn.com/abstract=2507744 

Reference Info: Samuel Beckett y la narración reflexiva (Zaragoza: Prensas Universitarias de Zaragoza, 1992)


To be found now in two of the SSRN e-journals (Date posted: October 10, 2014)


eJournal Classifications
CSN Subject Matter eJournals
    
        
            
LIT Subject Matter eJournals
    
        






—oOo—



También en red en Academia



y en ResearchGate 26 Jul. 2015:

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Martes, 15 de Diciembre de 2015 08:17. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Old World Language Families

domingo, 26 de octubre de 2014

Old World Language Families



Una crítica que se le puede hacer a este mapa es que está orientado al revés, básicamente...  El árbol debería seguir la orientación geográfica.

Y observen la pobre y escuálida rama céltica, en qué ha quedado...

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Domingo, 20 de Diciembre de 2015 20:44. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Semiótica


Memoria parcial 2014

domingo, 26 de octubre de 2014

Memoria parcial 2014

Aún no ha terminado octubre, y ya nos piden a los investigadores la memoria de nuestras actividades del año en curso. Ahora me autodenomino investigador porque así me consideran desde que estoy asociado a un grupo subvencionado—que si no ni eres investigador ni una puta mierda, aunque publiques exactamente lo mismo. En mi caso el grupo trabaja sobre hermenéutica y antropología fenomenológica, siendo mi línea la teoría narrativa.

Que a lo que voy, aquí va mi memoria parcial de este año; ya me dirán que incluyo bastantes cosas irrelevantes, pero ni se imaginan lo que sería la lista si incluyo además de esto mis entradas de blog y demás. Así que hay que podar—podemos, como diría Pablo Iglesias. Y una vez podada queda así la lista de mis afanes:




Memoria de actividades de investigación de José Angel García Landa 2014:
1) Coedición de libro:
Tataru, Ludmila, y José Angel García Landa, eds. СЕМИОСФЕРА НАРРАТОЛОГИИ: ДИАЛОГ ЯЗЫКОВ И КУЛЬТУР / Semiosphere of Narratology: A Dialogue of Languages and Cultures. Balashov: Nikolayev / Balashov Institute, Saratov State University, 2013. (Fechado en 2013, salido en 2014)
2) Ponencia:
José Angel García Landa. "La evolución del dividuo social y de los espacios públicos." Conferencia en el seminario HERAF, Facultad de Filosofía y Letras, Zaragoza, 10 enero 2014.
_____. "La evolución del dividuo social y de los espacios públicos (The Evolution of the Social Dividual and of Public Spaces)." Preprint en Social Science Research Network 12 enero 2014.*
2014 
Ha aparecido también en varias revistas de temáticas de la Social Science Research Network, entre ellas:
Psychological Anthropology eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
2014
Cross-Cultural Studies eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
 2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 12 enero 2014.*
2014
Revisada como capítulo de libro.
3) Capítulo de libro:
José Angel García Landa. "4. El dividuo social: roles, marcos interaccionales y (nuevos) medios." In Individuo y espacio público. Ed. Juan Velázquez.  Berlín: Logos Verlag, 2014. 99-116.*
4) Artículos:
José Angel García Landa "La frase que lanzó mil barcos al mar (The Phrase that Launched a Thousand Ships)." Social Science Research Network 26 April 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 6.10 (13 May 2014).*
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 4.9 (16 May 2014).*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Notas sobre reflexividad y retroprospección en La Fenomenología del Espíritu." Social Science Research Network 9 mayo 2014.*
2014
Aparecido en varias revistas temáticas de la SSRN:
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
2014
Psychological Anthropology eJournal 9 mayo 2014.*
2014
Cognition & Culture… eJournal 22 mayo 2014.*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.16 (20 mayo 2014)
Philosophy of Mind eJournal 26 mayo 2014.*
2014
Continental Philosophy eJournal 26 May 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." Social Science Research Network 6 junio 2014.*
2014
Aparecido en varias revistas temáticas electrónicas de la SSRN:
Conflict Studies: Intra-State Conflict eJournal 23 junio 2014.*
2014
Conflict Studies: Effects of Conflict eJournal 11 junio 2014
2014
Social and Political Conflict eJournal 6 junio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." Academia 4 junio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Miserias de la guerra de Pío Baroja: Una desilusión con el mundo y con España." ResearchGate 4 junio 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Too True to Be Good: Cartografía narrativa." Social Science Research Network 30 abril 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 30 April 2014.*
2014
Applied and Practicing Anthropology eJournal 30 abril 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 6.11 (15 May 2014).*
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 4.9 (16 mayo 2014).*
2014
Philosophy of Languge eJournal (20 mayo 2014).*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Notes on The Order of Discourse." Social Science Research Network 23 mayo 2013.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 23 mayo 2014.*
2014
Political Anthropology eJournal 23 mayo 2014.*
2014
Political Theory: History of Political Thought eJournal 7.19 (27 mayo 2014).*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.17 (27 mayo 2014).*
2014
Continental Philosophy eJournal 7.14 (26 mayo 2014).*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Polibio y el tiempo geológico (Polybius and Geological Time)." Social Science Research Network 2 junio 2014.*
2014
Biological Anthropology eJournal 28 mayo 2014.*
2014
Classics Research Network 28 mayo 2014.
http://www.ssrn.com/link/CRN.html
2014
Ancient Philosophical & Scientific Texts eJournal 28 mayo 2014.*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 3 mayo 2014.*
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 9 Junio 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "El Big Bang antes del Big Bang—en Spencer, Darwin, y Poe (The Big Bang before the Big Bang—in Spencer, Darwin, and Poe)." Social Science Research Network 10 July 2014.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 10 July 2014.*
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 10 July 2014.*
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 10 July 2014.*
2014
García Landa. "The Story behind any Story: The Paris Lecture." Social Science Research Network 31 julio 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
Cognition & Culture (…) eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
 2014
Human Cognition in Evolution & Deveopment eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
Cognition in Mathematics, Science & Technology eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
Cognitive Social Science eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
http://www.ssrn.com/link/Cognition-Arts.html
2014
Philosophy of Science eJournal 2 agosto 2014.*
2014
5) Libros (reaparecidos)
José Angel García Landa. Aspectos de la técnica narrativa en Hard Times de Charles Dickens (Aspects of Narrative Technique in Charles Dickens's Hard Times)). Online at Social Science Research Networks 28 Feb. 2014.*
2014
Aceptado en dos revistas electrónicas temáticas:
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 28 Feb. 2014.*
2014
English & Commonwealth Literature eJournal 28 Feb. 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. Reading 'The Monster': The Interpretation of Authorial Intention in the Criticism of Narrative Fiction. PDF en red en Social Science Research Network 22 marzo 2014.*
2014
Aceptado en las siguientes revistas electrónicas temáticas:
Cognition & Culture … eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
2014
American Literature eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
 2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 22 marzo 2014.*
2014
Acción, Relato, Discurso: Estructura de la ficción narrativa (Action, Story, Discourse: The Structure of Narrative Fiction). Online preprint at Social Science Research Network 14 Aug. 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
2014
Cognitive Linguistics: Cognition, Language, Gesture eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
2014
Rhetorical Theory eJournal 14 Aug. 2014.*
2014
6) Artículos (reaparecidos)
José Angel García Landa.  "Literary Theory: Introduction and Greek Origins." 1989. Online at Social Science Research Network 4 April 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 4 April 2014.*
2014
Political Theory: History of Political Thought eJournal 4 April 2014.*
2014
Ancient Greek & Roman Literature eJournal 4 April 2014.*
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 4 April 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Plato's Poetics." Online PDF at Social Science Research Network 26 March 2014.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 26 March 2014.*
2014
Ancient Philosophical and Scientific Texts eJournal 26 March 2014.*
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 26 March 2014.*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 26 March 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Medieval Criticism: Poetics, Aesthetics and Hermeneutics." Online at Social Science Research Network 30 March 2014.*
2014
Anthropology of Religion eJournal 30 March 2014.*
2014
Linguistic Anthropology eJournal 30 March 2014.*
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 30 March 2014.*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 30 March 2014.*
2014
Philosophy of Religion eJournal 30 March 2014.*
2014
Religious Studies Research Network 30 March 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Notes on Metafiction." Social Science Research Network 16 April 2014.*
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 16 April 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Narrative and Identity." En red en Social Science Research Network 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Human cognition in Evolution & Development eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Cognitive Linguistics: Cognition, Language, Gesture eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Philosophy of Mind eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
Rhetorical Theory eJournal 15 enero 2014.*
2014
José Ángel García Landa. "Illuminations from This Thing of Darkness." The Evolutionary Review 1 (2010): 138-40.*
_____. "Illuminations from This Thing of Darkness." Social Science Research Network 5 feb. 2014.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
2014
Biological Anthropology eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
2014
English and Commonwealth Literature eJournal 5 Feb. 2014.*
2014
Pier, John, y José Ángel García Landa, eds. "Introduction to Theorizing Narrativity." Social Science Research Network 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
Cognition & the Arts eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
Cognition & Culture (…) eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
Literary Theory & Criticism eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
Aesthetics & Philosophy of Art eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
Philosophy of Language eJournal 26 Sept. 2014.*
2014
7) Notas en IBERCAMPUS
José Angel García Landa. "El Gran Viaje en El Último Mohicano." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 3 enero 2014.*
2013
_____. "Los marcos como espacios públicos." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 12 enero 2014.*
2014
_____. "Repair Work in Autobiography." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 26 feb. 2014.*
2014
_____. "The Fleeting Systems Lapse Like Foam." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 23 feb. 2014.*
2014
_____. "El Lobo de Wall Street, aquí." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 1 marzo 2014.*
2014
_____. "Veblen y la teatralidad." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 20 marzo 2014.*
2014
_____. "La estructura pragmática de la narración literaria." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 26 marzo 2014.*
2014
_____. "Narratología evolucionista." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 28 March 2014.*
2014
_____. "Primeros Principios, Resumen y Conclusión." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 12 abril 2014.*
2014
_____. "Marx y la naturaleza humana." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 21 abril 2014.*
2014
_____. "Estromas, marcos, y virtualidad de lo real." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 25 May 2014.*
         2014
_____. "La perspectiva dominante en El arte de la guerra." In García Landa, Vanity Fea 2 mayo 2014.*
2014
_____. "Ignorando la mortalidad." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 31 mayo 2014.*
2014
_____. "Retroprospección del Dasein." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 5 junio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Respetar los derechos de las comunidades autónomas." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 19 junio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Las mentes irreverentes." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 10 julio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Teoría de la desilusión." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 21 julio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Descubrir la desilusión: es una verdad." La Onda Digital 683 (2014). (= "Teoría de la desilusión").
2014
_____. "Interaction as Reality-Maintenance." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 29 julio 2014.*
2014
_____. "The Story behind any Story: The Paris Lecture." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 31 julio 2014.*
2014
_____. "Conversión, Reinterpretación, Topsight y Retroacción." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 3 agosto 2014.*
2014
_____. "Narratividad del fotoblog." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 16 agosto 2014.*
         2014
_____. "El derecho a ofenderse." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 1 Sept. 2014.*
2014
_____. "Glass Prospective: La televisión medieval en el teatro isabelino." Ibercampus 6 Sept. 2014.*
2014
_____. "Las torpezas y falacias de la independencia escocesa." Ibercampus (Vanity Fea) 10 Sept. 2014.*
2014
8) Blogs
Narratología evolucionista / Evolutionary Narratology. Facebook group.
2014
Retrospection: Perspectives on Narrative Theory, Hindsight, Hindsight Bias, and the Dynamics of Narrativity. Blog.
2012
The Story in All Stories: Items on Cosmology, Evolution, (Big) History and Representation. Blog at Storify.*
2012
El Gran Teatro del Mundo y el pequeño teatro de la mente
2014
—además de las secciones de diversos blogs misceláneos y personales, por ej.:
Narratología (Vanity Fea)
2014
9) Bibliografías
José Angel García Landa. A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology, 19ª ed. (2014)
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Experimental Fiction." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Dante Simer) 10 enero 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Realism." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (marcoslopes) 10 enero 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Intertextuality – General." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (horagabomilo) 26 enero 2014.*
201
José Angel García Landa. "Spanish literary history." From A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. Online at Scribd (241074) 21 Feb. 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Julia Kristeva." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism, and Philology. En red en Scribd (stgerr) 23 feb. 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "F. R. Leavis." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Bing-e-Qaiser) 1 marzo 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "English Dictionaries." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Koriobook 10 marzo 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Solitude." From A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. Online at Koriobook 10 March 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "F. D. E. Schleiermacher." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Diana Berrío) 8 abril 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "On Psychoanalytic Critism." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (FlorenciaHsu) 14 abril 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Characters in Drama." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Ward El Mouna Belarbi) 3 junio 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Tom Stoppard." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en Scribd (Ward El Mouna Belarbi) 3 junio 2014.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "General Bibliographies of Literature, Criticism and Theory." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism and Philology. En red en UchebaNa5.*
2014
José Angel García Landa. "Research Methodology." De A Bibliography of Literary Theory, Criticism, and Philology. Google Scholar
2014
10) Traducciones
García Landa, José Angel. trad. "Lee Smolin habla sobre El Renacer del Tiempo." Social Science Research Network 26 marzo 2014.*
2014
Cultural Anthropology eJournal 26 marzo 2014.*
2014
History of Western Philosophy eJournal 7.12 (1 abril 2014).*
Metaphysics eJournal 7.9 (2 abril 2014).*
2014

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Domingo, 20 de Diciembre de 2015 20:50. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Trabajos


En Thélème

 

 

miércoles, 29 de octubre de 2014

En Thélème

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El régimen de PPrisa, Rajoy y Cebrián

 

miércoles, 29 de octubre de 2014

El régimen de PPrisa, Rajoy y Cebrián

Y Federico dándole estopa

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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 23:39. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Política


Saliendo del mar

miércoles, 29 de octubre de 2014

Saliendo del mar

Saliendo del mar

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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 23:40. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Revenge Tragedy

jueves, 30 de octubre de 2014

Revenge Tragedy

 

From The Oxford Companion to English Literature:


revenge tragedy, a dramatic genre that flourished in the late Elizabethan and Jacobean period, sometimes known as 'the tragedy of blood'. Kyd's *The Spanish Tragedy (c. 1587), a much-quoted prototype, helped to establish a demand for this popular form; later examples are Marlowe's *The Jew of Malta, Shakespeare's *Titus Andronicus, *The Revenger's Tragedy, and, most notably, *Hamlet; there are also strong revenge elements in *Webster. Common ingredients include the hero's quest for vengeance, often at the prompting of the ghost of a murdered kinsman or loved one; scenes of real or feigned insanity; a play-within-a-play; scenes in graveyards, severed limbs, scenes of carnage and mutilation, etc. Many of these items were inherited from Senecan drama, with the difference that in revenge tragedy violence was not reported but took place on stage: as Vendice in The Revenger's Tragedy rather baldly puts it, while in the process of slowly murdering the duke, 'when the bad bleeds, then is the tragedy good.' The revenge code also produced counter-attacks, as in *The Atheist's Tragedy, in Chapman's *The Revenge of Bussy d'Ambois, and again in Hamlet, in which the heroes refuse or hesitate to follow the convention.

The Revenge of Bussy d'Ambois, a tragedy by G. *Chapman, written 1610/11, printed 1613, a sequel to *Bussy D'Ambois.
     Clermont D'Ambois, brother of Bussy, described by his close friend the duc de Guise as the ideal 'Senecal [i.e. stoical] man', gentle, noble, generous, and 'fix'd in himself', is urged by his brother's ghost to avenge his murder, but will only do so by the honourable method of a duel. He sends a challenge to Muntsurry, who reads it; urged again by the ghost, he introduces himself to Montsurry's house, forces him to fight, and kills him. He then learns of the assassination of the Guise, and, refusing to live amid 'all the horrors of the vicious time' as 'the slave of power', he kills himself. The hero's reluctance to exact revenge recalls certain aspects of *Hamlet (See also REVENGE TRAGEDY.)

The Revenger's Tragedy, a tragedy published anonymously in 1607, and from 1656 ascribed to *Tourneur; its authorship has been disputed since 1891, with some scholars defending the traditional attribution and others championing the rival claims of *Middleton and others.
     The central character is Vendice (or Vindice), intent on revenging the death of his mistress, poisoned by the lecherous old duke. The court is a centre of vice and intrigue; the duchess's youngest son is convicted of rape, she herself seduces Spurio, the duke's bastard, and her two older sons, the duke's stepsons, plot against each other and against Lussurioso, the duke's heir. Vendice, disguised as Plato, appears to attempt to procure his own sister Castiza for Lussurioso; she resists, but their mother Gratiana temporarily succumbs to his bribes and agrees to play the bawd. Vendice murders the duke by tricking him into kissing the poisoned skull of his mistress, and most of the remaining characters kill one another or are killed in a final masque of revengers and murderers; Vendice, who survives the bloodbath, owns up to the murder of the duke, and is promptly condemned to death with his brother and accomplice Hippolite by the duke's successor, old Antonio. He is led off to execution, content to 'die after a nest of dukes'. The play is marked by a tragic intensity of feeling, a powerfully satiric wit, and passages of great poetic richness, all combined, for example, in Vendice's address to 'the bony lady', his dead mistress: 'Does the silkworm expend her yellow labours / For thee?' (III. v. 71 ff.) (See also REVENGE TRAGEDY.)

The Duke of Milan, a tragedy by *Massinger, printed 1623, one of his earliest independent plays and a popular one. It is based on the story of Herod and Mariamne as told by Josephus.
     Lodovico Sforza, duke of Milan, has, in the war between the Emperor Charles and the King of France, allied himself with the latter. On their defeat, he goes to surrender himself to Charles, but, fearing for his life, leaves a written instruction with his wicked favourite Francisco to put his beloved wife Marcella to death if he himself is killed. Francisco, seeking to corrupt Marcella in revenge for the dishonoring of his own sister Eugenia by Sforza, reveals the existence of the warrant to her, but fails to move her chastity and only incenses her against the duke, so that on his return after a reconciliation with Charles she receives him coldly. This, coupled with accusations from various quarters of his wife's intmacy with Francisco, makes the duke suspicious of her. Francisco now tells Sforza that Marcella made amorous advances to him, which so inflames the duke with anger that he stabs her to death; dying, she reveals the truth, leaving her husband distracted with remorse. Francisco flees, then returns to court diguised as a Jewish doctor and undertakes to restore Marcella to life. He is discovered and tortured, but not before he succeeds in poisoning the duke.


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OTHELLO

jueves, 30 de octubre de 2014

OTHELLO


—From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble.

Othello,  the Moor of Venice, a tragedy by *Shakespeare, written between 1602 and 1604 when it was performed before James I at Whitehall. It was first printed in quarto in 1622, and again in a different version in the *Folio of 1623. The story is taken from *Cinthio, which Shakespeare could have read in Italian or French.

The play's first act (which *Verdi's opera Otello omits) is set in Venice. Desdemona, the daughter of Brabantio, a Venetian senator, has secretly married Othello, a Moor in the service of the state. Accused before the duke and senators of having stolen Brabantio's daughter, Othello explains and justifies his conduct, and is asked by the Senate to lead the Venetian forces against the Turks who are about to attack Cyprus.

In the middle of a storm which disperses the Turkish fleet, Othello lands in Cyprus with Desdemona, Cassio, a yhoung Florentine, who helped him court his wife and whom he has now promoted to be his lieutenant, and Iago, an older soldier, bitterly resentful of being passed over for promotion, who now plans his revenge. Iago uses Roderigo, 'a gull'd Gentleman' in love with Desdemona, to fight with Cassio after he has got him drunk, so that Othello deprives him of his new rank. He then persuades Cassio to ask Desdemona to plead in his favour with Othello, which she warmly does. At the same time he suggests to Othello that Cassio is, and has been, Desdemona's lover, finally, arranging through his wife Emilia, who is Desdemona's waiting-woman, that Othello should see Cassio in possession of a handkerchief which he had given to his bride. Othello is taken in by Iago's promptings and in frenzied jealousy smothers Desdemona in her bed. Iago sets Roderigo to murder Cassio, but when Roderigo fails to to this Iago kills him and Emilia as well, after she has proved Desdemona's innocence to Othello. Emilia's evidence and letters found on Roderigo prove Iago's guilt; he is arrested, and Othello, having tried to stab him, kills himself.

According to *Rymer one of the play's morals was 'a warning to all good wives that they look well to their linen'. *Coleridge in a famous phrase described Iago's soliloquy at the end of I. iii as 'the motive-hunting of motiveless malignity'.


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Seguimos en la Cima de la Cima

jueves, 30 de octubre de 2014

Seguimos en la Cima de la Cima

Un día caeremos a la Sima de la Sima, pero de momento estamos, según los índices objetivables, en la cima de la cima.

La red social ACADEMIA, "el Facebook de los universitarios", tiene más de once millones de usuarios. Desde hace más de un mes estoy (según el ránking automático de esta red) en su sector superior, o sea, en el 1 por mil de entre los usuarios más visitados.  Tengo  este mes 3.788 visionados de documentos, y 2.709 visitantes distintos. Seguidores y consultas totales figuran en la imagen abajo. ¿Entro en más detalles sobre quién está en ese uno por mil, y quién no? Mejor no.

Deben ser éstos mis 15 minutos de popularidad, si esto cuenta como popularidad. Si no cuenta, al menos son más de 15 minutos, y de 15 días. Quede este pantallazo para acreditarlo, y la copita de píxeles como merecido premio a mi carrera.


academia 2014

Toma, Melpómene,
para ti la gloria ganada por mis méritos,
que yo sólo quiero que ciñas de buen grado
mi cabellera con laurel Délfico.








—oOo— 
 


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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 23:50. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Internet




Capturar el movimiento

lunes, 27 de octubre de 2014

Capturar el movimiento

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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 21:29. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Bibliografía sobre Espacio y Literatura

lunes, 27 de octubre de 2014

Bibliografía sobre Espacio y Literatura

Space.&literature.doc by JAGL - uploaded by Veronica Bernabei

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Regalo

martes, 28 de octubre de 2014

Regalo

Regalo

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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 22:40. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


SAMSON AGONISTES

martes, 28 de octubre de 2014

SAMSON AGONISTES

From The Oxford Companion to English Literature, ed. Margaret Drabble:


Samson Agonistes, a tragedy by *Milton, published 1671, in the same volume as *Paradise Regained. Its composition was traditionally assigned to 1666-70, but W. R. Parker in his biography (1968) argues that it was written much earlier, possibly as early as 1647. A closet drama never intended for the stage, it is modelled on Greek tragedy, and has been frequently compared to Prometheus Bound by *Aeschylus or Oedipus at Colonus by *Sophocles: other critics have claimed that its spirit is more Hebraic (or indeed Christian) than Hellenic. Proedominantly in blank verse, it also contains passages of great metrical freedom and originality, and some rhyme. Samson Agonistes (i.e. Samson the Wrestler, or Champion) deasl with the last phase of the life of the Samson of the Book of Judges when he is a prisoner of the Philistines and blind, a phase which many have compared to the assumed circumstances of the blind poet himself, after the collapse of the Commonwealth and his political hopes.

Samson, in prison at Gaza, is visited by friends of his tribe (the chorus) who comfort him; then by his old father Manoa, who holds out hopes of securing his release; then by his wife *Dalila, who seeks pardon and reconciliation, but by being repudiated shows herself 'a manifest Serpent'; then by Harapha, a strong man of Gath, who taunts Samson. He is finally summoned to provide amusement by feats of strength for the Philistines, who are celebrating a feast to *Dagon. He goes, and presently a messenger brings news of his final feat of strength in which he pulled down the pillars of the place where the assembly was gathered, destroying himself as well as the entire throng. The tragedy, which has many passages questioning divine providence ('Just or unjust, alike seem miserable'), ends with the chorus's conclusion that despite human doubts, all is for the best in the 'unsearchable dispose/ Of highest wisdom': its last words, 'calm of mind all passion spent', strike a note of Aristotelian *catharsis, and the whole piece conforms to the *neo-classical doctrine of unities.


 

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God and Mammon: The Wealth of Literary Memory

martes, 28 de octubre de 2014

10. God and Mammon: The Wealth of Literary Memory

Del curso sobre Milton en la universidad de Yale:

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Día muy oscuro

miércoles, 29 de octubre de 2014

Día muy oscuro


Día muy oscuro



—oOo—

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Lunes, 21 de Diciembre de 2015 23:35. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


La Voz Interior (Postmodernidad discreta)

 

miércoles, 29 de octubre de 2014

La voz interior (Posmodernidad discreta)

Somos citados (a cuenta de Narratology) en esta tesis doctoral sobre Darío Jaramillo, Posmodernidad Discreta:

DLEH_Adam_Faye_Posmodernidad_discreta.pdf by Nellie Carrie Sánchez Ramos

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Bea en Lapamán, 4

viernes, 31 de octubre de 2014

Bea en Lapamán, 4

Bea en Lapamán, 4

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Lunes, 28 de Diciembre de 2015 06:25. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Lo que era noticia

viernes, 31 de octubre de 2014

Lo que era noticia

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Lunes, 28 de Diciembre de 2015 06:27. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Blogs


See the Sea 2

viernes, 31 de octubre de 2014

See the Sea 2

See the Sea 2

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Lunes, 28 de Diciembre de 2015 06:28. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Posicionamiento en Google Scholar

1 de noviembre de 2014

POSICIONAMIENTO EN GOOGLE SCHOLAR

 

En Google Scholar no salgo quizá tan bien retratado como en Academia.edu. Tiene una opción este Google, poniendo el nombre de la universidad en el buscador, que muestra de modo cruel y despiadado a todos los profesores de esa universidad ordenados por número de citas. (De las que le constan a Google).

Así que éste es el ránking de los profesores de la Universidad de Zaragoza, según Google, que es autoridad en la materia.

Ahí es ése el ránking, por citas, y no por número de visitas recientes como en Academia. Y no es que figure mal, yo—sigo el primero de mi área, si no contamos a Susana Onega, que no ha puesto su universidad y no figura por tanto en el ránking general—y en total salgo en posición 130, con más de 500 citas, que para humanidades es muchísimo, pues normalmente nos ignoramos mutuamente, y nos ignoran también. De hecho hay sólo tres o cuatro de las áreas de Letras (Javier García Marco, Juan de la Riva, Tramullas...) que salen mejor posicionados. Ahora bien, Google Scholar creo que sólo incluye a los que se dan de alta voluntariamente—como Academia, por otra parte—así que más serán los llamados y más los elegidos si atienden y se dan de alta, igual me mandan al puesto 200, por decir.



Y a ver cómo ando de índices y de bilirrubina:

 Citation indices     All        since 2009

Citations        522         235
h-index                        7          5
i10-index           4          3










Hace dos meses iba así la cosa:


Citation indicesAll       Since 2009
Citations 513          226
h-index   6        5
i10-index   4         3







PS: En febrero de 2015 hemos subido algo más:

Citation indicesAllSince 2010
Citations630248
h-index96
i10-index93


—y aún más a mediados de mes:

Citation indicesAllSince 2010
Citations663261
h-index106
i10-index113





______


A principios de abril 2015:

Citation indicesAllSince 2010
Citations690266
h-index116
i10-index123


____

Y a finales de mayo de 2015:

Citation indicesAllSince 2010
Citations702277
h-index116
i10-index123




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Lunes, 28 de Diciembre de 2015 06:30. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Internet


Fotos antiguas no vistas

jueves, 6 de noviembre de 2014

Fotos antiguas no vistas

Me las manda mamá, una colección de esas que van circulando por la red—y es que son buenísimas, estas fotos antiguas no vistas (powerpoint).

—oOo—

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Martes, 29 de Diciembre de 2015 10:01. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Trying On a Mask

jueves, 6 de noviembre de 2014

Trying on a Mask

Trying on a Mask

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Martes, 29 de Diciembre de 2015 10:02. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


Topsight in 'The Art of War'

viernes, 7 de noviembre de 2014

Topsight in 'The Art of War'

La perspectiva dominante en 'El Arte de la Guerra': Más aspectos de un clásico chino 

 (Topsight in 'The Art of War': Further aspects of a Chinese classic))


Jose Angel Garcia Landa


Universidad de Zaragoza

May 5, 2014

Ibercampus (May 5, 2014)

Abstract:     

Spanish abstract: Proporcionamos en este artículo un acercamiento narratológico al 'Arte de la Guerra', clásico chino sobre estrategia militar atribuido a Sun Tzu (Sunzi). Esta lectura enfatiza las dimensiones cognitivas del texto, entendido como un tratado sobre la perspectiva y el punto de vista, y como una formulación temprana del concepto de perspectiva dominante o 'topsight'. También examinamos sus estructuras temorales implícitas, en especial en lo referente al papel de la retrospección. El texto de Sunzi tiene, en suma, una interesante dimensión como teoría de la perspectiva, de la acción, y de la representación intersubjetiva.

English abstract: This paper provides a narratological perspective on 'The Art of War', a Chinese classic treatise of military strategy attributed to Sun Tzu. This reading foregrounds the cognitive aspects of the text as a treatise in perspective and point of view, and as an early formulation of the concept of topsight. It also examines its implicit temporal structures, especially as regards the role of retrospection. All in all, Sun Tzu's text has an interesting dimension as a theory of perspective, of action, and of intersubjective representation.


Number of Pages in PDF File: 10

Keywords: Sun Tzu, Strategy, Topsight, Perspective, Knowledge, Information, War, Strategy, Models, Plans, Retrospection, Narratology, Theory of action, Chinese literature,
 
Accepted Paper Series

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Martes, 29 de Diciembre de 2015 10:05. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Literatura y crítica


Aquí con mis fotos de reflejos

viernes, 7 de noviembre de 2014

Aquí con mis fotos de reflejos

Aquí con mis fotos de reflejos

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Jueves, 31 de Diciembre de 2015 15:41. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Imágenes


En la Vniversidad de Salamanca

 

sábado, 8 de noviembre de 2014

En la Vniversidad de Salamanca

No es de ayer, tampoco es de hoy, pero aquí estamos Shakespeare y yo como dos referencias centrales en Filología Inglesa. En una buena universidad, con buena tradición de Filología Inglesa, la Universidad de Salamanca.  También en la Universidad de Salamanca publiqué uno de mis escasos libros, Acción, Relato, Discurso: Estructura de la ficción narrativa. Como más libros no creo que escriba yo, déjenme al menos retratarme en pantallazo de esta Biblioteca de Filología:


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Jueves, 31 de Diciembre de 2015 17:51. José Ángel García Landa Enlace permanente. Me enlazan






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